6.2/10
176
10 user 5 critic

The Hidden Eye (1945)

Blind detective Duncan Maclaine relies on his working senses to piece together an assortment of clues to solve a case of murder.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Capt. Duncan Maclain
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...
Phillip Treadway
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William 'Bill' Phillips ...
Marty Corbett
Thomas E. Jackson ...
Insp. Delaney (as Thomas Jackson)
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Ferris
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Stormvig
Francis Pierlot ...
Kossovsky
Sondra Rodgers ...
Helen Roberts
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Gibbs - Chauffeur
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Louie
Raymond Largay ...
Arthur Hampton (as Ray Largay)
Leigh Whipper ...
Alistair
...
Burton Lorrison
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Storyline

Blind detective Duncan Maclaine relies on his working senses to piece together an assortment of clues to solve a case of murder.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

New adventures of the blind detective and his seeing eye dog!

Genres:

Mystery

Certificate:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

2 January 1946 (Sweden)  »

Also Known As:

Det dolda ögat  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This film's initial telecast took place in Los Angeles Tuesday 15 October 1957 on KTTV (Channel 11), followed by Philadelphia Monday 2 December 1957 on WFIL (Channel 6); it was first aired in New York City 19 February 1959 on WCBS (Channel 2), followed by San Francisco 20 October 1959 on KGO (Channel 7). See more »

Connections

Follows Eyes in the Night (1942) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Disappointing B Movie
31 January 2006 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

I had hopes for this one, as it was written by a real mystery writer -- George Harmon Coxe, and featured Edward Arnold, who is incapable of a bad performance.

Problem is -- the story really isn't a mystery, as the killer is revealed about halfway through the film. And, while Arnold does the best he can with so-so material, the romantic leads and the comic "relief" is dreadful. One ultimately does not care whether the male lead did or did not execute the strange series of killings featured in the movie, as he is such a cold fish. As a matter of fact, when the police takes him down to the station "to clear up one or two things", one kind of hopes that they broke out the rubber hoses.

Arnold plays a blind detective, and the film is full of the uncanny sensitivity blind detectives always have in fiction. While most of this is hooey, Arnold does convey a sort of odd remoteness that absolutely appropriate for his character. More improbably, Arnold -- who creditably played Nero Wolfe ten years earlier -- is shown as an expert wrestler.

Seriously, this one is for Edward Arnold freaks only. And if one is hungry for Arnold performances, one can get them in many, many better movies.


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