5.9/10
127
7 user 3 critic

George White's Scandals (1945)

Approved | | Comedy, Music | 18 February 1946 (Sweden)
This Broadway revue is about two love affairs. The romance between the comedienne Joan Mason and Jack Evans of Boston is easily disturbed by Jack's cynical sister, Clara Belle Evans, who is... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay) (as Hugh Wedlock), (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Credited cast:
...
...
...
Tom McGrath
Martha Holliday ...
Jill Martin
Ethel Smith ...
Hit Parade Swing Organist
...
Clarabelle Evans
...
...
Billie Randall (as Bettejane Greer)
Audrey Young ...
Maxine Manner
Rose Murphy ...
Hilda - Joan's Maid
...
Montescu
Beverly Wills ...
Joan, as a Child
...
Gene Krupa (as Gene Krupa His Drums and His Band)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Effie Laird ...
Scrubwoman (scenes deleted)
...
Mother (scenes deleted)

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Storyline

This Broadway revue is about two love affairs. The romance between the comedienne Joan Mason and Jack Evans of Boston is easily disturbed by Jack's cynical sister, Clara Belle Evans, who is against their relationship. The romance between the wealthy British Jill Martin and Tom McGrath, the assistant to the impresario George White Brodway is a love hate relationship. Gene Krupa and his band keep, together with the virtuoso organist Ethel Smith, both couples dancing a lot. Written by Robert

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Always a tradition on the stage...now a sensation on the screen! See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Music

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

18 February 1946 (Sweden)  »

Also Known As:

George White's Scandals of 1945  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Jack Haley's and Margaret Hamilton's only screen appearance together other than The Wizard of Oz (1939). See more »

Goofs

Joan Mason is seated in her dressing room, holding a cup and saucer. She tosses away the cup, which shatters on a door, but in the next shot it is back in the saucer. See more »

Crazy Credits

Opening credits are shown on curtains pulled on stage by ladies, as the ladies walk across stage. See more »

Connections

Featured in Make Mine Laughs (1949) See more »

Soundtracks

How'd You Get Out of My Dreams?
(uncredited)
Music by Sammy Fain
Lyrics by Jack Yellen
Played during the opening credits and sung at the beginning
Played occasionally by Gene Krupa and His Orchestra during routines
Danced by Martha Holliday
See more »

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User Reviews

 
Escape to 1945
6 February 2012 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

I gave this film "5" out of "10", but there's a caveat.

The movie itself might be described anywhere along the continuim, from "Awful" to "Excellent", depending on what the viewer is looking for. My rating is purely arbitrary.

It's total escapist fare, one of hundreds of films ground out during WWII to divert the American people from the horrors of war for an hour or two, and it must have done its job. It's certainly diverting.

But what it is, more than anything else, is a time capsule of the fashions, manners and mores of a particular time and place. It is the year 1945 preserved in amber, and it was completely dated by 1947.

From the showgirls in the musical numbers - pompadoured, lacquered and outrageously costumed in what looks like whatever the wardrobe department had left over, to the irrepressible Joan Davis dressed to the nines and beyond in shoulder pads, sequins and hair, hair, hair - this picture is a never-ending parade of "What Not to Wear", '40's style, and it's a hoot.

Add a couple of silly romantic sub-plots and the slinky Jane Greer as the backstage back-stabber, and you have the whole package. There's even leading man Phillip Terry - briefly married to Joan Crawford in real life, and the scene-stealing Margaret Hamilton thrown in for good measure. And believe me, anyone who can steal a scene from Joan Davis and Jack Haley in their prime is guilty of grand theft thespeus.

So there you have it. This one is not likely to show up on AFI's list of anything. If you're looking for a Golden Age musical, this isn't it. But if you're in the mood to spend a little time watching how your grandparents did it, this one's for you.


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