IMDb > Leave Her to Heaven (1945)
Leave Her to Heaven
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Leave Her to Heaven (1945) More at IMDbPro »

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Leave Her to Heaven -- Trailer for this drama based on the novel

Overview

User Rating:
7.8/10   8,661 votes »
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Popularity: ?
Down 20% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Jo Swerling (screenplay)
Ben Ames Williams (novel)
Contact:
View company contact information for Leave Her to Heaven on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
January 1946 (USA) See more »
Tagline:
The sin she committed in the name of love could not be judged by man...or punished by law! See more »
Plot:
A writer falls in love with a young socialite and they are married soon after, but her obsessive love for him threatens to be the undoing of both them and everyone else around them. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Won Oscar. Another 4 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
"I'll never let you go. Never, never, never" See more (121 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Gene Tierney ... Ellen Berent Harland

Cornel Wilde ... Richard Harland

Jeanne Crain ... Ruth Berent

Vincent Price ... Russell Quinton

Mary Philips ... Mrs. Berent

Ray Collins ... Glen Robie

Gene Lockhart ... Dr. Saunders

Reed Hadley ... Dr. Mason

Darryl Hickman ... Danny Harland

Chill Wills ... Leick Thome
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Guy Beach ... Sheriff (unconfirmed) (uncredited)
Audrey Betz ... Cook at Robie's Ranch (uncredited)

Olive Blakeney ... Mrs. Louise Robie (uncredited)

Ruth Clifford ... Telephone Operator (uncredited)
Harry Depp ... Catterson - the Chemist (uncredited)

Paul Everton ... The Judge (uncredited)

Jim Farley ... Train Conductor (uncredited)
Betty Hannon ... Tess Robie (uncredited)

Kenner G. Kemp ... Lounge Car Train Passenger (uncredited)

Hugh Maguire ... Lin Robie (uncredited)

Mae Marsh ... Fisherwoman (uncredited)
Thomas Martin ... Court Clerk (uncredited)

Grant Mitchell ... Carlson (uncredited)

Milton Parsons ... Medcraft - Mortician (uncredited)

Addison Richards ... Bedford (uncredited)
Kay Riley ... Danny's Nurse (uncredited)
Earl Schenck ... Norton (uncredited)

Charles Tannen ... Man (uncredited)

Directed by
John M. Stahl 
 
Writing credits
Jo Swerling (screenplay)

Ben Ames Williams (novel)

Produced by
William A. Bacher .... producer
Darryl F. Zanuck .... executive producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Alfred Newman 
 
Cinematography by
Leon Shamroy (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
James B. Clark 
 
Art Direction by
Maurice Ransford 
Lyle R. Wheeler  (as Lyle Wheeler)
 
Set Decoration by
Thomas Little 
Ernest Lansing (uncredited)
 
Costume Design by
Kay Nelson 
 
Makeup Department
Ben Nye .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Sid Bowen .... unit manager (uncredited)
Raymond A. Klune .... production manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Joseph C. Behm .... assistant director (uncredited)
Otto Brower .... second unit director (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Roger Heman Sr. .... sound (as Roger Heman)
E. Clayton Ward .... sound
 
Visual Effects by
Fred Sersen .... special photographic effects
Sol Halperin .... transparency projection shots (uncredited)
Edwin Hammeras .... transparency projection shots (uncredited)
Edward Snyder .... transparency projection shots (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
E. Truman Joiner .... key grip (uncredited)
F. Bud Mautino .... second camera (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Sam Benson .... wardrobe supervisor (uncredited)
Eugene Joseff .... costume jeweller (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Lyman Hallowell .... apprentice editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Edward B. Powell .... orchestrator
Jay Chernis .... musician: violin (uncredited)
Alfred Newman .... musical director (uncredited)
Murray Spivack .... music mixer (uncredited)
Urban Thielmann .... musician: piano (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Natalie Kalmus .... technicolor director
Richard Mueller .... associate technicolor director
Darryl F. Zanuck .... presenter
Ruth Fox .... research assistant (uncredited)
Frances C. Richardson .... research director (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
110 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)
Certification:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The famous (and dramatic) swimming scene that takes place in the lake for Darryl Hickman's character was in water so cold that the young actor caught pneumonia.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: Ellen is watching Danny drown and she turns to see Richard coming toward the lake house, which is some distance away. However, when Richard jumps into the lake and begins swimming, Ellen and the boat are very nearby.See more »
Quotes:
Ellen Berent Harland:I keep forgetting you can't draw a deep breath without being heard all over the house!
Ellen Berent Harland:Let's change the name of the place from Back Of The Moon to Goldfish Manor.
See more »
Soundtrack:
Chickens in the GardenSee more »

FAQ

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24 out of 29 people found the following review useful.
"I'll never let you go. Never, never, never", 27 September 2008
Author: ackstasis from Australia

I don't think I agree with those who have designated 'Leave Her to Heaven (1945)' a film noir. This Technicolor picture – and it's surprising how much the presence of colour can distort the tone of a film – feels much closer to the claustrophobic domestic melodramas of the same period, such as Hitchcock's 'Rebecca (1940)' and 'Suspicion (1941),' and Cukor's 'Gaslight (1944).' But there's one important difference. By reversing the gender roles, and placing the power in the hands of the wife, director John M. Stahl here creates a formidable femme fatale, personified by the lovely and luminous Gene Tierney. The vibrant Technicolor photography is certainly pleasing to the eye, and the saturated colours add a perhaps-unintended touch of the surreal, but the dazzling colour palette distracts from and obstructs the film's darker themes. As much as I wouldn't like to deprive myself of Tierney's sparkling green eyes, I think that, in terms of atmosphere, 'Leave Her to Heaven' would have worked better in black-and-white.

The film starts off in the classic noir style: told in flashback, the story opens with popular author Richard Harland (Cornel Wilde), who meets an alluring woman, Ellen Berent (Tierney), on a train. Ellen quickly charms Richard with her dazzling looks and strong personality; soon, despite her own engagement to a prominent lawyer (Vincent Price), she has proposed their marriage, an offer he finds impossible to refuse. Here, 'Leave Her to Heaven' takes a distinct turn in storytelling approach, abruptly shifting its attention to Ellen's perspective, at which point we begin to recognise that perhaps she isn't as lovely as her new husband has been led to believe. The new couple move to Richard's secluded lakeside lodge, where they must also care for his crippled younger brother, Danny (Darryl Hickman, giving one of those "excited boy scout" child performances that were popular in the 1940s). As the weeks go by, Ellen's near-obsessive love for Richard begins to brood anger, hatred and jealousy, culminating in the cruelest of acts.

Tierney's character initially elicits an amount of sympathy, especially given Richard's apparent inability to recognise his wife's desperate need for privacy and intimacy in their relationship. However, it doesn't take long before her behaviour, fuelled by suspicion and paranoia, becomes entirely contemptible, and there's no longer any trace of the charming enchantress we saw in 'Laura (1944).' Ellen's psychosis is an intriguing one: she was obviously obsessed with love for her own father – what Freud called "feminine Oedipus attitude," or Electra complex – and, following his death, subsequently fell in love with Richard, who bears a remarkable resemblance to him. Such is her passion for her father, through Richard, that she cannot bear to share him with anybody; thus, her mania stems from the simple notion that "she loves too much." Ellen's murders are shocking in their own low-key simplicity, and Tierney, who received her only Oscar nomination for the role, carries out her evils with an icily-impassive face. But, geez, even this chilling portrayal can't make me stop loving her.

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