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'I Know Where I'm Going!' (1945)

Not Rated | | Drama, Romance | 9 August 1947 (USA)
Joan Webster is an ambitious and stubborn middle-class English woman determined to move forward since her childhood. She meets her father in a fancy restaurant to tell him that she will ... See full summary »
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'Nancy Franklin' was so overwhelmed by the film 'I Know Where I'm Going!' (1945) that she traveled from New York to the Western Isles of Scotland to see the places where it was made and to ... See full summary »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
Duncan MacKechnie ...
Capt. 'Lochinvar' (as Captain Duncan MacKechnie)
Ian Sadler ...
Iain
...
Torquil MacNeil
...
Ruairidh Mhór
Murdo Morrison ...
Kenny
Margot Fitzsimons ...
Bridie
C.W.R. Knight ...
Col. Barnstaple (as Captain C.W.R.Knight F.Z.S.)
Pamela Brown ...
Catriona
Donald Strachan ...
Shepherd
John Rae ...
Old Shepherd
Duncan McIntyre ...
His Son
Jean Cadell ...
Postmistress
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Storyline

Joan Webster is an ambitious and stubborn middle-class English woman determined to move forward since her childhood. She meets her father in a fancy restaurant to tell him that she will marry the wealthy middle-aged industrial Robert Bellinger in Kiloran island, in the Hebrides Islands, Scotland. She travels from Manchester to the island of Mull, where she stays trapped due to the windy weather. Whilst on the island, she meets Torquil McNeil and as the days go by they fall in love with each other. Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

island | love | dream | money | marriage | See All (133) »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

|

Release Date:

9 August 1947 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Ich weiß wohin ich gehe  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Budget:

£200,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In 1947 Emeric Pressburger met the head of the script department at Paramount, who told him that the studio used this film as an example of the perfect screenplay, and was shown to writers stuck for inspiration or who needed a lesson in screenwriting. See more »

Goofs

In the opening credits, as the factory gate swings shut the top bar on it is partially obscured by the hanging miniature that adds another floor to the factory - which is really the front offices of Denham Studios. See more »

Quotes

Torquil MacNeil: Still got those half starved hounds? How on earth do you manage to feed 'em?
Catriona Potts: Oh we live off the country. Rabbits, deer, a stray hiker or two.
See more »

Crazy Credits

'Torquil the Golden Eagle' .... Mr Ramshaw See more »

Connections

Featured in I Know Where I'm Going! Revisited (1994) See more »

Soundtracks

I Know Where I'm Going
(uncredited)
Traditional County Antrim song
Sung by Boyd Steven with The Glasgow Orpheus Choir
See more »

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User Reviews

 
Powell and Pressburger at their finest
14 February 2005 | by (Los Angeles) – See all my reviews

This wonderfully charming film from the Powell and Pressburger team is probably their most underrated great work: the most recent "Sight and Sound Critics Poll" of British films didn't even include this gem in the top 100. If it means anything, "Trainspotting" was in the top 10.

What elevates the film beyond other light-hearted romances is chiefly the impeccable acting and tight screenplay by Emeric Pressburger, probably the greatest English screenwriter to have ever lived. This might be generic laudation to any film, but by no means is Wendy Hiller's performance generic. As the young gold-digger-type woman, Hiller is slightly bewildered at being sidetracked to the Scottish natives, but she is much more fluxed when she realizes she is falling for a common Scotsman, and not the rich lord she envisioned. So what is the reaction to this bafflement? A fierce sense of panic that is very honest in its depiction of desperation. It might be puzzling to the viewer why our heroine should seek royalty so vehemently, but because of Hiller's expert frenzied facial tics, we see her slowly realize her ridiculousness herself. In an age where critics desire constant plausibility and "believability" in romances, Pressburger reminds us that attraction is something that can largely be out of our control. Hiller's character, an obsessive control freak, is the perfect example of one who cannot comprehend this fact.

The perfect foil for Hiller's hysteria, of course, is Rover Livesey's soft-spoken Torquil Macneil. Before Ashton Kucher-like effete twigs came to dominate on-screen masculinity (or Vin Diesel-like muscle-studded goons on the other extreme), the quiet dignity and charisma of a man like Livesey could light up a screen without any histrionics or wrestling moves. Those still looking for romantic realism will recognize that like Hiller's character, Livesey is just as strong-willed, and more importantly, is a match in wits and a counterbalance in earnest, world-weary personality. Their mutual attraction is perfectly played out in the strangely electric silences as much as the dialogue.

But the performances enhance what is already a remarkable script. The very basic premise of the love story can be read by many other astute reviewers on this website who also see the merits of this film. Powell and Pressburger have always been smart enough to embed their love stories with some heavy ideas: in "The Red Shoes," it was love vs. art; in "I Know Where I'm Going!" it is love vs. money. Sounds simple enough, but unlike other romances, these filmmakers can glean insights on the definition of poverty. While primitive (the one phone in town is at the post office) and poor (the staff in charge there can't break change for a pound), the villagers are portrayed affectionately with class, dignity, and culture, especially in a wonderful dance scene that seems to affectionately embody both a small community's close familiarity with one another, as well as the drunken festival spirit. Like Livesey's character says at one point in the film, "They aren't poor, they just haven't got any money." It's a succinct but revealing statement about the human condition in a time where money did not necessarily determine one's social class because of many other admirable factors. Contrast this cultural milieu with a film like "8 Mile," in which the characters are "real" if they are from the "streets" or living with trailer trash parents, and "phony" if they have an education from a private school, and you can see how our self-important attitudes are progressing.

Lastly, I must mention that this is one of the most exquisitely photographed black and white films I have ever seen, and the Criterion remastering does the film ample justice. I have been harping on the merits of the high-mindedness of Pressburger, but the appropriate plaudits must be dealt for Powell's emotionally expressive vistas that equal his achievements in "The Edge of the World." From the craggy peaks of the highest cliffs or the frothy waves of every bank, the film's mystic sense of ambiance is drawn by a foggy mist that pervades most scenes. For once, grand scenery doesn't dwarf the characters; every picturesque shot either captures the characters in the beauty of the element, or is intended as a complement to the characters' emotions. It's a great film.


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