7.2/10
162
5 user 1 critic

With the Marines at Tarawa (1944)

Documentary short film depicting the harrowing battle between the U.S. Marines and the Japanese for control of the Pacific island of Tarawa.

Directors:

(uncredited), (uncredited)
Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

Won 1 Oscar. Another 1 win. See more awards »
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Cast

Credited cast:
Alexander Bonnyman Jr. ...
Himself - USMC, leads assault on shelter top (unconfirmed)
John Borich ...
Himself - USMC, with Niehoff, shoots flame at shelter top
Merritt A. Edson ...
Himself - USMC, salutes flag (unconfirmed)
H.W. Hill ...
Himself - USN (as Adm. Harry Hill)
Harry Niehoff ...
Himself - USMC, with Borich, lobs bomb on shelter top
David M. Shoup ...
Himself - USMC, confers with his staff (unconfirmed)
Holland M. Smith ...
Himself - USMC (as Gen. Holland Smith)
Julian C. Smith ...
Himself - USMC (as Gen. Julian Smith)
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Storyline

Documentary short film depicting the harrowing battle between the U.S. Marines and the Japanese for control of the Pacific island of Tarawa.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary | Short | War

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

2 March 1944 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

La guerre du Pacifique - With the marines at Tarawa  »

Filming Locations:


Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Sepiatone)| (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The destroyer shown near the beginning of the film delivering orders to the command ship is the U.S.S. Frazier (DD-607). During the battle of Tarawa it provided pre-invasion bombardment and fire support to the Marines ashore. Commissioned in 1942, the ship earned 12 battle stars in WWII. She was decommissioned in 1946 and sold for scrap in 1972. See more »

Connections

Featured in WWII in HD: Bloody Resolve (2009) See more »

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User Reviews

 
graphic war footage and important propaganda
15 January 2016 | by See all my reviews

Director Louis Hayward delivers an important Oscar-winning documentary short about the Battle of Tarawa in the South Pacific. America suffered almost 1700 dead which shocked the country. The movie has colored war footage filmed by combat reporters right in the thick of the fight. It proved to be too graphic to exhibit until President Roosevelt approved it himself. It brings war documentary to a new level of realism. As propaganda, this is a very risky move by Roosevelt. The bloody fight could have sapped the resolve of the American people. Instead, the people rose to the occasion and come to understand the difficult fight yet to come.


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