IMDb > Fallen Angel (1945)
Fallen Angel
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Fallen Angel (1945) More at IMDbPro »

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Fallen Angel -- Trailer for this black and white, dramatic classic

Overview

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7.2/10   2,441 votes »
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Down 8% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Harry Kleiner (screen play)
Marty Holland (novel)
Contact:
View company contact information for Fallen Angel on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
5 December 1945 (USA) See more »
Tagline:
Entertainment that all but explodes with dramatic tension! See more »
Plot:
A slick con man arrives in a small town looking to make some money, but soon gets more than he bargained for. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
User Reviews:
This should be a hotly pursued video See more (56 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

Alice Faye ... June Mills

Dana Andrews ... Eric Stanton

Linda Darnell ... Stella

Charles Bickford ... Mark Judd
Anne Revere ... Clara Mills

Bruce Cabot ... Dave Atkins

John Carradine ... Professor Madley
Percy Kilbride ... Pop
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Dorothy Adams ... Stella's Neighbor (uncredited)
Robert Adler ... Coroner at Murder Scene (uncredited)
Herbert Ashley ... Reporter (uncredited)

Matthew 'Stymie' Beard ... Shoeshine Boy (uncredited)
Betty Boyd ... Bank Clerk (uncredited)
Paul E. Burns ... News Vendor (uncredited)
Chick Collins ... 2nd Bus Driver (uncredited)
Jimmy Conlin ... Walton Hotel Clerk (uncredited)
Franklyn Farnum ... Man Leaving Drugstore (uncredited)
Gus Glassmire ... San Francisco Hotel Clerk (uncredited)
William Haade ... 1st Bus Driver (uncredited)
Dick Haymes ... Himself - JukeBox Vocalist (voice) (uncredited)
Olin Howland ... Joe Ellis (uncredited)
Adele Jergens ... Woman at Madley's Show (uncredited)
Tiny Jones ... Woman at Madley's Show (uncredited)
J. Farrell MacDonald ... Bank Guard (uncredited)
George Magrill ... Cop at Murder Scene (uncredited)
Leila McIntyre ... Bank Clerk (uncredited)
Mira McKinney ... Mrs. Judd (uncredited)
Dave Morris ... Reporter (uncredited)
Horace Murphy ... Sheriff (uncredited)
William H. O'Brien ... Bus Passenger (uncredited)
Frank O'Connor ... Man at Madley's Show (uncredited)
Broderick O'Farrell ... Policeman (uncredited)
Garry Owen ... Waiter (uncredited)
Paul Palmer ... Detective (uncredited)
Harry Strang ... Policeman (uncredited)
Brick Sullivan ... Honky Tonk Dance Customer (uncredited)
Hal Taggart ... Man at Madley's Show (uncredited)
Hal Taliaferro ... Officer Gus Johnson (uncredited)
Max Wagner ... Bartender (uncredited)
Martha Wentworth ... Hotel Maid (uncredited)
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Directed by
Otto Preminger 
 
Writing credits
Harry Kleiner (screen play)

Marty Holland (novel)

Produced by
Otto Preminger .... producer
 
Original Music by
David Raksin 
 
Cinematography by
Joseph LaShelle (director of photography) (as Joseph La Shelle)
 
Film Editing by
Harry Reynolds 
 
Art Direction by
Leland Fuller 
Lyle R. Wheeler  (as Lyle Wheeler)
 
Set Decoration by
Thomas Little 
 
Costume Design by
Bonnie Cashin 
 
Makeup Department
Ben Nye .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Raymond A. Klune .... production manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Otto Brower .... second unit director (uncredited)
Tom Dudley .... assistant director (uncredited)
George Schaefer .... assistant director (uncredited)
Sam Wurtzel .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Helen Hansard .... associate set decorator
 
Sound Department
Bernard Freericks .... sound
Harry M. Leonard .... sound
 
Visual Effects by
Fred Sersen .... special photographic effects
Sol Halperin .... transparency projection shots (uncredited)
Edward Snyder .... transparency projection shots (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Lloyd Ahern .... second camera (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Emil Newman .... musical director
Charles Althouse .... music mixer (uncredited)
Arthur Morton .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Paul Neal .... music mixer (uncredited)
Murray Spivack .... music mixer (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Teresa Brachetto .... script supervisor (uncredited)
May Morris .... research assistant (uncredited)
Frances C. Richardson .... research director (uncredited)
 

Production CompaniesDistributors
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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
98 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Australia:PG | Finland:K-16 | UK:PG (DVD rating) | UK:A (original rating) | USA:Approved (PCA #10940)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
According to Wade Williams in "Biography: Alice Faye: The Star Next Door" (1996), when Alice Faye saw a rough cut of the film and realized that Otto Preminger's editing had diminished the impact of her performance in favor of newcomer Linda Darnell, she got up from the screening, drove off the 20th Century Fox lot, threw her dressing room key to the security guard, and vowed never to work for the studio again.See more »
Goofs:
Factual errors: Among the works listed on the church reader board for June Mills's upcoming organ recital are a Stabat Mater by Beethoven and a Requiem by Brahms. Beethoven never wrote a Stabat Mater, and the only Requiem by Brahms is a massive choral work, highly unlikely to be played as an organ solo.See more »
Quotes:
[repeated line]
Mark Judd:You gave her the watch.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
PaducahSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
40 out of 47 people found the following review useful.
This should be a hotly pursued video, 3 June 2004
Author: yardbirdsraveup from Connecticut

There is so much to say about the way Otto Preminger directs a movie. His previous success, "Laura" (1944), was a blockbuster, but lacked the murky influence of film noir that was so popular during this time. Sure there was some film noir technique employed in "Laura", but not enough. However, "Laura" still holds it's own even by today's standards and the media, along with the marketing people, have done us all a favor (this time!!!) in keeping this classic alive and popular.

Needless to say, "Fallen Angel" redeems Preminger's ability to present a film in the classic noir of it's time and because of this is competitive with Billy Wilder's "Lost Weekend" (1945) and "Double Indemnity" (1944), both huge successes with audiences. But what about "Fallen Angel"?

Despite the cinematography and the super cast, "Fallen Angel" went to the chopping block via the critics. The critics rated this film as mediocre and audiences stayed away. Alice Faye, in her only dramatic role, left the movies in disgust partly because of what the critics did to this film. Why?

From beginning to end, the viewer is treated to some of the best cinematography that this art form had to offer. The way sluttish Linda Darnell is depicted before the camera is a treat for the eye and enhances her sexuality. The way Percy Kilbride is smitten with Darnell throughout the movie, up to the climax is an essential link to the continuity of the movie as well as with the novel by Marty Holland. The way Charles Bickford sits behind the lunch counter, slowly sipping his coffee sending a message to the viewer that something deep inside him is simmering, ready to explode. We all know that Bickford, along with Kilbride, Dana Andrews and Bruce Cabot all are victims to the whims of the dark Darnell.

And the way the blonde, good and virtuous Faye is contrasted with the dark, bad and selfish Darnell is more proof that this film should be marketed for the masses. The plot is strong, the camera work of Joseph LaShelle and, especially the film direction by Preminger rates this movie as one of the best of it's time.

Yes, this film rates up there with "Laura", "Double Indemnity" and "The Lost Weekend"; all three super classics from this era and available on VHS and DVD. Why not "Fallen Angel"?

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Did anyone else think.... (SPOILER) ivn0716
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