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Beauty and the Beast (1946) Poster

Trivia

The effect of the candles lighting themselves as the merchant passes them was achieved by blowing them out and then running the film in reverse as he walked backward past them. The entire sequence was done in one long take and reversed - a quick glimpse of the fireplace shows the flames appearing to move downward.
Philip Glass composed an opera perfectly synchronized to the film. The original soundtrack was eliminated, and he composed the opera to be performed along with the film projected behind the orchestra and voice talent. The compact disc recording of Glass' "La Belle et la Bête" can be played alongside the film with a very similar effect. Note: the opera is recorded on two compact discs; hence it will be necessary to pause the film once while changing discs. In the US, the second DVD release of this film by the Criterion Collection gives the viewer the option of hearing the original soundtrack or the Glass opera version, which, in a sense, gives you two movies for the price of one. Glass has composed similar works for two other Jean Cocteau films: Orpheus (1950) and Les Enfants Terribles (1950).
So convincing was Jean Marais underneath his make-up as the Beast, that when he was transformed at the end back to human form, Greta Garbo famously said "Give me back my Beast!"
The look and decor of the film was influenced by the work of nineteenth-century artist and engraver Gustave Doré, most famous for illustrating a famous nineteenth century French edition of "Don Quixote". Doré's illustrations for that novel are so famous that they continue to be reprinted even today.
During the shooting of the film, Jean Cocteau became very ill and eventually had to be hospitalized. While he was recovering, René Clément served as the director.
The stream that the Beast tries to drink from when he is weak and dying is actually a sewage runoff behind the studio.
Jean Cocteau used several different kinds of film stock because of the difficulty of getting stock immediately after the war. He claimed that the different visual textures added to the poetic effect of the film.
It took five hours for Jean Marais to put on his make-up as the Beast.
The costumes were manufactured at the workshop of the famous Paris couture house of Jeanne Lanvin, with the men's costumes under the supervision of Lanvin designer Pierre Cardin
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Jean Marais said that the initial design for the Beast was like a deer, before the more predatory look was decided upon.
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"On my face there's a plenty of cracks, wounds and itches and my hands are bleeding" Jean Cocteau wrote when he was hospitalized because of a bad skin disease "but the face and the hands of Jean Marais are covered with a so painful crust that removing it is similar to suffer my treatments". In fact all the visible parts of the body of Marais were covered every morning with animal hair.
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Turner Classic Movies host Robert Osborne lists this film as one of his favorites.
The popular song "Beauty and the Beast" by Stevie Nicks was inspired by this film. In 2007, she got the rights for the movie and it plays behind her as she sings the song. It is the last song in her set list.
The studio and locations were so cold that the cast huddled around the lights between shots to keep warm.
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Jean Marais' face, hands and any other body parts not hidden by his costume were covered in animal hair. Once his fangs were in, he could not remove them, so he could eat nothing while filming except mush.
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To create the living human carvings in the fireplace and other architectural elements in the Beast's castle, Jean Cocteau hired local children who were made up with plaster to look like stone figures. At one point, the even had the faces in the fireplace breathe smoke.
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Jean Marais originally suggested to Jean Cocteau for the beast to have a stag's head, obviously remembering a detail in the fairy tale. While this suggestion followed the narrative lines of its fairy tale origin and would have evoked the mythical echo of Cernunnos, the Celtic stag-headed god of the woods. Marais' idea was nonetheless refused by Cocteau who feared that in the eyes of modern cinema audiences a stag's head would turn the beast into a laughing-stock.
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Initially, Jean Cocteau and Henri Alekan clashed over the filming style. Alekan wanted to use soft focus to create his version of what a fairy tale would look like. Cocteau, however, insisted a more hard-edged style would make even the most fantastic scenes seem grounded in reality. After the first few days of shooting, Alekan declared the rushes laughably bad. As Cocteau persisted in pursuing his personal vision of the film, the cinematographer gradually came around.
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Most of the available cameras were old and worn, often jamming during filming.
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The electrical supply at the studio was inconsistent, with frequent blackouts to divert power to other parts of the district.
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Costumes had to be made from fabric scraps, and the props department had trouble finding sheets without patches for the laundry scene. With fabric in short supply, the crew often arrived at the studio to find Beauty's bed-curtains had been stolen during the night.
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The House of Lanvin made all of the costumes, with resident designer Pierre Cardin supervising the men's wardrobe.
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Exteriors for the Beast's castle were shot at the Chateau de Raray near Senlis.
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The farmhouse scenes were shot on a farm outside Tours near an airfield. Although the commanding officer was happy to give the company permission to film there, he did not always keep track of the shooting schedule. As a result, takes were often ruined by the sound of training flights overhead.
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The first screening took place before the staff of the studio at Joinville. Jean Cocteau was so nervous, he invited his friend Marlene Dietrich, whose hand he held tightly as the film unwound. The response, however, was enthusiastic.
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For the film's U.S. release conventional credits replaced the original ones, in which the credits were written in chalk and erased by Jean Cocteau's hand. This also eliminated the film clapboard seen between the opening credits and the written prologue.
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The look of the farmhouse scenes was inspired by the paintings of Jan Vermeer.
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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