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Film News: TCM Host & Film Historian Robert Osborne Dies at 84

New York City – Robert Osborne, one of the great film advocates and historians of our era, who hosted on Turner Classic Movies (TCM) with passionate skill from 1994 until recently, has passed away on March 6th, 2017, in New York City. The way that Mr. Osborne inspired film lovers everywhere was deep and influential. He was 84.

I was lucky enough to meet the man, naturally at a Chicago movie theater, back in 2005. Five years later, as I became a film reporter myself, I got to interview Ro via phone. He was the type of film man that you could spend a month with and never come to the end of his knowledge, and the way he shared it as the host on TCM was as if the finest uncle was giving us life lessons. Next to Roger Ebert, Robert Osborne is another reporter legend who galvanized my love for film.

King of the Classics: Robert Osborne,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Witness the Evolution of Cinematography with Compilation of Oscar Winners

This past weekend, the American Society of Cinematographers awarded Greig Fraser for his contribution to Lion as last year’s greatest accomplishment in the field. Of course, his achievement was just a small sampling of the fantastic work from directors of photography, but it did give us a stronger hint at what may be the winner on Oscar night. Ahead of the ceremony, we have a new video compilation that honors all the past winners in the category at the Academy Awards

Created by Burger Fiction, it spans the stunning silent landmark Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans all the way up to the end of Emmanuel Lubezki‘s three-peat win for The Revenant. Aside from the advancements in color and aspect ration, it’s a thrill to see some of cinema’s most iconic shots side-by-side. However, the best way to experience the evolution of the craft is by
See full article at The Film Stage »

Locarno Blog. Gene Tierney

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The Notebook is the North American home for Locarno Film Festival Artistic Director Carlo Chatrian's blog. Chatrian has been writing thoughtful blog entries in Italian on Locarno's website since he took over as Director in late 2012, and now you can find the English translations here on the Notebook as they're published. The Locarno Film Festival will be taking place August 2 - 12. We can begin with one of those anecdotes that are the stuff of Hollywood, marking the birth of a star and mapping out a whole career. Gene Tierney had already caught the eye of Anatole Litvak when aged only 17 and, after a happy period of study abroad (right here in Switzerland, in Lausanne), had been invited by a cousin to visit a Hollywood film set. But she took her father’s advice and turned down an offer from Warner Bros in favor of starting on the stage, on Broadway.
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‘Revenant’ Cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki Sets Record with Oscar Win

‘Revenant’ Cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki Sets Record with Oscar Win
With his best cinematography win for Alejandro G. Inarritu’s “The Revenant” Sunday night, lenser Emmanuel Lubezki entered the record books as the first director of photography to claim the prize three years in a row. He also won for “Gravity” and “Birdman.”

Lubezki was already in elite company with the “Birdman” win, joining an exclusive club whose ranks had not been breached in nearly two decades. Leon Shamroy (“Wilson,” “Leave Her to Heaven”), Winton Hoch (“Joan of Arc,” “She Wore a Yellow Ribbon”) and John Toll (“Legends of the Fall,” “Braveheart”) were the only other cinematographers to have won competitive Oscars in consecutive years, though Howard Greene received special commendations for color photography in its early days, for 1936’s “The Garden of Allah” and 1937’s “A Star is Born.” Both films were shot via the three-strip Technicolor process, with “Allah” being just the third film to use the technique
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oscar predictions: 'The Revenant' cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki will win record third in a row

Oscar predictions: 'The Revenant' cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki will win record third in a row
The American Society of Cinematographers awarded Emmanuel Lubezki his third consecutive win for “The Revenant.” Should he repeat at the Oscars, he’ll be the first person in history to win Best Cinematography three years in a row, and will be one away from tying Leon Shamroy and Joseph Ruttenberg for the most overall wins in this category. Shamroy prevailed for “The Black Swan” [1942], “Wilson” [1944], “Leave Her to Heaven” [1945], and “Cleopatra” [1963]. And Ruttenberg was crowned champ for “The Great Waltz” [1938], “Mrs. Miniver” [1942], “Somebody Up There Likes Me” [1956], and “Gigi” [1958]. -Break- Subscribe to Gold Derby Breaking News Alerts & Experts’ Latest Oscar Predictions Lubezki competes at the Oscars against Ed Lachman (“Carol”), three-time Oscar champ Robert Richardson (“The Hateful Eight&r...
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NYC Weekend Watch: Todd Haynes, ‘1941,’ ‘Gun Crazy,’ ‘Battleship Potemkin’ & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

The release of Carol (our coverage can be found here) brings “Todd Haynes: The Other Side of Dreams,” which will pair the director’s work with his personal favorites. Safe and Imitation of Life show on Friday; on Saturday, see “Todd Haynes: Rarities” — which brings Dottie Gets Spanked,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Predict Best Cinematography Oscar: Emmanuel Lubezki ('Revenant') could win three in a row

Predict Best Cinematography Oscar: Emmanuel Lubezki ('Revenant') could win three in a row
As we launch the Best Cinematography category in our Oscars predictions center, several people have a chance to make history at this year's ceremony. For instance, Emmanuel Lubezki has won the award for the last two years ("Gravity" in 2013, "Birdman" in 2014), and as the cinematographer for "The Revenant" this year he has a chance to go three-for-three, which would make him the first in Oscar history to win in three consecutive years. -Break- Experts' Oscar predictions update: 'Spotlight' pulls further ahead of 'Joy' with 'The Martian' rising fast As it stands, Lubezki is one of only four to have won back-to-back. The others were Leon Shamroy ("Wilson" in 1944, "Leave Her to Heaven" in 1945), Winton Hoch ("Joan of Arc" in 1948, "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon" in 1949) and John Toll ("Legends of the Fall" in 1994, "Braveheart" in 1995). It...
See full article at Gold Derby »

Beggars of Light: The Nitrate Picture Show 2015

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"The music seemed extraordinarily fresh and genuine still. It might grow old-fashioned, he told himself, but never old, surely, while there was any youth left in men. It was an expression of youth–that, and no more; with sweetness and foolishness, the lingering accent, the heavy stresses–the delicacy, too–belonging to that time."—"The Professor's House," Willa CatherHis last words, in a hospital four months later, are said to have been 'Mind your own business!' addressed to an enquirer after the state of his bowels. Friends got to the studio just before the wreckers' ball. Pictures, a profusion, piles of them, littered the floor: of 'a world that will never be seen except in pictures'"—"The Pound Era," Hugh Kenner***Heart Of FIREOften when I go to a movie, usually one made before 1960, I think about the opening scene of The Red Shoes, of Marius Goring and his
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Behind the Celluloid Curtain: #1 "The Lady with the Dog"

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This is the first letter in the first series of what will be an ongoing installment of correspondences between Scout Tafoya and Veronika Ferdman on the topic of Soviet cinema. Each series will be organized around a theme—director, genre, time period, mood or more whimsical connectors such as color or season. In short, the writers reserve the right to let Soviet cinema be their muse and guide the orientation of the letter writing. For this inaugural dispatch from the celluloid wonders of the Soviet bloc the subject can best be described as love in a time of discontent.Dear Veronika,I’m excited to be writing to you about the many, many undiscovered, unsung gems hiding in the vast canon of Russian cinema. There’s so much to cover that it’s frankly a little overwhelming to me. A whole world of movies I’ve never heard of just waiting to be watched.
See full article at MUBI »

NYC Weekend Watch: Free Classics, ‘Autumn Sonata,’ Georges Méliès, ‘Late Autumn’ & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

Want to see great movies for free? This Friday, Lincoln Center brings Film Foundation-restored titles to you at no cost. Ford‘s Drums Along the Mohawk, Scorsese‘s The King of Comedy, John M. Stahl‘s Leave Her to Heaven, Fosse‘s All That Jazz, Donen‘s Two for the Road,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Free films at the New York Film Festival by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2015-09-20 10:38:38

Robert De Niro stars with Jerry Lewis in Martin Scorsese's The King Of Comedy Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Bob Fosse's All That Jazz starring Roy Scheider with Ann Reinking and Ben Vereen; John Ford's Drums Along The Mohawk starring Henry Fonda and Claudette Colbert; John M. Stahl's Leave Her To Heaven with Gene Tierney and Cornel Wilde; Stanley Donen's Two For The Road with Albert Finney and Audrey Hepburn; Elia Kazan's Wild River starring Montgomery Clift and Lee Remick; and Martin Scorsese's The King Of Comedy with Robert De Niro and Jerry Lewis are the six free New York Film Festival Opening Day screenings.

Gene Tierney and Cornel Wilde in John M. Stahl's Leave Her To Heaven "shot in vibrantly beautiful Technicolor."

Robert Zemeckis’s The Walk in 3D, starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt as Philippe Petit with Ben Kingsley, Charlotte Le Bon and Ben Schwartz,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

New on Video: ‘Night and the City’

Night and the City

Written by Jo Eisinger

Directed by Jules Dassin

UK, 1950

Harry Fabian is probably the best at what he does, even if he is never very successful. Richard Widmark’s character in Night and the City, out now on a gorgeous new Criterion Collection Blu-ray, is a low-level con who works wherever he can, however he can, doing whatever he can to make a buck. He enters Jules Dassin’s 1950 film noir classic on the run; he will always be on the run: always hustling, always running. Sincere though his half-baked plans may be, he is perpetually—pathetically—down on his luck. He has the ambition, there’s no doubt about that, and as he shrewdly stumbles past one obstacle after another, it becomes almost humorous in the way he manages to charm his way through life, always just by the skin of his teeth. He cooks
See full article at SoundOnSight »

MGM's Lioness, the Epitome of Hollywood Superstardom, Has Her Day on TCM

Joan Crawford Movie Star Joan Crawford movies on TCM: Underrated actress, top star in several of her greatest roles If there was ever a professional who was utterly, completely, wholeheartedly dedicated to her work, Joan Crawford was it. Ambitious, driven, talented, smart, obsessive, calculating, she had whatever it took – and more – to reach the top and stay there. Nearly four decades after her death, Crawford, the star to end all stars, remains one of the iconic performers of the 20th century. Deservedly so, once you choose to bypass the Mommie Dearest inanity and focus on her film work. From the get-go, she was a capable actress; look for the hard-to-find silents The Understanding Heart (1927) and The Taxi Dancer (1927), and check her out in the more easily accessible The Unknown (1927) and Our Dancing Daughters (1928). By the early '30s, Joan Crawford had become a first-rate film actress, far more naturalistic than
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Read Martin Scorsese's Column on His Favorite Hollywood Leading Ladies

Read Martin Scorsese's Column on His Favorite Hollywood Leading Ladies
August means its 24-hour tribute season on TCM. In his monthly column, director and movie doyen (and, it turns out, witty columnist) Martin Scorsese singles out a few actresses whose work has affected him over the years, to complement Turner Classics' programming. On Gene Tierney, whose career is highlighted on August 1: Looking back at the pictures of the '30s and '40s, the period now known as the Golden Age of Hollywood, you can feel, more and more, just how controlled many of the performances were, especially in relation to movies made after the arrival of Brando and James Dean in the '50s. There's a tension between directors and actors that I find extremely interesting now. It's there in Tierney's performances for Preminger, Lubitsch and Mankiewicz, and in John Stahl's "Leave Her to Heaven" (not included in this tribute). In those pictures, her beauty was a kind of mask.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Cannes 2015. Day 4

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I keep waiting for a truly great film here in Cannes, an expectation and a hope for something really striking that is undoubtably a terrible attitude to take towards this festival and film in general. (Then again, a friend and Cannes regular, when I despondently shared these thoughts, told me that it is this hope that keeps her coming back, and that without it, indeed, why even go to the movies?) With this forlorn need haunting me by the fourth day, I was rightly chastised by the first of three films by the Portuguese director of Tabu, Miguel Gomes, in the Directors' Fortnight, a trilogy titled Arabian Nights. It is not a great film, but, abashed, I think it was the kind of film I needed, a lesson not to expect masterpieces, or perfection, but proof yet again that cinema is permeable, its beauties and faults can and should leak.
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The Noteworthy: 6 May 2015

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The poster for Apichatpong Weerasethakul's Cemetery of Splendour, bound for Cannes.Great news for fans of Louis Ck the actor and the director: the comedian-auteur is gearing up to make a new feature film, titled I'm a Cop.Producer Bero Beyer has been appointed the new General and Artistic Director of the International Film Festival Rotterdam Above: A vintage nitrate release print of John M. Stahl's Leave Her to Heaven. The print screened at the first ever Nitrate Picture Show at the George Eastman House last weekend. You'll hear more about this wonderful festival soon on the Notebook.A new issue of Film Comment is out, with many articles available online.That's Stanley Kubrick, above, talking to Jeremy Bernstein in 1965.At Reverse Shot, Nick Pinkerton considers under-appreciated French New Waver Luc Moullet's A Girl Is a Gun.Author F.X. Feeney has not one but two videos celebrating
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'Birdman' cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki joins exclusive club with Oscar win

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'Birdman' cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki joins exclusive club with Oscar win
By winning the Best Cinematography Oscar for a second year in a row, "Birdman" director of photography Emmanuel Lubezki has joined a truly elite club whose ranks haven't been breached in nearly two decades. Only four other cinematographers have won the prize in two consecutive years. The last time it happened was in 1994 and 1995, when John Toll won for Edward Zwick's "Legends of the Fall" and Mel Gibson's "Braveheart" respectively. Before that you have to go all the way back to the late '40s, when Winton Hoch won in 1948 (Victor Fleming's "Joan of Arc" with Ingrid Bergman) and 1949 (John Ford's western "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon"). Both victories came in the color category, as the Academy awarded prizes separately for black-and-white and color photography from 1939 to 1956. Leon Shamroy also won back-to-back color cinematography Oscars, for Henry King's 1944 Woodrow Wilson biopic "Wilson" and John M. Stahl
See full article at Hitfix »

Two Movies Starring (Inventor) Lamarr Coming Up on TCM

Hedy Lamarr: 'Invention' and inventor on Turner Classic Movies (photo: Hedy Lamarr publicity shot ca. early '40s) Two Hedy Lamarr movies released during her heyday in the early '40s — Victor Fleming's Tortilla Flat (1942), co-starring Spencer Tracy and John Garfield, and King Vidor's H.M. Pulham, Esq. (1941), co-starring Robert Young and Ruth Hussey — will be broadcast on Turner Classic Movies on Wednesday, November 12, 2014, at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. Pt, respectively. Best known as a glamorous Hollywood star (Ziegfeld Girl, White Cargo, Samson and Delilah), the Viennese-born Lamarr (née Hedwig Eva Maria Kiesler), who would have turned 100 on November 9, was also an inventor: she co-developed and patented with composer George Antheil the concept of frequency hopping, currently known as spread-spectrum communications (or "spread-spectrum broadcasting"), which ultimately led to the evolution of wireless technology. (More on the George Antheil and Hedy Lamarr invention further below.) Somewhat ironically,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Definitive Scary Scenes from Non-Horror Films: 50-41

In the spirit of October, this list will look at scary scenes, but not from the horror classics directed by Craven or Carpenter or even Hitchcock (I’m excluding him, though I argue most of his work isn’t exactly horror). These are from the films that aren’t really meant to scare you. At least, not at the visceral level that horror films do. These are the fifty definitive moments from non-horror films that still made an impact on the “frightening front.” From shocking to creepy to unsettlingly hair raising, these are moments that will stick in your mind long after watching the films, even if they are part of a very different narrative.

50. Toy Story 3 (2010)

Scene: Monkey Security

Video: http://youtu.be/x6QkcJjx-Vo

The third installment of the one of the greatest movie trilogies of all time is also one of the darkest children’s films ever made.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Poisoned Roses: Marilyn (and Others) Dazzle Us Deadly at Femmes Noir

Poisoned Roses: Marilyn (and Others) Dazzle Us Deadly at Femmes Noir
There are at least 26 good reasons to straighten your stocking seams, touch up your lip rouge, and queue up for Film Forum's Femmes Noir series, running from July 18 through August 7. Here are just three: Joan Crawford's long-suffering, pie-making matriarch in Mildred Pierce (July 18, 19 and 31); Gene Tierney's ravishing, murderous schemer — one possessed of the most stunning overbite known to man — in Leave Her to Heaven (July 20 and 21); and Jane Greer's predatory faux angel, who comes shimmering along in a saucer-shaped halo of a hat, in one of the most unsparing and bleakly beautiful of all films noir, Out of the Past (also July 20 and 21).

But of all the femmes vying for our attention here, perhaps the most willful and terrifying is p...
See full article at Village Voice »
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