6.7/10
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12 user 1 critic

The House I Live In (1945)

Approved | | Short, Drama, Music | 9 November 1945 (USA)
Frank Sinatra teaches a group of young boys a lesson in religious tolerance.

Director:

(uncredited)

Writer:

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Won 1 Golden Globe. Another 2 wins. See more awards »
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Cast

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Storyline

A young Frank Sinatra is in the studio with a full orchestra. He records a take of "If You Are But a Dream," then breaks for a smoke. From the studio, he steps into an alley where he sees nearly a dozen kids chasing one smaller boy. Frank stops them, asks why, and they tell him it's because of the boy's religion. So Frank asks them if they're Nazis and explains a few things about America, blood banks, World War II, and teamwork. Then he sings "The House I Live In" for them. Off the lads scamper, and the kid Frank's saved gives him a look of gratitude. Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Short | Drama | Music

Certificate:

Approved
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Details

Country:

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Release Date:

9 November 1945 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Éste es mi hogar  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The lyrics to the song "The House I Live In" were written by Abel Meeropol, author of "Strange Fruit" made famous by Billie Holiday. He is credited as Lewis Allan because of the black list. When he saw the film for the first time he walked out because the line in his lyric "my neighbors white and black" was not included in the film. See more »

Connections

Featured in Italians in America (1998) See more »

Soundtracks

If You Are But a Dream
(uncredited)
Written by Moe Jaffe, Jack Fulton, and Nat Bonx
Performed by Frank Sinatra
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User Reviews

 
A very touching film about prejudice....with perhaps too much singing.
18 August 2009 | by (Bradenton, Florida) – See all my reviews

Frank Sinatra starred in this odd little short from RKO that is now in the public domain. The film came out at about the same time the war ended and is a nice plea for religious tolerance.

The film begins with Sinatra on stage singing. After leaving the stage, he walks out into the alley and finds a group of kids picking on another because of his religion. Instead of yelling at the boys (or helping them for that matter), Sinatra delivers a nice civics lesson on religious toleration and equates prejudice with fascism. The kids seem to get the lesson but then, out of the blue, Sinatra begins singing a song that, frankly (get it?), kids would have hated. He had a lovely voice but unfortunately I think this detracted from the excellent message he gave to the kids about tolerance. It's a case of a good message with too much singing--even if the guy singing is Frank Sinatra. It's also an interesting curio--a nice historical piece that is often overlooked...plus it's quite touching even if it seems a bit schmaltzy.


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