7.3/10
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This Happy Breed (1944)

Not Rated | | Comedy, Drama | 12 April 1947 (USA)
Noel Coward's attempt to show how the ordinary people lived between the wars. Just after WWI the Gibbons family moves to a nice house in the suburbs. An ordinary sort of life is led by the ... See full summary »

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Writers:

(adapted for the screen by), (adapted for the screen by) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
Amy Veness ...
Mrs. Flint
Alison Leggatt ...
Aunt Sylvia
...
...
Billy Mitchell
Kay Walsh ...
Queenie
...
...
Reg Gibbons
Guy Verney ...
Sam Leadbitter
Betty Fleetwood ...
Phyllis Blake
...
Edie
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Storyline

Noel Coward's attempt to show how the ordinary people lived between the wars. Just after WWI the Gibbons family moves to a nice house in the suburbs. An ordinary sort of life is led by the family through the years with average number of triumphs and disasters until the outbreak of WWII. Written by Steve Crook <steve@brainstorm.co.uk>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

12 April 1947 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Heureux mortels  »

Box Office

Budget:

£200,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The swelling orchestral fanfare which plays over the film's final shots is based around the main theme of the then-popular patriotic song London Pride - a song written and most notably recorded by Noël Coward, the film's producer and author of the play upon which the film is based. See more »

Goofs

As Ethel and Queenie move the box of dishes into the kitchen, the shadow of a boom microphone is clearly visible in the kitchen door frame. See more »

Quotes

Vi: You can't expect everyone else in the world to think like you do
See more »

Crazy Credits

Opening credits prologue: This is the story of a London family from 1919 to 1939. See more »

Connections

References The Broadway Melody (1929) See more »

Soundtracks

A Life on the Ocean Wave
(uncredited)
Lyrics by Epes Sargent
Music by Henry Russell
Heard during the Victory Parade
See more »

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User Reviews

Painted in broad strokes to the detriment of emotional involvement but the focus on the lead two (characters & actors) provide enough high spots to be worth watching
16 November 2004 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

When Frank Gibbons returns from the killing fields of World War I, he rejoins his wife Ethel and together they move with their family into a new house in the suburbs of London. The year is 1919 and everything looks rosy for the future. The future holds joy in the shape of children, marriages and friends however it also holds disappointment with, erm, children, marriages, strikes, death and, tragically, more war. Over the following decades we trace the trials and fortunes of the Gibbons family against the backdrop of a changing Britain.

One could argue that Noel Coward may not have been the best placed to write about the live of an ordinary family but he did it reasonably well in his play from what I am told. In this version though the material is stretched to the point of being simplistic as it attempts to cover far too much ground and emotion to be able to fit it into a running time of just over an hour and a half. The story is interesting enough and the amount going on means it is never really dull but the problem is that we never really get deep enough into the stories to be emotionally sold on any thread or character. It jumps so much that it cannot often allow time for subtle half-measures in the plotting and instead has to make sure that its points are heavy and obvious – again taking away from how recognisable the whole affair is. This is not to say that it doesn't have good points, but they come due to consistency in the telling and therefore rely heavily on Frank and Ethel to be core to the telling.

This also means that the film pretty much belongs to Newton and Johnson in the acting stakes. Together they share plenty of quiet moments that show an unspoken hurt or emotion that is more subtle that the events portrayed; they also have a natural chemistry that made me believe that they were a couple and had been for years. The support cast are OK but mostly they are involved in the more extreme plot threads and are forced to ditch patience and subtlety as a result – but then people like Mills, Holloway, Walsh, Leggat et al are still interesting enough to be worth watching and none of them give anything like a bad performance, but they pale beside the lead pair.

Overall this is a good film but it is painted in broad strokes across decades and this reduces the emotional impact and involvement that it has. There are moments of course and the story is interesting enough even with its flaws but the film relies heavily on the lead pair. Narrative wise the film is never better than when it is tightly focused on the hearts of Frank and Ethel and acting wise it is dominated by the solid chemistry between Newton and Johnson.


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