La belle et la bête (1946) - News Poster

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My Favorite Film Screenings of 2017

My Ten Favorite Film Screenings of 2017 10. Loving Vincent (2017; dir. Dorota Kobiela & Hugh Welchman; Lincoln Plaza Cinema) 9. The Red Turtle (2016; dir. Michaël Dudok de Wit; Lincoln Plaza Cinema) 8. Metropolis (1927; dir. Fritz Lang; Marble Collegiate Church) 7. La Belle et la Bête (1946; dir. Jean Cocteau; Tribeca Film Festival at Town Hall) 6. The Last Animals (2017; dir. Kate Brooks; Tribeca Film Festival at Cinépolis Chelsea) 5. City Lights (1931; dir. Charlie Chaplin; United Palace) 4. Harmony of Difference (2017; dir. Kamasi Washington; Whitney Biennial) 3. Romeo + Juliet (1996; dir. Baz Luhrmann; Little Cinema at House of Yes) 2. Imponderable (2015-16; dir. Tony […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Guillermo Del Toro’s ‘The Shape of Water’ Is One of His Best Films Because It’s His Most Conventional — Opinion

  • Indiewire
Guillermo Del Toro’s ‘The Shape of Water’ Is One of His Best Films Because It’s His Most Conventional — Opinion
Guillermo del Toro loves fairy tales. That’s been clear to moviegoers the world over since “Pan’s Labyrinth,” which took the Mexican auteur to new levels of international acclaim, and it’s brought into sharper relief than ever before by “The Shape of Water.” Its narrative, about a mute woman who falls in love with a fish-like creature at a research facility during the height of the Cold War, is both out-there and familiar — a description that applies to del Toro’s work in general.

Like all the best fairy tales, there’s a reservoir of darkness just beneath the surface of his latest; also like them, it’s a strange story told in a straightforward manner. Call it the shape of del Toro.

Read More:‘The Shape of Water’ Star Doug Jones: Beneath Foam and Latex, a Best Actor Candidate Shines

The way he’s perceived in
See full article at Indiewire »

How Much Shock Can You Stand?

Ghosts are famous for their flexibility, spiraling through keyholes and up from the floorboards in search of their next mark. But movies about ghosts can be flexible too. Three classics of the genre, The Uninvited, House on Haunted Hill and The Innocents, demonstrate that there’s more than one way haunt a house.

These films never appeared on any triple bill that I know of, but I’d like to think they did, somewhere in some small town with a theater manager that knew a good scare when he saw it. How could the programmer resist it? Each film is united by a beautiful black and white sheen, eerie locales and their ability to scare the bejeezus out of you. But they’re also alike in their differences, coming at their specters from distinctly different vantage points.

1944’s The Uninvited, a three-hankie haunted house tale with a dysfunctional family subplot,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Henri Alekan and the Shifting Technology of Film Lighting

By Jacob Oller

Cinematography owes much to the French master. enri Alekan was the cinematographer behind movies like Jean Cocteau’s magical La Belle et la Bête, William Wyler’s Roman Holiday, and Wim WendersWings of Desire. But his book on cinematography is perhaps his greatest legacy. Des lumières et des ombres has been a biblical tome for those […]

The article Henri Alekan and the Shifting Technology of Film Lighting appeared first on Film School Rejects.
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

The Intersex Objects of Bertrand Mandico

  • MUBI
Mubi's retrospective Bertrand Mandico's Cinema is showing July 26 - October 7, 2017 in many countries around the world.The cinema of French filmmaker and animator Bertrand Mandico is unique in its approach to depicting the human body. For Mandico, the body’s status as a film subject is comparable to and interchangeable with that of any other film subject. That is, ‘animate objects’—such as human characters or animals—occupy the same cinematic roles as ‘inanimate’ ones—such as housewares or artificial structures, collapsing the binary that exists between the two. Mandico’s films time and again blur the line between binaries—animate and inanimate, male and female—and in doing so demonstrate their arbitrary nature as film subjects. Bodies and objects in Mandico’s cinema often appear abstracted and juxtaposed vis-a-vis each other, such as when women portray lamps and men portray statues in Our Lady of Hormones (2014). At first glance,
See full article at MUBI »

The Beauty of Jean Cocteau’s ‘La Belle et la Bête’

Forget Disney’s recent reiteration of the classic fairy tale and instead look back at where the tale’s magic began on film, with Jean Cocteau.

The self-titled Belle and her captor-turned-prince Beast have returned to cinema screens around the world. In Disney’s latest live-action reiteration of one of their much-loved animated fairytales, Bill Condon’s live-action Beauty and the Beast has reintroduced contemporary audiences to the pair. With their return has come explorations of Disney’s representations of gayness, the question of modern viewing habits, and record-breaking box office success (the film has broken the March record for best opening with a $175m domestic gross).

This multiplicity of films on the same tale has been seen before, with the reintroduction of Snow White in 2012 arriving in the form of three very different films. 2012 brought the strong and defiant rebel ‘Snow’ in Snow White and the Huntsman, while Mirror Mirror restyled the classic tale. Pablo Berger
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

The Nature of Borowczyk’s Passion: Close-Up on "The Beast"

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a column that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. The retrospective The Many Sins of Walerian Borowczyk is showing February 12 - June 18, 2017 in the United States and in many other countries around the world.As the reverberation of horses fervently neighing and clomping their hooves begins to permeate the opening credit soundtrack of The Beast, one may recall the similarly orchestrated donkey brays that introduce Robert Bresson’s Au hasard Balthazar (1966). Or, given its title, and the very basic concept of a young woman becoming enamored with an savage creature, one may be tempted to compare this 1975 feature to the many variations of Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve’s classic fairy tale, La belle et la bête. One would be more than a little confounded, however, by making either inadequate association. If Walerian Borowczyk’s semi-porn-semi-art-semi-monster movie bears any resemblance to another film or story, it would be
See full article at MUBI »

The Magic of Jacques Demy

Taking a look at the French director’s fascinating filmography.

One of the biggest films of 2016, La La Land, owes a thing or two to French director Jacques Demy. The bright, colorful musical visually mirrors Demy’s The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964) and The Young Girls of Rochefort (1967), and director Damien Chazelle was able to capture something of the melancholic sweetness of Demy’s musicals. Demy is not one of the most famous French directors, however his films have a specific charm and intelligence that no other filmmaker could match. The way he blended Hollywood style with French culture was unlike any other filmmaker at the time.

Demy began his career in 1960s France, during the time of the “Nouvelle Vague” or French New Wave. This was the time of films such as Breathless, Jules and Jim, The 400 Blows, and Le Beau Serge. However, Demy lies a little bit outside of this group of filmmakers, and
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Beauty and the Beast review – gilt complex

Bill Condon’s live-action recasting of the Disney classic is ornate to the point of desperation

Poor Disney. With this live-action remake of the beloved animation Beauty and the Beast, the studio tried to do the right thing. A gay character (played by Josh Gad) is introduced and Belle (Emma Watson) gets an injection of feminist sass. Unfortunately, Gad’s character LeFou is hardly the celebration of diversity one would hope for – he’s a prancing rainbow flag of a sidekick, defined by the comic potential of his sexuality rather than just his sexuality. And Belle, with her skirt tucked into her bloomers and her sniffy disdain for the “provincial life”, might be a feminist but she’s also kind of a dick.

Bill Condon’s revamp of the material goes all out on spectacle. And, with its flourishes, curlicues and gilt – so much gilt! – the film is undeniably arresting.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘Great Wall’ Director Zhang Yimou Starts ‘Shadow’

‘Great Wall’ Director Zhang Yimou Starts ‘Shadow’
Yimou Zhang , the Chinese director whose recent “The Great Wall” has grossed $328 million worldwide, has begun production of his next movie, “Shadow.”

The film is a co-venture between Village Roadshow Pictures Asia and Le Vision Pictures, for which Zhang is retained as an artistic consultant.

The producers have revealed little about the project, though Chinese media report it as a historical picture set in the Three Kingdoms era.

The cast confirmed to date for “Shadow” includes Deng Chao, Zheng Kai, Wang Qianyuan, Hu Jun, Guan Xiaotong, Wu Lei and Wang Jingchun. Others are expected to join the picture.

Zhang is one of China’s foremost directors of drama, pithy comedy and large-scale historical action. Many of his films have played at major festivals and been China’s foreign-language Oscar contender. His venture into the mainstream with “The Great Wall,” a VFX-heavy historical fantasy actioner shot largely in English and starring Matt Damon,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Beauty and the Beast’: How Bill Condon Built Hollywood’s Most Expensive Musical

‘Beauty and the Beast’: How Bill Condon Built Hollywood’s Most Expensive Musical
Bill Condon knew that turning the 1991 animated musical classic “Beauty and the Beast” into a live-action musical would be a huge risk.

In many ways, Condon’s a perfect match for “Beauty and the Beast.” He’s one of the few directors who know how to deliver intimate, swoony romance, believable singing musical sequences, and digitally enhanced visceral action. He wrote Rob Marshall’s Oscar-winning “Chicago,” wrote and directed “Gods and Monsters” (starring Oscar-nominated Ian McKellen) as well as the Oscar-winning musical “Dreamgirls,” and shepherded the last two “Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn” sequels to $1.52 billion worldwide.

Given the chance to make the biggest-budget movie of his career, he embraced what could be the most expensive Hollywood musical of all time. “Beauty and the Beast” clearly has The Condon Touch: two men in love with the same feisty heroine, digital wolves, magical creatures, Ian McKellen, swirling cameras, gorgeous production values, a rich orchestral score,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Beauty and the Beast’: How Bill Condon Built Hollywood’s Most Expensive Musical

‘Beauty and the Beast’: How Bill Condon Built Hollywood’s Most Expensive Musical
Bill Condon knew that turning the 1991 animated musical classic “Beauty and the Beast” into a live-action musical would be a huge risk.

In many ways, Condon’s a perfect match for “Beauty and the Beast.” He’s one of the few directors who know how to deliver intimate, swoony romance, believable singing musical sequences, and digitally enhanced visceral action. He wrote Rob Marshall’s Oscar-winning “Chicago,” wrote and directed “Gods and Monsters” (starring Oscar-nominated Ian McKellen) as well as the Oscar-winning musical “Dreamgirls,” and shepherded the last two “Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn” sequels to $1.52 billion worldwide.

Given the chance to make the biggest-budget movie of his career, he embraced what could be the most expensive Hollywood musical of all time. “Beauty and the Beast” clearly has The Condon Touch: two men in love with the same feisty heroine, digital wolves, magical creatures, Ian McKellen, swirling cameras, gorgeous production values, a rich orchestral score,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Beauty and the Beast’ Review: Disney’s Animated Classic Gets A Needless Makeover

‘Beauty and the Beast’ Review: Disney’s Animated Classic Gets A Needless Makeover
Disney wants us to know that Bill Condon’s “Beauty and the Beast” is a vital live-action remake of its own 1991 animated classic. Alan Menken and Tim Rice wrote three new songs for the film, and in interviews, Condon promised the first “exclusively gay moment in a Disney movie.”

They succeeded on one point: The film’s most Broadway-like thrills come from the Menken-Rice tune written as the Beast’s soliloquy. As for that gay moment, it’s tough to know which one he meant. There are a few winks and nods, the most apparent being a gag at the end where Wardrobe dresses three intruders in women’s clothes. In what could have been another tired cross-dressing gag (two men run away in disgust), a third stares directly into camera, beaming. Condon also might have been referring to another blink-and-you’ll-miss-it moment, when Monsieur LeFou (Josh Gad), right-hand man to Belle’s suitor Gaston,
See full article at Indiewire »

Beauty and the Beast review: Dir. Bill Condon (2017)

Beauty and the Beast review: Disney follow on from their success on The Jungle Book with this revisit to their 1991 animated classic.

Beauty and the Beast review, Paul Heath, March 2017.

Beauty and the Beast review

The Walt Disney Company continue on their journey to adapt every single one of their animated films to live-action form with an attempt to repeat the success of a 1991 classic. So far on that journey, which will continue with Aladdin and The Lion King in the future, the Mouse House has had quite the success, particularly with their last effort, The Jungle Book, which was surprisingly good. It’s a shame that Beauty and the Beast fails to duplicate that accomplishment.

This, ahem, tale as old as time revolves around the central character of Belle (Emma Watson), a twenty-something outcast of a small French village who is the object of affection for local ruffian Gaston
See full article at The Hollywood News »

The Forgotten: Abel Gance's "Austerlitz" (1960)

  • MUBI
The great film historian Kevin Brownlow, who has devoted large sections of his life to restoring Abel Gance's 1927 epic Napoleon, takes a dim view of this one. And indeed Austerlitz, a.k.a. The Battle of Austerlitz, has several strikes against it, belongs to several categories of film maudit all at once. It's a late film by a seventy-one-year-old director whose best work, by universal consensus, was in the silent era; it's a kind of belated sequel, the further adventures of Napoleon Bonaparte; it's a Salkind production.Incidentally, viewing the lavish sets for this movie, we can see how the Salkinds, those roving multinational mountebanks, ran up the unpaid studio bills in Yugoslavia which kept Orson Welles from building the elaborate vanishing sets he had planned for The Trial (starting realistic, it would have ended up playing in a featureless void), necessitating the repurposing of a disused Parisian railway station.
See full article at MUBI »

Disney's Live-Action Beauty and the Beast: the Biggest Character Difference

Image Source: Entertainment Weekly On Monday, Entertainment Weekly released an official first look at the live-action Beauty and the Beast, complete with a stunning cover and a few fantastic inside photos. Up until now, we hadn't really seen very much of either title character. We caught a glimpse of Belle in the first teaser earlier this year, and the Beast himself has been entirely absent . . . until now. So, how is the live-action stacking up to the original, now that we're getting a sense of what it will be like? Related:14 Disney Classics Being Rebooted Into Live-Action MoviesEmma Watson Gets Into Character as Belle in This Beauty and the Beast Sneak PeekRemain Calm: There Are New Live-Action Beauty and the Beast Pictures Well, in my opinion, this newly updated Beast looks . . . strange. His face is unmistakably human. He's got more of a nose than a snout, well-groomed eyebrows, small eyes, and normal lips.
See full article at BuzzSugar »

Movie Review: An extravagant French Beauty And The Beast only gets skin deep

  • The AV Club
Cast as a prince who falls for a spinster in Matteo Garrone’s fairy-tale anthology Tale Of Tales, the French actor Vincent Cassel proved that he could do a mean impression of a horny cartoon wolf, which is enough to make him seem like an inspired and maybe even subversive choice for the role of the hairy monster in an adaptation of “Beauty And The Beast.” Alas, Christophe Gans’ storybook version—which was released internationally in 2014, but is only now making its way to U.S. theaters—makes Cassel into a brooding creature in a velvet doublet, modeled on the Beast in Jean Cocteau’s classic 1946 interpretation of the fairy tale. This is the only real inspiration Gans (who also-co-wrote) takes from Cocteau; his attractive but tiresome effects-laden adaptation of this old and familiar story is not one for poetry or metaphor.

As always, there is Belle (Léa ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Supergirl Season 2: Superman Takes Flight in First Teaser Trailer

Supergirl Season 2: Superman Takes Flight in First Teaser Trailer
Not since The Care Bears have we been this excited to see cousins team up and save the day.

The CW on Monday released a teaser trailer from Supergirl‘s upcoming second season (Oct. 10, 8/7c), revealing the first footage of Tyler Hoechlin in action as Clark Kent (aka Superman). It’s only a 30-second teaser — during which Cat Grant gets about as much face time as the Man of Steel — so we’ll just consider it a nice little post-Emmys treat.

RelatedSupergirl Season 2 Photos: Superman, Lena Luthor and, Yes, Cat Grant

The new video finds the cousins joining forces
See full article at TVLine.com »

The CW Turns 10: Life Unexpected, Containment, The L.A. Complex and 7 More Underrated Gems Remembered

The CW Turns 10: Life Unexpected, Containment, The L.A. Complex and 7 More Underrated Gems Remembered
Can you believe it’s been exactly 10 years since The CW came into our lives?

PhotosBest & Worst New Shows: The TVLine Staff Share Its Picks… and Passes

The network aired its first broadcast on Sept. 18, 2006, and while the love child of The WB and Upn has delivered plenty of household hits in its first decade — some of which, like The Vampire Diaries, still run to this day — we’d like to draw your attention to a few of its less-familiar gems.

We’re talking about those short-lived series whose cancellations you still refuse to accept. Those comedies and dramas that
See full article at TVLine.com »

Ratings: Thursday Night Football Opens Down vs. 2015, Beast Flat With Finale

Ratings: Thursday Night Football Opens Down vs. 2015, Beast Flat With Finale
CBS and NFL Network’s combined coverage of the Thursday Night Football match-up between the Jets and Bills on Thursday averaged 15.4 million total viewers and a 5.4 demo rating (per finals), down 27 and 28 percent from the networks’ broadcast of last year’s kickoff game between the Broncos and Chiefs.

RelatedBeauty and the Beast Series Finale Recap: La Belle et la Bête

The night’s only other fresh broadcast programming — The CW’s Beauty and the Beast series finale — drew 700,000 total viewers and a 0.2 rating, clutching onto the series-low demo number it maintained for all of Season 4.

RelatedFall TV 2016: Your
See full article at TVLine.com »
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