Children of Paradise (1945) - News Poster

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Video Essay. The Brotherhood of Opale

  • MUBI
The 23rd entry in an on-going series of audiovisual essays by Cristina Álvarez López and Adrian Martin. Mubi is showing Jean Renoir's The Testament of Dr. Cordelier (1959) is August 3 - September 2, 2017 in the United States as part of the series Jean Renoir.Jean Renoir’s The Experiment of Dr. Cordelier (a.k.a. The Doctor’s Horrible Experiment, 1959), shot using the multi-camera set-up of a television production, is a free variation on Robert Louis Stevenson’s immortal tale, Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886). However, Renoir’s take on this material owes less to the horror genre than to a kind of speculative, philosophical fiction. Unlike in most screen versions of the Jekyll/Hyde duality, Renoir goes easy on the conventional distinction between the good and evil sides of a single personality. Yes, the figure of Opale, into whom Cordelier transforms himself, is destructive, bestial, cruel, and sadistic.
See full article at MUBI »

How Often Do Foreign-Language Films Score Screenwriting Oscar Nominations Or Wins?

Toni Erdmann’ (Courtesy: Tiff)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

It’s not too often that foreign-language films get recognized for anything at the Oscars beyond the best foreign-language film category — but it does happen. And, believe it or not, it happens more for best original screenplay and best adapted screenplay than many other categories. A prime example of that is Toni Erdmann, Germany’s submission this year that is proving to be a cross-category threat, which could score a nomination — or a win — for its writing.

The story of Toni Erdmann — which has a solid Rotten Tomatoes score of 91% — follows a father who is trying to reconnect with his adult daughter after the death of his dog. It sounds simple enough but, of course, the two couldn’t be more unalike. The film premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016 and where it won the Fipresci Prize. Since then, it
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

The Forgotten: Jean Delannoy's "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" (1956)

  • MUBI
The Lon Chaney silent The Hunchback of Notre Dame is an important document, and a pretty good movie, especially if you can see it projected. William Dieterle's 1939 film with Charles Laughton is an outright classic, with iconic casting in every role, but in a way it, like its predecessor, is as much a travesty of Victor Hugo's story as the Disney version. Tragedy is softened, hard edges blurred. (And actually there's a lot to admire in the cartoon: an epic cinematic scale and vision, use of humor that doesn't actually wreck the serious aspects. It's just that, starting with Quasimodo not being deaf—because he has to sing, you see—means you're not filming Notre-Dame de Paris by Victor Hugo at all.)So it was perhaps inevitable that the French would one day have to show us how it's done, and present a more faithful rendering of the book.
See full article at MUBI »

J’accuse (1938)

World War, a solemn vow, and a promise betrayed lead to a ‘night of the living war dead’ – all cooked up by the director of Napoleon, Abel Gance. The early, famed pacifist fantasy is back in near-perfect condition and restored to its full length. It’s a reworking, not a remake, of Gance’s 1919 silent classic.

J’accuse

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1938 / B&W / 1:37 flat full frame / 120 min. / That They May Live; J’accuse: Fresque tragique des temps modernes vue et Réalisée par Abel Gance / Street Date November 15, 2016 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98

Starring Victor Francen, Line Noro, Marie Lou, Jean-Max, Paul Amiot, Jean-Louis Barrault, Marcel Delaitre, Renée Devillers, Romuald Joubé, André Nox, Georges Rollin, Georges Saillard.

Cinematography Roger Hubert

Film Editor Madeleine Crétoile

Original Music Henri Verdun

Written by Abel Gance, Steve Passeur

Produced & Directed by Abel Gance

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Around 1973, UCLA film school professor Bob Epstein
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘Greetings’: Brian De Palma’s Splintering of Masculinity

“This is a pretty good land, a fact” was proclaimed by President Lyndon B. Johnson in a television broadcast addressing the Vietnam War — the leader of the free world backing up a “humble” if contentious wording of his nation’s state with an absolute, and thus already opening up the possibility of not just satire, but images as the ultimate medium for telling lies. Perhaps it was the ultimate “prologue” for a 28-year-old Brian De Palma.

With the mission statement of setting out to make something akin to Jean-Luc Godard’s ’60s work, De Palma’s third feature, Greetings, still feels surprisingly his own; his preoccupations already so dominant that it doesn’t come off as a banalization of Godard’s aesthetics and ideas the way so many other rip-offs did. Perhaps the difference is that it’s based in a very personal milieu, situated around three New York buddies
See full article at The Film Stage »

Catherine Deneuve to Receive the 2016 Lumière Award

Catherine Deneuve to Receive the 2016 Lumière Award
Paris — Legendary French actress Catherine Deneuve will receive the 8th Lumière Award at France’s 2016 Lumière Grand Lyon Film Festival, a unique event which focuses near totally on film classics.

Clint Eastwood, Quentin Tarantino, Pedro Almodovar and Martin Scorsese figure among past recipients of the Lumière Award. They all travelled to Lyon to pick up the award, granted by Lyon’s Institut Lumière, run by French director Bertrand Tavernier and Cannes head Thierry Fremaux.

“This year’s Lumière Award goes to Catherine Deneuve for what she is, has done, says, acts, sings and delights from time immemorial and forever,” the Institut Lumière said Monday in a press statement.

“The face of French cinema,” according to Scorsese, Deneuve’s career is remarkable for its longevity, great films, the directors she has worked with, and the contrasting facets of a figure which confounds easy categorisation.

Deneuve began making films before France’s Nouvelle Vague,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Movie Poster of the Week: The Character Posters of “Doctor Zhivago”

  • MUBI
Fifty years ago this week, on December 22, 1965, David Lean’s Doctor Zhivago had its world premiere at the Capitol Theatre in New York. Contrary to current practices, it was reviewed in The New York Times the following day. (In his first paragraph the redoubtable Bosley Crowther notably refers to it as “Robert Bolt’s dramatization of Boris Pasternak’s Doctor Zhivago” rather than Lean’s, though he later mentions the “skillful direction of David Lean.” No auteurist, he.)The Capitol, which had stood on Broadway just north of Times Square since 1919, was one of New York’s first movie palaces, and was a flagship theater for MGM. It was the theater in which the Wizard of Oz had its first New York run and in 1964 it was converted for the presentation of Cinerama films. (It closed in 1968 not long after the premiere of 2001: A Space Odyssey.) All of which
See full article at MUBI »

Disc Deals: 50% Off Criterion Blu-rays at Amazon

The Barnes & Noble sale may have ended a couple of weeks ago, but that doesn’t mean that you can’t still buy some Criterion Collection releases for 50% off. Best Buy is currently having a 50% off sale on a number of Criterion releases, and Amazon has begun to match their prices.

Thanks to everyone for supporting our site by buying through our affiliate links.

A note on Amazon deals, for those curious: sometimes third party sellers will suddenly appear as the main purchasing option on a product page, even though Amazon will sell it directly from themselves for the sale price that we have listed. If the sale price doesn’t show up, click on the “new” options, and look for Amazon’s listing.

I’ll keep this list updated throughout the week, as new deals are found, and others expire. If you find something that’s wrong, a broken link or price difference,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Marrakech: Jeunet’s Next Movie To Explore Sex and Sensuality with ‘Amelie’ Spirit

Marrakech: Jeunet’s Next Movie To Explore Sex and Sensuality with ‘Amelie’ Spirit
Marrakech — French helmer Jean-Pierre Jeunet, (“Amelie,” “The Young and Prodigious T.S. Spivet”) is prepping a new feature film, co-scripted with his long-time collaborator, Guillaume Laurant, in which he’ll explore the theme of sex and sensuality, in a universe that is reminiscent of the spirit of “Amelie.”

Talking at Marrakech, he said he’s been pondering making a film about this topic for several years. His recent experience of directing the pilot episode of TV series “Casanova” for Amazon Studios whetted his appetite for directing another film about sex and sensuality, but this time in a more quirky and idiosyncratic manner.

“’Casanova’ was obviously a bit about sex, and I loved directing this historical costume drama. It made me want to make another film about this subject. But with a different approach. I want to make something that is original and explores sexuality and sensuality, using fantasy and imagination.”

Casanova” sported a $10 million budget,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Allen Ginsberg’s 10 Favorite Films

Before its flame was extinguished, New York’s legendary Kim’s Video contributed further to the world of cinephilia by polling better-known customers about their favorite films. One of these customers happened to be Allen Ginsberg, a figure whose relative lack of experience in cinema certainly won’t stand as any sort of qualifier. Thanks to The Allen Ginsberg Project (via Open Culture), we can now get a wider — and, to our eyes, more immediately understandable — grasp of what made this generation-defining voice tick.

Two interests — French Poetic Realism and the work of (or at least work heavily relating to) his fellow Beat poets — announce themselves rather clearly, given the fact that they arguably occupy 90% of the final list. The sole “outsider” is Battleship Potemkin, a picture that, with fierce political intentions and poetic inclinations in its cutting, nevertheless makes perfect sense as a Ginsberg favorite. Some of these are
See full article at The Film Stage »

Remembering Actress and Pioneering Woman Producer Delorme: Unique Actress/Woman Director Collaboration

Danièle Delorme: 'Gigi' 1949 actress and pioneering female film producer. Danièle Delorme: 'Gigi' 1949 actress was pioneering woman producer, politically minded 'femme engagée' Danièle Delorme, who died on Oct. 17, '15, at the age of 89 in Paris, is best remembered as the first actress to incarnate Colette's teenage courtesan-to-be Gigi and for playing Jean Rochefort's about-to-be-cuckolded wife in the international box office hit Pardon Mon Affaire. Yet few are aware that Delorme was featured in nearly 60 films – three of which, including Gigi, directed by France's sole major woman filmmaker of the '40s and '50s – in addition to more than 20 stage plays and a dozen television productions in a show business career spanning seven decades. Even fewer realize that Delorme was also a pioneering woman film producer, working in that capacity for more than half a century. Or that she was what in French is called a femme engagée
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Warners’ Special Effects Blu-ray Collection

I'll trade you two RKOs for two Warners', an even swap! This quartet of movie-magic wonderments offer a full course on old-school film effects wizardry at its best. Willis O'Brien passes the baton to disciple Ray Harryhausen, who dazzles us with his own effects magic for the first '50s giant monster epic. And the best monster thriller of the decade is offered at its original widescreen aspect ratio. It's all special enough to merit a mid-week review. Special Effects Collection Blu-ray The Son of Kong, Mighty Joe Young, The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms, Them! Warner Home Video 1933-1954 / B&W / 1:37 Academy - 1:85 widescreen / 335 min. / Street Date October 27, 2015 / 54.96 or 19.98 separately Starring Robert Armstrong, Helen Mack,, Frank Reicher, Victor Wong; Robert Armstrong, Terry Moore, Ben Johnson, Frank McHugh; Paul Christian, Paula Raymond, Cecil Kellaway, Kenneth Tobey, Donald Woods, Lee Van Cleef; James Whitmore, Edmund Gwenn, Joan Weldon, James Arness, Onslow Stevens,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Criterion Picks On Fandor: Eight French Films

Each week, the fine folks at Fandor add a number of films to their Criterion Picks area, which will then be available to subscribers for the following twelve days. This week, the Criterion Picks focus on eight delightful French films.

Three decades of exceptional French cinema in the service of that most intoxicating, unpredictable and stubborn of muscles, to which laws of convention and commitment prove no barrier: the heart.

Don’t have a Fandor subscription? They offer a free trial membership.

Children of Paradise by Marcel Carne

Poetic realism reached sublime heights with Children Of Paradise, widely considered one of the greatest French films of all time. This nimble depiction of nineteenth-century Paris’s theatrical demimonde, filmed during World War II, follows a mysterious woman loved by four different men (all based on historical figures): an actor, a criminal, a count, and, most poignantly, a mime (Jean-Louis Barrault,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Blu-ray Review “Day For Night” (1973; Directed by François Truffaut) (The Criterion Collection)

  • CinemaRetro
“The Movie For Movie Lovers”

By Raymond Benson

François Truffaut had an all too short but certainly brilliant career as a filmmaker. He began in the world of film criticism in France, but in the late 1950s he decided to make movies himself. Truffaut quickly shot to the forefront of the French New Wave in the late 1950s and early 60s, alongside the likes of Jean-Luc Godard, Eric Rohmer, Alain Resnais, and others. By the time the 70s rolled around, Truffaut was a national treasure in France and a mainstay in art house cinemas in the U.S. and Britain.

His 1973 masterpiece, Day for Night (in France La Nuit Américaine, or “American Night”), won the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film of that year, the only time Truffaut picked up an Academy Award. Due to odd eligibility rules, the picture could be nominated for other categories the following year. For
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Daily | Carné, Doillon, Petri

In his latest delightful entry, the Austrian Film Museum's Christoph Huber considers a couple of unconventional editing techniques born of necessity. Under consideration here are Jean-Luc Godard's Breathless (1960) and, by way of Raoul Walsh's The Roaring Twenties (1939), Robert Rossen’s All the King’s Men (1949). Also in today's roundup of news and views: Books on Zhang Yimou and Alfred Hitchcock, Marcel Carné’s Les Enfants du paradis at 70, interviews with Jacques Doillon, Peter Strickland, Veronika Lisková, Jan Soldat, Stine Marie Jacobsen, Adam Curtis, Chuck Palahniuk, Desiree Akhavan, Ira Sachs, Ben Stiller and more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Daily | Carné, Doillon, Petri

In his latest delightful entry, the Austrian Film Museum's Christoph Huber considers a couple of unconventional editing techniques born of necessity. Under consideration here are Jean-Luc Godard's Breathless (1960) and, by way of Raoul Walsh's The Roaring Twenties (1939), Robert Rossen’s All the King’s Men (1949). Also in today's roundup of news and views: Books on Zhang Yimou and Alfred Hitchcock, Marcel Carné’s Les Enfants du paradis at 70, interviews with Jacques Doillon, Peter Strickland, Veronika Lisková, Jan Soldat, Stine Marie Jacobsen, Adam Curtis, Chuck Palahniuk, Desiree Akhavan, Ira Sachs, Ben Stiller and more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | Carné, Doillon, Petri

In his latest delightful entry, the Austrian Film Museum's Christoph Huber considers a couple of unconventional editing techniques born of necessity. Under consideration here are Jean-Luc Godard's Breathless (1960) and, by way of Raoul Walsh's The Roaring Twenties (1939), Robert Rossen’s All the King’s Men (1949). Also in today's roundup of news and views: Books on Zhang Yimou and Alfred Hitchcock, Marcel Carné’s Les Enfants du paradis at 70, interviews with Jacques Doillon, Peter Strickland, Veronika Lisková, Jan Soldat, Stine Marie Jacobsen, Adam Curtis, Chuck Palahniuk, Desiree Akhavan, Ira Sachs, Ben Stiller and more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | Carné, Doillon, Petri

In his latest delightful entry, the Austrian Film Museum's Christoph Huber considers a couple of unconventional editing techniques born of necessity. Under consideration here are Jean-Luc Godard's Breathless (1960) and, by way of Raoul Walsh's The Roaring Twenties (1939), Robert Rossen’s All the King’s Men (1949). Also in today's roundup of news and views: Books on Zhang Yimou and Alfred Hitchcock, Marcel Carné’s Les Enfants du paradis at 70, interviews with Jacques Doillon, Peter Strickland, Veronika Lisková, Jan Soldat, Stine Marie Jacobsen, Adam Curtis, Chuck Palahniuk, Desiree Akhavan, Ira Sachs, Ben Stiller and more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Jean Grémillon: Realism and Tragedy

  • MUBI
Translators introduction: This article by Mireille Latil Le Dantec, the first of two parts, was originally published in issue 40 of Cinématographe, September 1978. The previous issue of the magazine had included a dossier on "La qualité française" and a book of a never-shot script by Jean Grémillon (Le Printemps de la Liberté or The Spring of Freedom) had recently been published. The time was ripe for a re-evaluation of Grémillon's films and a resuscitation of his undervalued career. As this re-evaluation appears to still be happening nearly 40 years later—Grémillon's films have only recently seen DVD releases and a 35mm retrospective begins this week at Museum of the Moving Image in Queens—this article and its follow-up gives us an important view of a French perspective on Grémillon's work by a very perceptive critic doing the initial heavy-lifting in bringing the proper attention to the filmmaker's work.

Filmmaker maudit?
See full article at MUBI »

It’s Taken Decades, But the Surreal Animated Film The King and the Mockingbird Is Finally Here

  • Vulture
In 1946, the French animator Paul Grimault and poet/screenwriter Jacques Prévert set out to make what they hoped would be the first French animated feature film, based on Hans Christian Andersen’s tale “The Shepherdess and the Chimneysweep.” Prévert was already a legend, having written Le jour se lève and Children of Paradise for director Marcel Carné. Meanwhile, Grimault’s wonderfully iconoclastic fables had won favor both during and after the war. You wouldn’t think two such heavy-duty names would meet much resistance, but within a couple of years, Grimault and Prévert had lost control of the project, and an incomplete, 63-minute version was released without their approval in 1953. That also made its way to U.S. shores in a dubbed version as The Curious Case of Mr. Wonderbird.A couple of decades later, the duo set out to complete the film. Prévert worked on the new script until
See full article at Vulture »
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