Meet Me in St. Louis
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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005

8 items from 2016


Tiff 2016. Correspondences #5

13 September 2016 10:51 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Salt and FireDear Danny,Funny you mention genre, as A Quiet Passion would seem to belong to my least favorite one: the biopic. Or not really, for directors create their own genres, great ones do, and Terence Davies is among the greatest now at work. His Emily Dickinson, splendidly embodied by Cynthia Nixon, is no genteel figurine reciting favorite verses but a sharp and unyielding intelligence twisting in a severe body and a severe era. Right from the start, refusing to move to one side or another when her seminary is divided according to faith, she will not give an inch. (“You are alone in your rebellion,” snaps the headmistress, crucifix looming in the background.) At her Massachusetts family home, words—not just the budding poetess’ stanzas, but bon mots, barbs, any curlicues of witty verbiage—are cherished cracks in staid domesticity, like the songs in Meet Me in St. Louis. »

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NYC Weekend Watch: Double Bills, ‘Inherent Vice’ on 70mm, Kurosawa, Minnelli & More

1 September 2016 7:30 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film Forum

Cinema’s holy trinity — Ed Wood (technically Burton-Wood), Malick, and Chaplin — have two-for-one double-billings this weekend.

Howards End continues its run.

Museum of the Moving Image

“See It Big! The 70mm Show” concludes with Kenneth Branagh‘s Hamlet and Inherent Vice.

If you missed it in theaters, see the great Kaili Blues when »

- Nick Newman

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Judy by the Numbers: "On The Atchison Topeka And The Santa Fe"

1 June 2016 5:00 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Anne Marie is tracking Judy Garland's career through musical numbers...

Though we last left Judy Garland in 1944 crooning from a trolley and cementing a (troubled) place in Hollywood history, this week we must catapult two years into the future to rejoin our musical heroine. The reason has to do with the odd nature of the Studio System in general and this series in specific. Judy Garland actually shot two movies between 1944 and 1945, but because one was delayed due to reshoots (therefore getting bumped to next week) and the other was a straight drama (therefore not fitting a series focused on musical numbers), we must travel through the end of WW2 and the beginning of Judy Garland's marriage to Vincente Minnelli. Thus, in 1946 we arrive in... the Old West? 

 

The Movie: The Harvey Girls (1946)

The Songwriters: Johnny Mercer (lyrics), Harry Warren (music)

The Players: Judy Garland, Angela Lansbury, Ray Bolger, »

- Anne Marie

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Judy by the Numbers: "The Trolley Song"

25 May 2016 5:01 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Anne Marie is tracking Judy Garland's career through musical numbers...

It's difficult to overstate the importance of Meet Me in St. Louis to the myth that is Judy GarlandThe Wizard of Oz guaranteed Judy immortality at age 17, but the 1944 Freed musical would be the first Garland product to assemble the pieces of her myth beyond her larger-than-life talent. Though Meet Me in St. Louis is usually known as arguably the best "adult" performance by Judy Garland in an MGM musical, this time the alternately exciting and exhausting events offscreen would be as important to her image as her sparkling turn in Technicolor as Esther Smith.

 

The Movie: Meet Me In St. Louis (1944)

The Songwriters: Hugh Martin (lyrics), Ralph Blane (music)

The Players: Judy Garland, Mary Astor, Margaret O'Brien, Lucille Bremer, Leon Ames, directed by Vincente Minnelli

 

The Story: Long after the completion of Meet Me In St. Louis, »

- Anne Marie

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All the Colors Left With You: Grieving in Life and "The Courtship of Eddie's Father"

1 May 2016 7:28 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

On January 22nd of this year I lost someone very close to me. The someone I was closest to, in fact. She was (is) my best friend, my daughter. The love of my life a lot of people say, though this someone wasn’t actually a person. She was better—she was a dog. A nearly 19-year-old Silver Dapple Dachshund named Elizabeth Alaina Freeman, Libby for short. I got her when I was 11 and going through my Queen Elizabeth I phase. I was there when she was born, was the first person she saw when she opened her eyes and the first to hold her. As fate mercifully had it, I was also the last person she saw and the last one to hold her. She died in my arms while I was sleeping. I woke to find her looking at me, eyes unmoving.Last week I turned 30. It was »

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Giveaway – Win Must-See Musicals: 10 Film Collection

2 March 2016 3:30 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Sing-a-long with Hollywood’s most beloved musicals this Mother’s Day!

To celebrate the release of the beautifully packaged collector’s box set Must-see Musicals: 10 Film Collection – featuring some of Hollywood’s most beloved musical classics – we have a copy to giveaway!

This guaranteed feel-good collection provides hours of infectious, heart-warming, toe-tapping viewing, with iconic dance routines and stunning production design, that you’ll want to return to again and again.

Must-see Musicals: 10 Film Collection comes in a presentation box decorated with artwork from the original film posters and makes an attractive addition to any DVD collection!

Includes 42nd Street, Meet Me in St. Louis, Easter Parade, Annie Get Your Gun, Singin’ in the Rain, The Band Wagon, Calamity Jane, A Star is Born, High Society and Gypsy.

You can pre-order via Amazon UK.

The competition closes at midnight on Sunday, March 20th. UK readers only please. To enter, use one of the following methods… »

- Gary Collinson

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Personal Ballots Cont'd: Best Cinematography & Production Design

28 January 2016 9:30 AM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

We're almost done with the Oscar Correlative categories in the Film Bitch Awards. Then it's on to the silly & fun but still seriously chosen "extra" categories. Here are my choices for the best men behind the camera (always men. sigh) and the men and women designing and decorating those sets and the film's overall visual palette for your eye-candy pleasure. 

Best Cinematography

The big Oscar question this year is "Can Emmanuel Lubezki" win a third consecutive Oscar for The Revenant. He's dominated the category the past two years with Gravity (2013) and Birdman (2014). It won't be the longest consecutive winning streak ever -- that belongs to Walt Disney who won consistently in short film categories for seemingly ever in the early days of Oscar -- but it will be the single longest streak in modern history if he pulls it off. But the category already has something for the record books: »

- NATHANIEL R

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12 Classic Movie Musicals

21 January 2016 10:00 AM, PST | backstage.com | See recent Backstage news »

Some of our favorite films are from another era. These 12 movie musicals are more than 50 years old, but their catchy tunes, star performances, and exciting dance sequences make them films for the ages. “Meet Me in St. Louis” (1944)This early movie-musical from MGM stars Judy Garland, Lucille Bremer, Margaret O’Brien, and Joan Carroll as four sisters coming of age around the 1904 World’s Fair. The film follows a timeless tale of young love—set against the backdrop of family and a changing world—and features famous songs including “The Trolley Song” and “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas.”  “A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court” (1949)Bing Crosby brings this 19th Century Mark Twain classic to life, depicting an all-American mechanic who inadvertently time travels to sixth century England. The film was adapted from the hit 1927 Broadway musical, and remains a classic for its far-fetched plot and upbeat romantic numbers. »

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005

8 items from 2016


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