7.7/10
8,416
121 user 84 critic

Dead of Night (1945)

Approved | | Fantasy, Horror | 15 October 1945 (UK)
An architect senses impending doom as his half-remembered recurring dream turns into reality. The guests at the country house encourage him to stay as they take turns telling supernatural tales.

Directors:

(as Cavalcanti), | 2 more credits »

Writers:

(original story), (original story) | 5 more credits »
Reviews

Watch Now

From $0.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC

Comic-Con 2017: All Aboard the IMDboat

 | 

July 20 to 23, 2017

Get entertainment news, trailer drops, and photos with IMDb's coverage of 2017 San Diego Comic-Con featuring host and IMDboat captain Kevin Smith, including Saturday's live event.

Browse Our Guide to Comic-Con

1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Roland Culver ...
Mary Merrall ...
...
Joan Cortland
Frederick Valk ...
Dr. Van Straaten
Anthony Baird ...
Hugh Grainger (as Antony Baird)
...
Sally O'Hara
Robert Wyndham ...
Dr. Albury
...
Joyce Grainger
Miles Malleson ...
Hearse Driver
Michael Allan ...
Jimmy Watson
Barbara Leake ...
Mrs O'Hara
Ralph Michael ...
Peter Cortland
Esme Percy ...
Antiques Dealer (as Esmé Percy)
...
George Parratt
Edit

Storyline

Architect Walter Craig, seeking the possibility of some work at a country farmhouse, soon finds himself once again stuck in his recurring nightmare. Dreading the end of the dream that he knows is coming, he must first listen to all the assembled guests' own bizarre tales. Written by Doug Sederberg <vornoff@sonic.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Fantasy | Horror

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

|

Release Date:

15 October 1945 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Prízraky noci  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

During Sally O'Hara's discussion about the party she attended, she says she met Francis Kent, who her friend says was murdered by his sister Constance in the house in 1860. This was an actual murder that took place in 1860, and the culprit's name was actually Constance Kent. She murdered her brother Francis "Saville" Kent at Road Hill House in 1860. Due to a lack of evidence in the case, she was not arrested and put on trial until 1865. The case garnered national attention in the United Kingdom and was partially responsible for the birth of modern detective techniques and the popularity of detective novels like the Sherlock Holmes series. In 2008, author Kate Summerscale released a book entitled "The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher", about the trial and subsequent lives of the Kent family. There was also a 2011 movie based on the book, The Suspicions of Mr Whicher: The Murder at Road Hill House (2011). See more »

Goofs

During the dummy sequence, when sitting and talking with Mr. Kee, the dummy's hand changes position from table to knee. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Eliot Foley: Ah! Walter Craig?
Walter Craig: How do you do? You're Eliot Foley.
Eliot Foley: That's right. So glad you were able to come, let's have your bag.
[takes Craig's bag]
Eliot Foley: We'll put the car away afterwards. You know it struck me after I'd telephoned you, rather a cheek on my part asking a busy architect like yourself to come down and spend the weekend with a set of complete strangers.
Walter Craig: Not a bit.
Eliot Foley: You see we're pretty cramped for space here, we need at least two more bedrooms.
Walter Craig: And with only one living room.
Eliot Foley: Yes, only...
[...]
See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Avengers: Too Many Christmas Trees (1965) See more »

Soundtracks

Light of Foot
(uncredited)
Music by Carl Latann
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
Scared me nearly to death as a kid.
12 March 2001 | by (New Jersey, USA) – See all my reviews

I saw Dead of Night when I was ten years old, and the horror stayed with me through most of my teen years. The mini-story about the antique mirror that showed the reflection of a totally different room than the one the man was in, made me afraid to be alone in a room with a mirror. Even to this day, as a grown man, I am a bit uncomfortable if I am alone at night in a room with a big, old mirror. Most of the mini-stories in this movie stayed with me for years, making me shudder whenever I would think about them. It is interesting, too, that the story of the ventriloquist's dummy that "comes to life," an oft-repeated theme in other movies and TV shows, originated with Dead of Night. I did not see the movie again until decades later. I was not as horrified, seeing it as an adult, but certain scenes still made me shudder. The main, underlying, weird idea of the movie, which becomes plain in the closing scene, leaves you with a spooky feeling and this thought: "could something like this be true of my life too?"


54 of 64 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?