Brief Encounter
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

12 items from 2014


Endeavour series 2 episode 3 review: Sway

16 April 2014 9:32 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Review Gem Wheeler 16 Apr 2014 - 17:29

Morse is on the scent of serial killer in the latest episode of Endeavour. Here's Gem's review of Sway...

This review contains spoilers.

2.3 Sway

A serial killer is stalking Oxford in autumn 1966, and Vivienne Haldane, wife of an eminent physicist at the university, is the latest victim. Morse quickly establishes a pattern to the murders; apart from the fact that all three dead women were found with a particular brand of expensive silk stocking, ‘Le Minou Noir’, around their necks, each was married, but has had her wedding ring removed by the killer. Pathologist Dr DeBryn finds that Mrs Haldane had had intercourse not long before her death, but it was certainly not with husband Rufus (Michael Thomas), from whom she had long been estranged. The hunt is on for a murderer with a type: married women who he seduces and kills, for reasons »

- louisamellor

Permalink | Report a problem


"Something, Anything": A Conversation with Paul Harrill

14 April 2014 8:35 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Paul Harrill’s Something, Anything, which co-premiered recently at the Wisconsin Film Festival and the Sarasota Film Festival, is a portrait of a young woman in crisis. Peggy [Ashley Shelton] has already achieved her “stereotypically Southern” (as she’s described in the press kit) ambitions: a successful career in realty, a husband, a house in the suburbs, and a baby on the way. In the opening moments of the film, however, she’s forced to confront her dissatisfaction with it all. A family tragedy sends Peggy on a sojourn that leads her to the Abbey of Gethsemani in Kentucky and, eventually, to a simpler life in a small apartment overlooking the Tennessee River.

Harrill first gained recognition in 2001 when his short film, Gina, An Actress, Age 29, won the top prize at Sundance and enjoyed an impressive run of screenings at international festivals. Starring Amy Hubbard and Frankie Faison (Burrell from The Wire »

- Darren Hughes

Permalink | Report a problem


The Lunchbox review - 'a quiet storm of banked emotions'

12 April 2014 4:05 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Bollywood romance blossoms when the wrong lunch lands on the desk of a Mumbai office drone

Already a huge success in its native India, Ritesh Batra's Mumbai-set romance arranges a tender marriage of Brief Encounter with Ernst Lubitsch's The Shop Around the Corner. Bollywood star Irrfan Khan plays Saajan, an ageing office drone who finds the wrong lunchbox delivered to his desk and stumbles into a chaste relationship with Nimrat Kaur's unhappy housewife. Before long, this pair will learn the value of crossed wires and missed connections and how (in the words of one colleague) "the wrong train can get you to the right station". Who cares if the conceit feels a shade schematic? The Lunchbox is perfectly handled and beautifully acted; a quiet storm of banked emotions. I loved the bittersweet scenes of Saajan clinging to the handrails of the crowded commuter carriage or smoking on »

- Xan Brooks

Permalink | Report a problem


Just a Sigh | Review

19 March 2014 10:30 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Brief Encounter: Bonnell’s Latest a Breezy, Gallic Affair

With his fifth feature, Just a Sigh, (a butchered translation from what really should be The Time of Adventure), director Jerome Bonnell revisits themes he seems inspired by, as he reunites with the lovely Emmanuelle Devos for a tale that sounds like a distant cousin to his 2002 debut, Le Chignon d’Olga. While there’s certainly a whiff of Lean’s Brief Encounter that might glance through your mind like a musty phantom, this is a mostly lighthearted carefree romp through a day in the life of a woman who does something that most people seem to fantasize about—making love to a proper stranger.

Alix Aubane (Devos), a perpetually broke actress in the midst of performing Ibsen’s “The Lady and the Sea,” absconds to Paris for a film audition. Forgetting her cell phone charger, she leaves fraught messages »

- Nicholas Bell

Permalink | Report a problem


In Just a Sigh, a Day-Long European Liaison Held Up By Its Stars

18 March 2014 9:00 PM, PDT | Village Voice | See recent Village Voice news »

Just a Sigh bears an evocative English title, and one that proves more appropriate than the original French — Le temps de l'aventure, or The Time of Adventure.

Perhaps the sigh suggests contentment, as in a reflex of post-coital release, or perhaps it suggests resignation, like a gesture of exasperated defeat. Alix (Emmanuelle Devos) does both. Her time of adventure, such as it is, begins and ends with a spontaneous afternoon tryst, an opportunity she seizes after eyeing a handsome Irishman (Gabriel Byrne) on a Paris-bound train.

This sort of fleeting European rendezvous belongs to a rich cinematic tradition reaching from Brief Encounter to Before Sunrise. Just a Sigh's day-long liaison sustains interest largely for the a »

Permalink | Report a problem


How we made Wallace and Gromit

3 March 2014 4:05 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Gromit was a cat, Wallace had a moustache, and their first adventure was meant to be like Star Wars – but with cheese. Nick Park and Peter Lord on creating a British classic

Nick Park, creator

As soon as I started filming A Grand Day Out, the first Wallace and Gromit animation, I realised I was making a film about my dad. He loved tinkering about in the shed. He didn't look like Wallace, but somehow I could see him in his eyes – although my dad's eyes didn't meet in the middle, of course.

It was 1982 and, back then, Wallace had no eyebrows, hardly any cheeks and a moustache. And Gromit was embarrassing: he had a nose like a banana, or a cross between a banana and a pear. When Peter Sallis, who voices Wallace, said "No cheeeese, Gromit" for the first time, I realised how wide and toothy I was »

- Kate Abbott

Permalink | Report a problem


How we made Wallace and Gromit

3 March 2014 4:05 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Gromit was a cat, Wallace had a moustache, and their first adventure was meant to be like Star Wars – but with cheese. Nick Park and Peter Lord on creating a British classic

Nick Park, creator

As soon as I started filming A Grand Day Out, the first Wallace and Gromit animation, I realised I was making a film about my dad. He loved tinkering about in the shed. He didn't look like Wallace, but somehow I could see him in his eyes – although my dad's eyes didn't meet in the middle, of course.

It was 1982 and, back then, Wallace had no eyebrows, hardly any cheeks and a moustache. And Gromit was embarrassing: he had a nose like a banana, or a cross between a banana and a pear. When Peter Sallis, who voices Wallace, said "No cheeeese, Gromit" for the first time, I realised how wide and toothy I was »

- Kate Abbott

Permalink | Report a problem


At Middleton | Review

31 January 2014 7:00 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

One Fine Day: Rodgers’ Debut Features Strong Script, Enjoyable Performances

In a saturated market of mediocrity, a slew of sub-par independent romantic dramedies often force some more attention worthy titles to get lost in the mix, which would be an unfortunate fate for Adam Rodgers’ directorial debut, At Middleton, which has been bouncing around on the festival circuit since a premiere at the Seattle Film Festival last year. While its aim isn’t to be extraordinary or overly ambitious in its intentions, it’s a confidently made, well written and handsomely performed scenario that gets a surprising amount of mileage from overly familiar dramatic tensions.

As the inevitability of their freshmen year at college looms near, a throng of people gather at the bucolic campus of Middleton, a prestigious Ivy League school. The severely anal retentive Audrey (Tessa Farmiga) has been dead set on the school, salivating at the »

- Nicholas Bell

Permalink | Report a problem


Opera's Brokeback Mountain - it makes perfect sense

28 January 2014 7:30 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Composers have always mined familiar stories for their texts, although Charles Wuorinen, whose Brokeback Mountain premieres tonight in Madrid, has gone back to the source rather than the screen version of this timeless story

Charles Wuorinen's opera on Annie Proulx's Brokeback Mountain is anything but an adaptation of the movie. For a start, the opera features Proulx's own libretto, whereas the author did not write the screenplay for the Oscar-winning movie. As Proulx told me for this week's Music Matters, creating her own opera libretto from her 1997 story was about compressing the already heightened, concise world of the short story still further into the distilled essentials that the characters will sing on stage at the world premiere at the Teatro Real in Madrid tonight. Wuorinen says that he wanted to do something that the film didn't: instead of the beautifying effects of the cinematography on the mountainous landscape of the North American West, »

- Tom Service

Permalink | Report a problem


The Railway Man – review | Mark Kermode

11 January 2014 5:20 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Eric Lomax's story of life and death on the Burma railway gets another retelling, although it does get a little muddled

The story of Eric Lomax, a signals engineer who was forced to work on the infamous Thai-Burmese "Death Railway" after being taken prisoner by the Japanese during the second world war, has been told several times before, in print and on screen. We have Lomax's source memoir (upon which this film is based) and Mike Finlason's documentary Enemy, My Friend?, alongside an episode of the long-running Everyman TV show Prisoners in Time that cast John Hurt as the former soldier eaten away by nightmares of torture. Even Lomax's wartime tormentor Takashi Nagase has told his side of the story in the book Crosses and Tigers.

This latest retelling, from a screenplay by Frank Cottrell Boyce and Andy Paterson, wrestles with themes of suffering and redemption as it criss-crosses »

- Mark Kermode

Permalink | Report a problem


The 7.39 (1 of 2): Episode Review

8 January 2014 9:57 AM, PST | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

BBC

Is a railway romance a good platform for a lasting relationship?

David Morrissey and Sheridan Smith book a one-way train to Excitementville, bypassing Responsibiltyford and Mundaneton in the BBC’s new two-part drama written by David Nicholls. But is the story merely an unambitious cliché of a Brief Encounter replacement service?

Most disappointing of any aspect inside the programme was the decision of the BBC programmers not to reschedule the entire evening to broadcast the 7.39 at its misleading self-appointed time and choose the ironically timely 9pm slot instead. For one day or two, surely the Ten O’clock News could have been delayed due to leaves on the line or some sort of signal failure directed at Huw Edwards.

David Nicholls, author of best-seller One Day, choo choo chooses one train as his subject for this mini-series. The service in question is the daily commute of the 7.39 to Waterloo. »

- George Meixner

Permalink | Report a problem


Review: The Railway Man

6 January 2014 2:22 AM, PST | Shadowlocked | See recent Shadowlocked news »

The subject of World War Two has been cinematically exhausted, leaving very few original stories to tell. Yet time and again, world war films prove that they can attract audiences (War Horse), please critics (The Pianist) and – in some cases – revisit the subject in order to create something new.

The Railway Man ticks some of those boxes, but ultimately comes up short on most occasions. The film, however, has its heart in the right place and like its main character – the tortured war vet Eric Lomax – it is redeemed through its decision to champion reconciliation and dialogue over revenge and retribution.

An Anglo-Australian co-production, The Railway Man is an adaptation of Eric Lomax’s memoir of the same name. It follows the parallel stories of both a young and middle-aged Lomax. In the present, Lomax (played by Colin Firth) is a mild-mannered English gentleman with an avid interest in trains. »

Permalink | Report a problem


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

12 items from 2014


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners