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The Woman in the Window
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The Woman in the Window More at IMDbPro »

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1 out of 2 people found the following review useful:

A nightmare or a dream

7/10
Author: esteban1747 from Spain
18 May 2003

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

A professor is dreaming a relationship with a beautiful woman painted in a big portrait. Suddenly he met her and the story starts, nothing good, all troubles and even crimes, he becomes tired of the situation, he does not want even to see her anymore, suddenly somebody wakes him up, so he was sleeping and having a nightmare or a dream. Good for him, who goes back home happy that everything never happened in his life. A very original film with good acting of Edward G. Robinson as usual.

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1 out of 2 people found the following review useful:

so dark

Author: w. t. benda from austin, texas
5 October 2002

No one could have been prepared for the woman Joan Bennett becomes in this film, seeing all her movies for the fifteen years before this one was made would have accomplished for a faithful viewer absolutely nothing. This woman has in effect murdered that early Joan Bennett, and in order to demonstrate her strength -- as her serpentine motivation reveals itself beneath circumstances -- is going to destroy all the tough guys that Edward G. Robinson ever played. The result, being somewhat ambiguous, provoked director Fritz Lang to reprise the entire relationship the following year in "Scarlet Street," featuring the same Bennett, Robinson and Dan Duryea. Only the names were changed, to protect the weak and evil. But one watching "Woman in the Window" experiences the texture of descent, whereas "Scarlet Street" begins and ends prone on the sidewalk.

W. T. Benda Austin, Texas

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1 out of 2 people found the following review useful:

great entertainment

7/10
Author: Robert D. Ruplenas
2 July 2002

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

POSSIBLE SPOILER? Caught this extremely entertaining flick on TCM last night and was bowled over by its masterful manipulation of suspense to keep you on the edge of your seat. Wonderful cast, with Robinson, Duryea, and Massey, but I don't think much of Joan Bennett's acting abilities. It's Lang's masterful direction of a fine script that keeps the tension alive. It's true that the astonishingly cop-out ending flips the mood from tragedy to light-hearted comedy a bit too suddenly, but it doesn't detract from overall enjoyment. Good flick.

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1 out of 2 people found the following review useful:

One of the best films that I have seen of the period with a superb performance by EG.

Author: fan_no2 from Australia
15 January 2002

I liked this film a lot and for anyone that is a fan of Double Indemnity it is a must see. The casting and performances were superb and the film is imbued with the atmosphere of the period. It was good to see the tough little guy whom I admire so much sweating profusely.

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1 out of 2 people found the following review useful:

Man tries to cover up his crime

8/10
Author: helpless_dancer from Broken Bow, Oklahoma
30 July 1999

Very good film about a middle aged professor who becomes enmeshed in a crime of passion. He goes through an elaborate ordeal attempting to hide his deed. Meanwhile,his partner in crime is having problems with a clever thug who has figured out the basics of the offense. The professor becomes more and more distraught as his plans to escape the law go totally awry leading him to a final desperate act. The ending to this movie would be trite today, but played out well in this one.

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2 out of 4 people found the following review useful:

Easy to confuse with "Scarlet Street"...same cast, same director...

7/10
Author: Neil Doyle from U.S.A.
19 September 2006

EDWARD G. ROBINSON was one of my favorite actors from the film noir period of the '40s and he had one of his very best roles here as the man who falls in love with a portrait of JOAN BENNETT--and she becomes the woman of his dreams.

A tight, suspenseful plot has him caught in a struggle with her jealous ex-boyfriend whom he kills in self-defense. He and Bennett decide to hide the crime, but she is soon being blackmailed by DAN DURYEA, a plot similarity to Fritz Lang's SCARLET STREET wherein Duryea was also cast as a slimy blackmailer.

The plot thickens when RAYMOND MASSEY, a detective friend of Robinson, starts to discuss the case with the man who committed the crime and has successfully hidden the body. He starts getting suspicious when Robinson lets information slip out that only the murderer could know.

The suspense builds as a cat and mouse game is played--until the rather unsettling ending which had a lot of people up in arms over the sly deception--the kind that would have pleased Alfred Hitchcock.

Well worth seeing, beautifully acted by a fine cast--and definitely one of Fritz Lang's best films.

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0 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Then Dorothy says, "YOU were there, and you, and you--and YOU, too . . . "

9/10
Author: Edgar Allan Pooh from The Gutters of Baltimore
3 March 2015

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

. . . so there might have been "no place like home" for little Dottie Gale of Kansas, but there was no place like the club as far as psych prof "Dick Wanley" was concerned as MGM recycled a denouement from its back catalog to close THE WOMAN IN THE WINDOW. Just five years after Judy Garland clicked her ruby red slippers so she could follow Frank Morgan home in the WIZARD OF OZ, Edward G. Robinson fingers his magic monogrammed pencil reclining in his club's Lazy-Boy to accomplish a similar feat. Just as an ice pack was enough to turn the Scarecrow, Tin Man, and Cowardly Lion back into Hickory, Zeke, and Hunk, a little rub of the led turns Robinson's business tycoon murder victim into his club's hatcheck guy, with his slick blackmailer morphing into the club's harmless doorman. My biggest disappointment is that MGM chose not to apply this winning formula to GONE WITH THE WIND. That would have been a much better film if it had ended with Vivian Leigh being woken up from her afternoon beauty rest at Antebellum Tara by all her beaus rushing in, shouting "Peace at last--Jeff Davis has freed the slaves!" Leslie Howard would turn out to be her family priest, and Clark Gable would be unmasked as the local tax collector.

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0 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Nice Thriller with Excellent Performances

Author: Michael_Elliott from Louisville, KY
19 November 2010

Woman in the Window, The (1944)

*** 1/2 (out of 4)

Tense thriller from director Lang has family man Professor Richard Wanley (Edward G. Robinson) having a brief night out with a woman (Joan Bennett) who he had earlier seen a portrait of in a window. Soon a man she had been with in the past shows up in the room and the professor ends up killing him to save his own life. Not wanting to go to the police, the two decide to dump the man's body but it's soon discovered and the two begin to fear that the other is going to go to the police. This is yet another very impressive film from Lang who deserves a lot of the credit but so does the screenplay and performances. I think the film starts off a tad bit slow but once the murder actually takes place things start to heat up and by the time the ending comes your finger nails will have been bitten all the way down. What impressed me the most was Lang's decision to film the majority of the early part of the film in long shots. At first I thought it was rather strange that he'd film it this way but as we lead up to the murder and the scenes after it it becomes obvious that shooting in these long shots actually works because it really makes you feel as if you're a third character who eventually shows up to blackmail them. I thought this long shots were perfectly used by Lang because it really makes the viewer feel distant from what's going on but at the same time you're witnessing something you're not suppose to be seeing just as the characters themselves hope they're not being seen. Throughout the rest of the film we get more medium and close ups as the net around Robinson and Bennett begins to grow tighter. Robinson made a career out of playing tough guys but he was such a great actor that he could play someone much smaller just like this character. I thought he did a wonderful job especially in the scenes where he's about to crack from the pressure. Bennett made for a terrific femme fatale because she was so seduction but also very good in the more quiet moments where she too begins to fear the police. The supporting cast features strong performances from Edmund Breon, Dan Duryea and Raymond Massey. While this is an extremely good movie I still found some flaws including some of Robinson's actions after the police get involved. I thought there were a few too many clues that he throws out because of some dumb words he says or him pretty much leading the police to suspect him. I thought the clues were just way too obvious and I thought it went against his character to be this stupid. Then, of course, there's the rather controversial ending. I won't ruin it for people but I didn't like it. It's not downright horrible like many would have you believe but it just didn't work.

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0 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Superb psycho-melodrama.

8/10
Author: Michael O'Keefe from Muskogee OK
18 January 2010

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Fritz Lang directs this fulfilling film noir about a straight-laced college psychology professor entering into a surprising dalliance while his family is away. Richard Manley(Edward G. Robinson)sees the portrait of a beautiful woman, Alice(Joan Bennett), and lands in a world of hurt, when he meets the model and she invites him up to her apartment for a drink. It becomes more than one drink; there seems to be thoughts of romance, but Alice's jealous boyfriend(Arthur Loft) arrives and goes into a rage assaulting the couple. In self defense the professor puts a pair of scissors in the back of his attacker. Now there is the problem of disposing of the body. It gets a bit dicey, because Manley's best friend,(Raymond Massey), happens to be the D.A. working the murder case. And for more suspense, a blackmailer(Dan Duryea)slinks into the mix.

Very crisp black & white with just the right atmosphere, off and on rain showers. The story line of forbidden and doomed love is what movies are made of. Robinson is in top form and Bennett is absolutely beautiful. I'm a sucker for classic movies like this.

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0 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

One of the great film noirs

9/10
Author: calvinnme from United States
14 November 2009

The war years saw Hollywood's leading men unavailable - Clark Gable, James Stewart, and many others, were otherwise occupied. At this point, some of the better character actors stepped up to starring roles they might not otherwise have gotten. The darkness of the war years also did a bit to loosen the grip of the production code by allowing darker plots than would otherwise pass inspection, but the evildoers still had to be punished in the end. This began the trend of "film noir" - related to their predecessors, the precodes, by examining the seedy side of life, but emphasizing the duality of man's nature rather than the sexual angles and the evolving roles of women and men in society as the films of the early 30's tended to do.

"The Woman in the Window" is a great film noir starring the great Edward G. Robinson as a mild mannered New York City professor. He packs his wife and kids off to the country at the beginning of the summer as was the custom back before the days of air conditioning, and he begins his three month bachelorhood by joining two friends at his private club, one of which is D.A. Frank Lalor (Raymond Massey). Before entering his club, though, he appreciates a painting of a beautiful woman, "the woman in the window". His two friends see him staring, kid him about it, and they proceed to have a conversation in which the D.A. talks about how many cases he sees in which a small wrong step by an ordinarily law-abiding citizen leads to major crime.

The rest of the film is basically a demonstration of what the D.A. spoke about when you mix Robinson's mild professor with the actual flirtatious woman in the window (Joan Bennett), add a case of homicide in self-defense under seemingly scandalous circumstances where there is no way to prove self-defense, and finally introduce a seedy blackmailing P.I. (Dan Duryea) into the mix. The film has many twists and turns and you can feel your guts wrenching along with Robinson's as he watches the police come closer and closer to his door with every update he gets from his friend the D.A. who thinks he is just sharing an interesting case with a professor of criminology.

The end then takes a sharp turn and totally surprises you.

This film was so good that Fritz Lang followed it up the following year with an even better effort - Scarlet Street - with Robinson, Duryea, and Bennett playing similar parts as they did in this film. There's even a painting as a central plot point in this second film as well.

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