I See a Dark Stranger (1946) - News Poster

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New to Streaming: ‘Baby Driver,’ ‘Nocturama,’ ‘The Lost City of Z,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Abacus: Small Enough to Jail (Steve James)

Steve James’ filmography has long been about finding entry into larger conversations through intimate portraits. The director’s landmark debut, Hoop Dreams, and latter-day efforts like 2014’s monument to critic Roger Ebert, Life Itself, don’t have much in common on the surface, but they both use their central characters to tell larger stories about big picture topics like structural dysfunction and the purpose of film criticism.
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Last Sentence | Review

Scenes From a Marriage: Troell’s Latest an Engrossing Character Study

Swedish auteur Jan Troell, at 81, is thankfully still making films, and his latest, The Last Sentence, is a period piece centered on a somewhat obscure historical figure, more in the vein of Hamsun (1996) than the immigrant or social change narratives that Troell is perhaps most famed for, such as his last effort, a 2008 masterpiece, Everlasting Moments. Beginning his directorial career in the mid 60’s, Troell was not only a contemporary of Ingmar Bergman but has often showcased many of Bergman’s troupe, like Max Von Sydow and Liv Ullman (Sydow was purportedly first choice for this latest as well). Here, he assembles a distinct cast and digital black and white cinematography to offset this from his larger body of work, and the pay off his decidedly worthwhile.

Featuring the announcement of Hitler as Germany’s Chancellor in 1932 via newsreel,
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

10 gripping British thrillers of the 1940s

Feature Aliya Whiteley 20 Jun 2013 - 10:11

The films of post-war Britain are fascinating; Aliya picks 10 of the best British thrillers from the 1940s

The 1940s was a heck of a decade for the British. We started it at war with Nazi Germany, with the threat of Ira collaboration with the enemy looming large. By the end of it we had seen Independence achieved by India, lived through strikes and rationing, and held the fourteenth Olympic Games in London at a time of great austerity. The welfare state was under formation, and in the space of ten years we had become a very different country.

The British film industry reflected those changes, particularly in the thrillers that were made. The lines between good and evil, safety and danger, were the stuff of entertainment that tapped into the concerns of the public. It was a period of vivid, ambitious, and surprising films.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Stuart Freeborn obituary

Makeup artist who created Yoda and Chewbacca for the Star Wars films

If there was a film made in Britain between the early 1940s and early 1980s that required innovations in makeup and prosthetics design, chances are that Stuart Freeborn, who has died aged 98, was involved in it in some capacity. The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp, David Lean's adaptation of Oliver Twist, 2001: A Space Odyssey, The Omen, Star Wars, The Empire Strikes Back: all these benefited from Freeborn's pioneering approach to makeup. When audiences gaze with wonder upon the apes in the "dawn of man" sequence at the beginning of 2001, or fall under the spell of the 2ft tall guru Yoda and his gnomic proclamations, their response is a testament to Freeborn's persuasive artistry.

He was born in Leytonstone, east London, where it was assumed that he would follow in the footsteps of his father,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Shadow Dancer – review

James Marsh's gripping thriller takes us deep into the bitterly divided world of 90s Northern Ireland

The director of the gripping Belfast-set thriller Shadow Dancer, James Marsh, and its screenwriter, Tom Bradby, both have one foot in fact and the other in fiction. Marsh is best known for his imaginative feature-length documentaries, Man on Wire, which won an Oscar in 2009, and Project Nim, as well as his TV film Red Riding: 1980. The TV journalist and novelist Bradby reported from Northern Ireland for ITN in the 1990s, the setting of Shadow Dancer, the first of his six thrillers. Their film centres on the perennially interesting relationship between the spy or informer or undercover agent and the person in authority who controls them. The characters are trapped between the complicated moral realities around them and the fictions that fate imposes on them, and the situation goes back at least as far
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Shadow Dancer – review

James Marsh's gripping thriller takes us deep into the bitterly divided world of 90s Northern Ireland

The director of the gripping Belfast-set thriller Shadow Dancer, James Marsh, and its screenwriter, Tom Bradby, both have one foot in fact and the other in fiction. Marsh is best known for his imaginative feature-length documentaries, Man on Wire, which won an Oscar in 2009, and Project Nim, as well as his TV film Red Riding: 1980. The TV journalist and novelist Bradby reported from Northern Ireland for ITN in the 1990s, the setting of Shadow Dancer, the first of his six thrillers. Their film centres on the perennially interesting relationship between the spy or informer or undercover agent and the person in authority who controls them. The characters are trapped between the complicated moral realities around them and the fictions that fate imposes on them, and the situation goes back at least as far
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Deborah Kerr: Socially Dubious Desires

Deborah Kerr movies: with Burt Lancaster in From Here to Eternity Deborah Kerr Pt.2: Sexual Outlaw As an unhappily married woman having a torrid affair with an army officer shortly before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Deborah Kerr is equally powerful in one of her best-remembered movies, From Here to Eternity (1953), stealing the romantic melodrama from her male co-stars. Fred Zinnemann’s Academy Award-winning blockbuster marked one of the rare times when Kerr’s physique played a part in her erotic persona, as she parades around Hawaii in Lana Turner-type shorts and frolics on the wet sand with brawny Burt Lancaster. Less obvious is Kerr’s headmaster’s wife in Tea and Sympathy (1956), who, despite her discreet clothing and demeanor, ends up seducing one of her husband’s teenage students. It’s all for a good cause, of course — the "sensitive" adolescent thinks he may be gay
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Deborah Kerr, Michael Powell Photos: Black Narcissus Behind the Scenes

Deborah Kerr, pony, Michael Powell on the Black Narcissus set The Criterion Collection has posted a series of images providing a glimpse behind the scenes of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's 1947 classic Black Narcissus. Set in the Himalayas, this adaptation of Rumer Godden's novel was filmed entirely in Britain, chiefly at Pinewood Studios. Make sure to check it out here. In the beautifully nuanced Black Narcissus, Deborah Kerr stars as an Anglican nun sent to a convent in the Himalayas. The location's rarefied air and the presence of David Farrar brings to the surface the nun's latent ambivalence toward her vows. Tragedy ensues when another nun, played by Kathleen Byron, falls madly in lust/love with Farrar's character. Also in the Black Narcissus cast: Flora Robson, Sabu, Jean Simmons (in heavy makeup as a local girl), and Esmond Knight. For her efforts in both Black Narcissus and I See a Dark Stranger,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

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