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La belle et la bête (1946)

Not Rated | | Drama, Fantasy, Romance | 23 December 1947 (USA)
A beautiful young woman takes her father's place as the prisoner of a mysterious beast, who wishes to marry her.

Directors:

, (uncredited)

Writers:

(dialogue), (screenplay) | 2 more credits »

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1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
La Bête (The Beast) / The Prince / Avenant
...
Mila Parély ...
Félicie
Nane Germon ...
Adélaïde
...
Raoul Marco ...
The Usurer
Marcel André ...
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Janice Felty ...
John Kuether ...
The Father / The usurer (1995 opera version) (singing voice)
Jacques Marbeuf
Ana María Martinez ...
Félicie (1995 opera version) (singing voice)
Hallie Neill ...
Adélaïde (1995 opera version) (singing voice)
Gregory Purnhagen ...
La Bête / Avenant / Ardent / The port official (1995 opera version) (singing voice)
Zhang Zhou ...
Edit

Storyline

Adélaïde, Belle, Félicie and Ludovic are young adult siblings who once lived in grandeur until their father's merchant ships were lost at sea. The family is now near ruin, but Adélaïde and Félicie nonetheless still squander away the family money on themselves and keeping beautiful, whereas Belle slaves around the house, doting on her father. Ludovic detests his two spoiled sisters, but is protective of Belle, especially with his friend Avenant, a handsome scoundrel who wants to marry Belle. Crossing the forest one dark and stormy evening, the father gets lost and takes refuge in a fantastical castle. Upon leaving, he steals a blossom off a rose bush, which Belle requested. The castle's resident, an angry beast, sentences him to one of two options for the theft of the rose: his own death, or that of one of his daughters. As she feels she is the cause of her father's predicament (despite her sisters asking for far more lavish gifts), Belle sacrifices herself to the beast. Upon arriving ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The Picture of 1001 Wonders See more »

Genres:

Drama | Fantasy | Romance

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

23 December 1947 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

La bella y la bestia  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$3,708 (USA) (23 June 2002)

Gross:

$298,718 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

| (1995 opera version)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The popular song "Beauty and the Beast" by Stevie Nicks was inspired by this film. In 2007, she got the rights for the movie and it plays behind her as she sings the song. It is the last song in her set list. See more »

Goofs

As the boys ride out of the barn on magnificent to go and steal the treasure of the beast, the lad on back loses his hat. In the next shot, shown from outside, both riders are wearing their hats. See more »

Quotes

La Bête: So, my dear sir, you steal my roses. You steal my roses, the things I love most in all the world. Your luck has gone from bad to worse. You could have taken anything except my roses. The punishment for this simple theft is death!
Belle's Father: Sir, I didn't know. I meant no harm. My daughter asked me to bring her a rose.
La Bête: Don't address me as "sir." I'm called the Beast! I don't like compliments. Don't try to understand. You have fifteen minutes to prepare to die!
Belle's Father: Sir...
La Bête: Again! The Beast orders you to be ...
[...]
See more »

Crazy Credits

The title and some of the opening credits are written with chalk on a blackboard, and then erased. See more »

Connections

Featured in Cocteau Marais - Un couple mythique (2013) See more »

Soundtracks

La belle et la bête
an opera by Philip Glass
(Not part of the original soundtrack, and not heard in the film's first two releases)
© 1995 Nonesuch Records for the US and WEA International Inc. for the world outside of the United States
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
As beautiful as they come...
5 March 2002 | by (Bronx, New York) – See all my reviews

This might be my nominee for the most beautiful film ever made. It ranks as one of my absolute favorites.

So many images stick in your head afterwards: the billowing draperies; the beast's flashing eyes when he first appears; the way his ears prick up when a deer moves through the woods-- he's trying to talk to Belle but can't help but be distracted-- one of those perfect moments; the way his hands smoke from the fresh blood when he's returned from the hunt; the living eyes in the carved stone; the hall full of arm/candelabras, turning as Belle passes by; Josette Day (quite an image all by herself); the moment that I can't even describe when she sort of folds into the sheets and vanishes-- so on, so on.

This is, in short, what film can do, when it tries. This was made long before computer graphics and the accompanying revolution in special effects, but if any of our modern directors deployed their resources as imaginatively, or as sensitively, as Cocteau did in the 40s, film today might be worth the paper it's printed on. But they don't and it isn't. Ah well. Get this and watch it; all due praise to Disney, but this is the fairy tale to see.


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