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The Woman in Green (1945) Poster

Trivia

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The Breen Office ordered two cuts from the original script. First, the victims were supposed to be young girls. That was ordered to be changed to young women although Dr. Simnell's bizarre doll fetish may be a leftover from the initial concept. In addition, during the scene in the Mesmer Club, Watson was supposed to take off his pants, not just roll up his pant leg.
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This was the first film in Universal's Sherlock Holmes series in which the main credit for Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce did not list the characters they played. All previous films contained "as Sherlock Holmes" and "as Doctor Watson" with their main credit.
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Although "The Woman in Green" is credited as an original story, dialogue is lifted from Arthur Conan Doyle's "The Final Problem," and the situation involving the sniper firing at Holmes' silhouette is taken from the next story in the original canon, "The Empty House."
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Although he is not seen, the only reference to Mycroft Holmes in the Basil Rathbone / Nigel Bruce series is made in this film.
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The 11th of 14 films based on Arthur Conan Doyle's fictional consulting detective Sherlock Holmes starring Basil Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes and Nigel Bruce as Dr. Watson.
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Norman Ainsley is listed playing an electrician in studio records, but he was not seen in the movie.
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Henry Daniell, who plays Professor Moriarty in the film, had an earlier villainous role as William Easter in Sherlock Holmes in Washington (1943), and as an ally of Holmes, Anthony Lloyd, in Sherlock Holmes and the Voice of Terror (1942).
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This was slipped past the censors: a very suggestive shadow on the wall behind the woman at about 9.5 minutes in. It reappears a minute or two later. It thematically relates to what the man and woman are thinking about.
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One of several titles in the Sherlock Holmes series whose original copyrights were apparently not renewed and have thereby fallen into public domain; as a result, seriously inferior copies are presently being offered by a number of VHS and DVD dealers who do not have access to original studio masters.
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This marks the third Sherlock Holmes' movie starred by Basil Rathbone where Holmes faces Prof. James Moriarty, after The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1939) and Sherlock Holmes and the Secret Weapon (1942). Curiously, in each movie Moriarty is portrayed by a different actor: George Zucco, Lionel Atwill and Henry Daniell, respectively.
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

Sherlock Holmes is given cannabis troponica (which is a strain of marijuana that is not produced anymore) to relax his mind and make it easier for him to be hypnotized.
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This marks the second movie in the Basil Rathbone's Sherlock Holmes movies after The Spider Woman (1943) where a woman is a main antagonist. Lydia Marlowe, played by 'Hillary Brooke', is a foreshadowing of Irene Adler, a Holmes' antagonist on the Arthur Conan Doyle's books and short stories and occasional Prof. James Moriarty's companion, exactly the same that in this movie.
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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