IMDb > The Thin Man Goes Home (1945)
The Thin Man Goes Home
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The Thin Man Goes Home (1945) More at IMDbPro »

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The Thin Man Goes Home -- Nick and Nora go on holiday, and end up involved in a murder.

Overview

User Rating:
7.4/10   2,921 votes »
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Up 37% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Robert Riskin (screenplay) and
Dwight Taylor (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Thin Man Goes Home on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
January 1945 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
Nick and Nora go on holiday, and end up involved in a murder. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
NewsDesk:
Johnny Depp solves Thin Man remake
 (From The Guardian - Film News. 10 May 2011, 4:42 AM, PDT)

User Reviews:
The Great American Dream See more (36 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

William Powell ... Nick Charles

Myrna Loy ... Nora Charles
Lucile Watson ... Mrs. Marta Charles

Gloria DeHaven ... Laura Belle Ronson (as Gloria De Haven)
Anne Revere ... Crazy Mary
Helen Vinson ... Helena Draque

Harry Davenport ... Dr. Bertram Charles

Leon Ames ... Edgar Draque

Donald Meek ... Willie Crump
Edward Brophy ... Brogan
Lloyd Corrigan ... Dr. Bruce Clayworth
Anita Sharp-Bolster ... Hilda (as Anita Bolster)
Ralph Brooke ... Peter Berton
Donald MacBride ... Police Chief MacGregor
Morris Ankrum ... Willoughby Peavy
Nora Cecil ... Miss Peavy
Minor Watson ... Sam Ronson
Irving Bacon ... Tom
Virginia Sale ... Tom's Wife

Asta ... Asta
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Jean Acker ... Tart (uncredited)
Fred Aldrich ... Train Passenger (uncredited)

Oliver Blake ... Reporter (uncredited)
Dick Botiller ... Big Man's Companion (uncredited)
Lucile Browne ... Skating Woman (uncredited)
Wally Cassell ... Bill Burns (uncredited)
Clancy Cooper ... Butcher in Montage (uncredited)
Joseph Crehan ... Clancy, Policeman at Railroad Station (uncredited)
Tom Dillon ... Police Officer (uncredited)
Tom Dugan ... Studs Lonnegan (uncredited)
Helen Eby-Rock ... Tart (uncredited)
Sarah Edwards ... Passenger on Train asking 'Why Should I?' (uncredited)
Rex Evans ... Fat Man in Train Passageway (uncredited)
Tom Fadden ... Train Passenger in Passageway (uncredited)
Sam Flint ... Hotel Clerk (uncredited)
Dorothy Ford ... Tall Girl with Dog (uncredited)
Edward Gargan ... Mickey Finnegan (uncredited)
Connie Gilchrist ... Woman on Train with Baby (uncredited)
Sol Gorss ... Bartender in Pool Room (uncredited)
Jane Green ... Miss Harvey - Clayworth's Housekeeper (uncredited)
Joseph J. Greene ... Train Passenger (uncredited)
Charles Halton ... R.T. Tatum (uncredited)
Mickey Harris ... Contortionist (uncredited)
Harry Hayden ... Train Conductor (uncredited)
Robert Homans ... Railroad Clerk (uncredited)
Bill Hunter ... Police Officer (uncredited)
Virginia Hunter ... Girl at Charity Dance (uncredited)
Frank Jaquet ... Train Passenger with Glasses Askew (uncredited)

Paul Langton ... Tom Clayworth (uncredited)
Mitchell Lewis ... Third Man Outside Barber Shop (uncredited)
Bert May ... Sailor (uncredited)

Mike Mazurki ... First Man Outside Barber Shop (uncredited)
Etta McDaniel ... Ronson's Maid (uncredited)

Catherine McLeod ... Daughter in Montage (uncredited)
Howard M. Mitchell ... Train Passenger (uncredited)

Clarence Muse ... Porter on Train (uncredited)
William H. O'Brien ... Train Passenger (uncredited)
Robert Emmett O'Connor ... Baggage Attendant on Train (uncredited)
Garry Owen ... Pool Player (uncredited)
Jack Perry ... Man in Pool Hall Brawl (uncredited)
Bill Smith ... Skating Man (uncredited)

Ray Teal ... Second Man Outside Barber Shop (uncredited)

John Wengraf ... Big Man (uncredited)
Marjorie Wood ... Mother in Montage (uncredited)
Joe Yule ... Barber (uncredited)
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Directed by
Richard Thorpe 
 
Writing credits
Robert Riskin (screenplay) and
Dwight Taylor (screenplay)

Robert Riskin (original story) and
Harry Kurnitz (original story)

Dashiell Hammett (characters)

Produced by
Everett Riskin .... producer
 
Original Music by
David Snell 
Lennie Hayton (uncredited)
Bronislau Kaper (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Karl Freund 
Joseph Ruttenberg (uncredited)
 
Film Editing by
Ralph E. Winters 
 
Art Direction by
Edward C. Carfagno  (as Edward Carfagno)
Cedric Gibbons 
 
Set Decoration by
Edwin B. Willis 
 
Production Management
Edward Woehler .... production manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Al Jennings .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Mildred Griffiths .... associate set decorator
Frank Wesselhoff .... painter (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Douglas Shearer .... recording director
James Burbridge .... unit sound mixer (uncredited)
Standish J. Lambert .... sound effects mixer (uncredited)
Standish J. Lambert .... sound re-recordist (uncredited)
Frank McKenzie .... sound effects mixer (uncredited)
Frank McKenzie .... sound re-recordist (uncredited)
Robert Shirley .... sound effects mixer (uncredited)
Robert Shirley .... sound re-recordist (uncredited)
Newell Sparks .... sound effects mixer (uncredited)
Newell Sparks .... sound re-recordist (uncredited)
William Steinkamp .... sound effects mixer (uncredited)
William Steinkamp .... sound re-recordist (uncredited)
Michael Steinore .... sound effects mixer (uncredited)
Michael Steinore .... sound re-recordist (uncredited)
John A. Williams .... sound effects mixer (uncredited)
John A. Williams .... sound re-recordist (uncredited)
 
Visual Effects by
A. Arnold Gillespie .... transparency projection shots (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Harkness Smith .... second camera operator (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Irene .... costume supervisor
Marion Herwood Keyes .... associate costume supervisor (as Marion Herwood)
Eugene Joseff .... costume jeweller (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Edward Baravalle .... music mixer (uncredited)
Henry Eicheim .... music technical advisor (uncredited)
Wally Heglin .... orchestrator (uncredited)
M.J. McLaughlin .... music mixer (uncredited)
William Saracino .... music mixer (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Jeanette Bates .... dance director (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
100 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Certification:
Finland:S | UK:A (original rating) | UK:PG (re-rating) (2005) | USA:Not Rated | USA:Approved (PCA #10301)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Norman Taurog directed the additional scenes filmed in August and September, 1944, because Richard Thorpe had begun work on his next film Thrill of a Romance (1945).See more »
Goofs:
Audio/visual unsynchronized: When Peter Berton is standing in the doorway talking to Nick, when he speaks, the words come out, "You see, there's something I've gotta get off my mind." But the mouth movements indicate he said, "There's something I've gotta get off my chest."See more »
Quotes:
Nicholas 'Nick' Charles:A couple of weeks on this cider and I'll be a new man.
Nora Charles:I sort of like the old one.
Nicholas 'Nick' Charles:Why, darling, that's the nicest thing you've said to me since the time I got my head caught in that cuspidor at the Waldorf.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Deep In The Heart Of TexasSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
17 out of 21 people found the following review useful.
The Great American Dream, 8 January 2002
Author: JamesP. Scribner (jimscribner@webtv.net) from Fort Hood, Texas

All the Thin Man films are great to watch, but this is one with which I find a bit easier to identify. Riskin, the writer of this film and long time scriptwriter for Frank Capra, was also the guy who wrote "It Happened One Night" and "Meet John Doe". This New York City born writer's attraction to average Joe small town values over Cosmopolitan glitz and decadence obvious in those two films is plain to see here. This is probably the image a lot of successful urbanites had about moving to the suburbs after WW2.

This is sort of an odd bird among Thin Man films in a couple of ways. First of all, Nick is astonishingly sober for a change. Don't look for any of those scenes of Nick and Nora trying to drink each other the table at some New York nightclub in this one. In fact, the nightclubs and high rises are totally gone as Nick takes Nora the glamorous New York socialite back for a visit to Nick's hometown, which bears a fairly strong likeness to Andy Hardy's. Nick's father is a retired M.D. not unlike the ones in the Norman Rockwell paintings. He wanted Nick to follow in his footsteps as a small town doctor instead of becoming a big city policeman and this is the first time the two of them have gotten together in years. This father-son reconciliation is the explanation for Nick's sudden uncharacteristic attraction to a sober, healthy lifestyle.

Nick's father is actually fairly proud of Nick and keeps a scrapbook about all his adventures. The whole town knows about Nick Charles the famous Detective. I sort of see invisible images of G.I.s returning home from WW2 in a lot of this movie. Nick's celebrity as a tough, smart local boy who went off to bring gun toting gangsters to justice in the big city of aristocratic sophisticates and Broadway nights is not very far removed from how most Americans probably saw the guys who went off to liberate Paris and Europe in WW2. Nora fits into that picture as a sort of "Mrs. Miniver" figure of what American's admired about European sophication brought back home to meet the folks.

The homecoming hero vision of Nick peacefully turning into a happy coach potato in a post war suburbia however is not what we want to see. What everybody loves about the Thin Man films is their contrary to Hollywood stereotype revelation that life after marriage can actually be exciting. Nora decides to get Nick off the coach with an "I Love Lucy" sort of plot twist that spreads a rumor around town that Nick is secretly working on a detective case. The result of course is that all the various local characters with small town secrets to hide think he's after them and all the mystery murders and skeletons start coming out of the closet like we've all been waiting to see. Nick and Nora are such a fun couple, aren't they?

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Message Boards

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Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Did they really pack trains like that, back then? RodJF
The part they left out Balok-2
Am I the only one??? brianwiik
Why was Crazy Mary murdered? chongajuly
What is Brogan?!? StratasFan
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