A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

10 items from 2011


Joan Blondell Q&A Pt.4: John Cassavetes' Opening Night, Transsexualism in The Woman Inside

24 August 2011 7:37 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Joan Blondell Q&A Pt.3: A Tree Grows In Brooklyn, Condoms and Censorship Though I know that Joan Blondell and Ann Sothern were quite different as performers, they often played no-nonsense, wisecracking dames in lots of programmers — Blondell at WB, Sothern at Rko and then MGM. Now, Sothern became an A-list player at MGM in the late 1940s, after having been around for more than 15 years. Why didn't Blondell keep her leading lady status after the early 1940s? Did she refuse to sign any long-term contracts with the studios? There was a critical point in Joan's career in the late '30s and early '40s — after she left Warners and began freelancing — where opportunities were lost. The quality of roles offered at Columbia, MGM, and Universal, was no better than what she had at Warners. As she describes it, she wasn't a fighter for decent scripts the way Bette Davis was. »

- Andre Soares

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Joan Blondell Q&A Pt.3: A Tree Grows In Brooklyn, Condoms and Censorship

24 August 2011 7:34 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Ted Donaldson, Joan Blondell, Peggy Ann Garner, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn Joan Blondell Q&A Pt.2: Joan Blondell-Dick Powell-June Allyson Triangle, Lost Raunchy Pre-Coder Convention City My favorite Joan Blondell performance is her Aunt Sissy in Elia Kazan's 20th Century-Fox drama A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (1945). How did she get that role? What was it like for her to work with Kazan, Peggy Ann Garner, Dorothy McGuire, James Dunn? What did the film do for her career? And how in the world could she not have received an Academy Award nomination? (Especially considering that James Dunn won in the supporting category.) Did Fox push Dunn while ignoring Blondell? A Tree Grows in Brooklyn is a beautiful movie, and certainly Aunt Sissy is one of Joan's best performances. According to the sources I use in the book, a Fox contract was delivered to her »

- Andre Soares

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Joan Blondell Q&A with Biographer Matthew Kennedy: Warner Bros. Years, Rare The Blue Veil

24 August 2011 7:22 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Joan Blondell: A Life Between Takes: Introduction to Q&A with Joan Blondell biographer Matthew Kennedy Why Joan Blondell? Actually, this book idea originally came from Joan's son, Norman Powell, who is a director and producer. I was writing a biography of the director Edmund Goulding a few years back, and Norman interviewed me for a documentary he was making on Old Hollywood. When we were through filming, he said casually "Maybe you should do a biography of my mother next." Well, I knew his mother was Joan Blondell, and I was frankly stunned at the suggestion. I have admired her ever since Here Come the Brides, a show I watched religiously when I was a kid, and here was her son inviting me to tell her life story! I finished the Goulding book about a year later, then contacted Norman again to ask if he was serious. He was, »

- Andre Soares

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Joan Blondell: A Life Between Takes

24 August 2011 7:20 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Joan Blondell. Those who have heard the name will most likely picture either a blowsy, older woman playing the worldwise but warm-hearted saloon owner in the late 1960s television series Here Come the Brides, or a lively, fast-talking, no-nonsense, and unconventionally sexy gold digger in numerous Pre-Code Warner Bros. comedies and musicals of the early 1930s. Matthew Kennedy's Joan Blondell: A Life Between Takes (University Press of Mississippi, 2007) seeks to rectify that cultural memory lapse. Not that Blondell doesn't deserve to be remembered for Here Come the Brides or, say, Gold Diggers of 1933, Footlight Parade, Havana Widows, and Broadway Bad. It's just that her other work — from her immensely touching performance as a sexually liberated woman in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn to her invariably welcome (if brief) appearances in films as varied as The Blue Veil, Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter?, and Grease — should be remembered as well. »

- Andre Soares

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Elia Kazan: biggest rat of the pack

12 May 2011 4:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Star-maker, success, scoundrel – Elia Kazan defined his era. David Thomson marvels at the divisive subject of Martin Scorsese's new documentary

One way and another, in the middle decades of the 20th century, Elia Kazan became a central figure in American culture. He offered himself as the archetypal despised immigrant who had made it in the new world. He had been born in Istanbul in 1909 and he arrived in New York in 1913 as the son of a rug merchant. He was smart, hugely ambitious, drawn to women, and an inspiring conspirator (and betrayer) with guys. He went to a good school, Williams College in Massachusetts, but felt looked down on by the upper-class white girls. So he slept with them, and he excelled at every competitive urging. In the early 30s he apprenticed to the Group Theater as an actor, a possible director and a handyman who could fix physical problems – chairs, »

- David Thomson

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Today’s Special: For Mother’s Day, Our Moms’ Favorite Movies. Yours?

5 May 2011 11:43 AM, PDT | Disc Dish | See recent Disc Dish news »

With Mother’s Day coming on Sunday (for our U.S. readers), we wanted to celebrate movies that mothers love, but not just our idea of what they love. That’s right, the staff of Disc Dish gave their mothers a job to celebrate the holiday where their kids are supposed to do all the work! We asked our moms what their favorite films  are — and the results were fun, varied and even a bit provocative! See for yourself below.

And if you’re a mom, we want to know yours’ too. Tell us what your favorite movies are and why.

Today, as on every day, we thank our mothers for their enthusiasm, encouragement and awesome taste in movies!

Selma Chopinsky, mother of Irv Slifkin

Goldfinger (1964)

The third James Bond adventure is the one many claim is the best. It certainly has all the 007 elements going for it, from memorable »

- Laurence

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Outer Critics Circle Award Nominations Announced

26 April 2011 10:59 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

The 61st Outer Critics Circle Award nominations were announced this morning for outstanding stage achievements on Broadway and Off-Broadway. Here's the full list: Outstanding New Broadway Play Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo Good People The Motherf**ker With the Hat War Horse Outstanding New Broadway Musical The Book of Mormon Priscilla Queen of the Desert Sister Act Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown Outstanding New Off-broadway Play Blood From a Stone Kin Other Desert Cities The Other Place Outstanding New Off-broadway Musical Freckleface Strawberry In Transit The Kid Tomorrow Morning Outstanding New Score (Broadway or Off-Broadway) The Book of Mormon Catch Me If You Can Sister Act Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown Outstanding Revival Of A Play (Broadway or Off-Broadway) Born Yesterday The Importance of Being Earnest The Merchant of Venice The Normal Heart Outstanding Revival Of A Musical (Broadway or Off-Broadway) Anything Goes »

- MIKE FLEMING

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Understanding Scorsese: A Martin Scorsese Profile (Part 5)

5 April 2011 8:42 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Trevor Hogg profiles the career of legendary American filmmaker Martin Scorsese in the fifth of a five-part feature... read parts one, two, three and four.

“I didn’t think of it as Hong Kong. I reacted to what Bill Monahan put together in the script; I liked the idea,” explained American filmmaker Martin Scorsese when discussing The Departed (2006). “Taking from the Hong Kong trilogy of Andrew Lau‘s film [Infernal Affairs], that’s the device, the concept of the two informers. [I am] totally, whether I like it or not, drawn to stories that have to do with trust and betrayal. I found that I kept being drawn back to the script and to the project. It became something else.” Questioned about his shift from portraying Italian criminals to those of Irish heritage, the director observed, “The differences between different ethnic groups as gangsters, that’s purely technical.” Cast in the plot-twisting thriller are »

- flickeringmyth

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[DVD Review] Elia Kazan's America America

2 March 2011 8:30 PM, PST | JustPressPlay.net | See recent JustPressPlay news »

Legendary director Elia Kazan (A Tree Grows in Brooklyn; Gentlemen's Agreement; A Streetcar Named Desire; On the Waterfront; East of Eden) once said that, of all his films, this one was his favorite. That's not surprising when you consider how personal a project this was for him. America, America chronicles the true-life story of Elia Kazan's uncle, who suffered many setbacks during his arduous journey from his war-torn homeland to a new life in America.

Although the story deals with a very private and personal subject, Elia Kazan films it on an epic scale. The story spans several countries and many years. The film beautifully captures the obsessive determination of a man who will let nothing stop him from getting what he wants.  The story works on a grander scale than most of Kazan's other films, which are focused on a specific place. This is a character driven story »

- Rob Young

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[Movie Review] Elia Kazan's America America

2 March 2011 8:30 PM, PST | JustPressPlay.net | See recent JustPressPlay news »

Legendary director Elia Kazan (A Tree Grows in Brooklyn; Gentlemen's Agreement; A Streetcar Named DesireOn the Waterfront; East of Eden) once said that, of all his films, this one was his favorite. That's not surprising when you consider how personal a project this was for him. America, America chronicles the true-life story of Elia Kazan's uncle, who suffered many setbacks during his arduous journey from his war-torn homeland to a new life in America.

Although the story deals with a very private and personal subject, Elia Kazan films it on an epic scale. The story spans several countries and many years. The film beautifully captures the obsessive determination of a man who will let nothing stop him from getting what he wants.  The story works on a grander scale than most of Kazan's other films, which are focused on a specific place. This is a character driven story »

- Robert Young

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

10 items from 2011


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