MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Up 9,434 this week

The House on 92nd Street (1945)

6.8
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 6.8/10 from 1,770 users  
Reviews: 52 user | 23 critic

Bill Dietrich becomes a double agent for the FBI in a Nazi spy ring.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay), 2 more credits »
0Check in
0Share...

User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 26 titles
created 23 Oct 2010
 
a list of 23 titles
created 02 May 2011
 
a list of 27 titles
created 02 Sep 2011
 
a list of 26 titles
created 24 Jan 2012
 
a list of 29 titles
created 31 Jan 2012
 

Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: The House on 92nd Street (1945)

The House on 92nd Street (1945) on IMDb 6.8/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of The House on 92nd Street.
Won 1 Oscar. Another 1 win. See more awards »

Photos

Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
William Eythe ...
Bill Dietrich
...
...
Elsa Gebhardt
...
Charles Ogden Roper
...
Col. Hammersohn
Lydia St. Clair ...
Johanna Schmidt
William Post Jr. ...
Walker (as William Post)
Harry Bellaver ...
Max Cobura
Bruno Wick ...
Adolf Lange
Harro Meller ...
Conrad Arnulf
Charles Wagenheim ...
Gustav Hausmann
Alfred Linder ...
Adolf Klein
Renee Carson ...
Luise Vajda
Edit

Storyline

Preface: a stentorian narrator tells us that the USA was flooded with Nazi spies in 1939-41. One such tries to recruit college grad Bill Dietrich, who becomes a double agent for the FBI. While Bill trains in Hamburg, a street-accident victim proves to have been spying on atom-bomb secrets; conveniently, Dietrich is assigned to the New York spy ring stealing these secrets. Can he track down the mysterious "Christopher" before his ruthless associates unmask and kill him? Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

These were the hunted... this is the house... this is the picture! See more »


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

|

Release Date:

10 September 1945 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Now It Can Be Told  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The movie deals with the theft by German spies of the fictional "Process 97," a secret formula which, the narrator tells us, "was crucial to the development of the atomic bomb." The movie was released on September 10, 1945, only a month after the atomic bombs had been dropped on Japan, and barely a week after Japan's formal surrender. While making the film, the actors and director Henry Hathaway did not know that the atomic bomb existed, or that it would be incorporated as a story element in the movie. (None of the actors in the film mentions the atomic bomb.) However, co-director/producer Louis De Rochemont (who produced the "March of Time" newsreel films) and narrator Reed Hadley were both involved in producing government films on the development of the atomic bomb. (Hadley was present at the final test of the bomb in Los Alamos, New Mexico, in July, 1945.) After the bomb was dropped on Hiroshima, Hadley and screenwriter John Monks Jr. hastily wrote some additional voice-over narration linking "Process 97" to the atomic bomb, and Rochemont inserted it into the picture in time for the film's quick release. See more »

Goofs

When the agents are preparing to do the first survey of the house they are wearing CD (Civil Defense) arm bands on their right arms. The next scene shows them approaching the house and the arm bands are now on their left arms. See more »

Quotes

Bill Dietrich: How do I get in touch with Christopher?
Col. Hammersohn: Why?
Bill Dietrich: Well, he's my boss. I've never even met him.
Col. Hammersohn: Well, he's my boss too,
Bill Dietrich: Yeah?
Col. Hammersohn: I haven't met him either.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Opening credits are shown as someone flipping through the pages of a file. See more »

Connections

Spin-off The Street with No Name (1948) See more »

Soundtracks

You Say the Sweetest Things (Baby)
(uncredited)
Music by Harry Warren
Played as background music at the talent agent's office
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
FBI smashes Nazi spy ring in New York - Don't miss it!
28 November 1998 | by (Washington, DC) – See all my reviews

When this film was made in the 1940's, the ultimate evil that is Adolph Hilter and the Nazi movement was still a serious threat to our way of life. Lloyd Nolan, a major star of the 30's and 40's, gives his usual strong performance as FBI Agent Briggs, in charge of the Nazi spy case. Leo G. Carroll steals the movie playing the Nazi spymaster. Enjoy this film and remember why our fathers and grandfathers fought WWII. As a side note, real FBI agents appeared in this movie in support roles at the direction of J. Edgar Hoover, who gave his full co-operation to the producers.


27 of 30 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
Ridiculous ending Dire_Straits
Dead Nazi guy in the ambulance opened his eyes!! bettiegia
Satellite dishes in 1945? Phil_DePayne
The Last Line jglapin
Location of the 'House' nycmale99
Strange Map in Briggs' Office gvb0907
Discuss The House on 92nd Street (1945) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?