Meet Me in St. Louis (1944) - News Poster

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Daddy’S Home 2 – Review

The holiday movie season is in full swing this weekend with a yuletime-set sequel to a recent raucous comedy…again. Yes, it was barely ten days ago when a really early cinema gift arrived at the multiplex, Bad Moms Christmas. Well there are a couple of differences, this new flick is a follow-up to a 2015 release rather than the more recent, just over a year old Bad Moms. Plus the matriarchs’ antics are a tad more adult-themed, since both films garnered much-deserved “R” ratings for raunch. The new arrival is the more “family friendly” PG-13 (it might be even more wholesome than the first one, since there’s less talk of fertility). However both recent installment deal with the chaos and conflict initiated by the visit of the grandparents (Moms had one grandpop’ while this one doesn’t have a granny’ till the last moments). So, put those shopping lists
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Soundtracking: "Meet Me In St. Louis"

The 1944 Smackdown is coming, so Chris looks at that year's musical masterpiece...

They don’t get much more timeless than Vincente Minnelli’s Meet Me In St. Louis. It’s a musical about the family unit, and fittingly almost all of the numbers take place in the home. Whether in party revelry or the everyday household ubiquity of the title song, music is as much a definitive tradition of the Smith family as anything else. Grandpa may screw up the words, and it may be past the youngest’s bedtime, but music is one of the things that bind them. It also helps when one of the daughters is Judy Garland, I suppose.

Though St. Louis has relatively few musical numbers (unless you count umpteen reprises of that title song), its percentage of classics is nearly as high as its joy levels. “The Trolley Song” is the kind of showstopper
See full article at FilmExperience »

See Lin-Manuel Miranda Sing Show Tunes on the ‘Secret Congress Train’ During His Selfie-Filled Trip to D.C.

See Lin-Manuel Miranda Sing Show Tunes on the ‘Secret Congress Train’ During His Selfie-Filled Trip to D.C.
Lin-Manuel Miranda is having the best trip to Washington, D.C. — and is documenting the highlights on Twitter.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning Hamilton composer spent Wednesday meeting with members of Congress on Capitol Hill, pushing them to preserve the $150 million in funding for the National Endowments for the Arts and Humanities currently on the chopping block in President Donald Trump‘s initial budget proposal.

Working with the National Humanities Alliance, Miranda, 37, held meetings with everyone from New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, Congressman Adriano Espaillat and California Representative Maxine Waters to Vermont Senator Patrick Leahy and Alaska Senator Lisa Murkowski — sharing selfies
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The Glass Castle – Review

With just a few weeks left in the big Summer season, Hollywood hopes to get a slight jump on the serious Fall/Winter awards time with an adaptation of an acclaimed biographical novel. Oh, and it’s a “heart-tugger’ about an offbeat family. Now, such movies can be heartwarming like Meet Me In St. Louis and I Remember Mama, or countless other syrupy-sweet homages to home and hearth. And then there’s the opposite, the tough profiles of hard lives with difficult heads of the household like The Great Santini or (gasp) Mommie Dearest. Really, this new flick could almost be “Daddy Dearest”, as its main focus is a man who made life difficult for his offspring, due partly to his boozing, but mainly because he could never really realize his dreams, particularly his elaborate, unmade plans for The Glass Castle.

Those blueprints are a long ago memory for successful
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

June 1977: When New Hollywood Got Weird

Last month, coverage of the 40th anniversary of Star Wars was understandably extensive, with pop-culture publications, daily newspapers, and TV media commemorating a film that by all rights changed the landscape of Hollywood, for better or worse. Conversely, there will likely be relatively little retrospective celebration for William Friedkin’s Sorcerer or Martin Scorsese’s New York, New York, two terrific films released roughly one month later in the week of June 19-25. Though they weren’t the first examples of New Hollywood directors following huge successes with more difficult works that flopped (Peter Bogdanovich’s secretly lovely At Long Last Love comes to mind), they stood in 1977 as back-to-back examples of talented filmmakers – one Oscar-winning, the other well on his way to becoming the most-acclaimed director of his generation – overreaching and failing after becoming a bit too full of themselves.

That is, of course, an oversimplification, just as the other charge popularized by the likes of Peter Biskind – i.e. George Lucas’ grand space opera and Steven Spielberg’s personal blockbusters killed Hollywood’s interest in movies for adults – is an oversimplification. In all truth, it isn’t surprising that audiences didn’t go for Sorcerer or New York, New York, two especially challenging-for-the-mainstream features that pushed their creators’ aesthetics to greater extremes than before while tracking in subject matter that was pessimistic even for the time. But while both films and their troubled productions saw directors burned by their ambition, they are also exceptional works showcasing how exhilarating it can be when all commercial sense goes out the window.

Friedkin’s Sorcerer can lay more claim to having been actively harmed by the arrival of Lucas’ megahit, arriving exactly one month later, on June 25, and competing for a thrill-seeking crowd. (One theater reportedly pulled Star Wars for Sorcerer for a week, only to replace it when Friedkin’s film failed to lure an audience.) The film, a remake of Henri-Georges Clouzot’s 1953 masterpiece The Wages of Fear, was also hurt by its confusing title — named after one of the trucks transporting dynamite through a dangerous jungle to put out an oil fire — and a budget that ballooned from an initially planned $15 million to $22 million following a difficult production.

Friedkin, hot off the Oscar-winning The French Connection and hugely successful The Exorcist, already had a reputation for his temperament and arrogance. They were in full force on Sorcerer: he clashed with cinematographer Dick Bush, who left halfway through filming, as well as producer David Salven, whom Friedkin fired after fights over the expensive location shoots. Friedkin extensively clashed with Paramount brass, sometimes reasonably (kicking executives off set after perceived interference), sometimes amusingly but questionably (the evil oil execs pictured in the film are actually Gulf & Western’s executive board, and they repaid him by not promoting the film). The jungle shoot itself was hell, with about 50 people quitting following injury or illness while Friedkin himself contracted malaria and lost 50 pounds.

But it’s only appropriate that the making of Sorcerer was so desperate, given the story it tells. Friedkin’s worldview has always been bleak and cynical, and Sorcerer may be the purest expression of that. Its heroes are a hard-bitten New Jersey hood (a spectacularly testy Roy Scheider) hiding out after shooting a mobster’s brother, a crooked French banker (Bruno Cremer) on the run following fraud accusations, a Palestinian terrorist (Amidou) behind a Jerusalem bombing, and a Mexican hitman (Francisco Rabal) who gets in on the job after murdering the fourth driver (Karl John), apparently a fugitive Nazi. The film presents their crimes as facts and without real judgment, their rottenness just another bad part of a burned-out, brutal world.

Where The French Connection and The Exorcist gave viewers visceral thrills early on and some sense of right and wrong (even if it’s fatally compromised), the early action in Sorcerer is more painful, with suicide, terrorism, and the loss of friends and partners forming the four prologues introducing the men at this film’s center. Friedkin then drops us into squalor and despair in a small South American town where the heat and rain are nearly as oppressive as the police state, the work is dangerous and pays little, and the mud seems to soak up any sense of hope. It’s little wonder that they might take up the dangerous assignment of driving through an arduous jungle landscape with unstable explosives that could set off at any moment. When you’ve been driven into no man’s land by your sins, any way out is worth it — no matter how unlikely it is that you’ll survive.

The actual drive up to the oil well doesn’t begin until about halfway through and takes on the tone of an unusually fraught funeral march for the protagonists. Friedkin’s immediate, docurealistic style helps ground the proceedings as set-pieces grow more heightened, most memorably when the drivers guide their trucks over a deteriorating bridge as the river beneath it overflows — the most expensive sequence in the film, as well as the most difficult-to-shoot of Friedkin’s career. As Popeye Doyle’s car chase in The French Connection and Regan & Chris MacNeil getting jerked around in The Exorcist evince, Friedkin always had a gift for making scenes that were already dangerous in conception even more tactile and nerve-wracking. Here, his emphasis on the mechanics of the crossing – the snapping rope and wood – as well as the fragility of the bodies attempting to cross (particularly as one rider steps outside to guide the truck and risks getting thrown off or crushed in the process) make the danger of their situation all the more palpable.

Yet there’s a more existential doom permeating the film compared with the nihilism of his earlier efforts, a more complete melding of his hard-bitten style with expressionistic touches that peppered The Exorcist. Part of that comes from Tangerine Dream’s ethereal score, which accentuates a sense that the elements are set against the drivers. But Friedkin also lends the film’s grungy look a sort of otherworldly menace, whether the camera soars through gorgeous greenery while a fire burns in the background or Scheider envisions a stream of blood soaking the dirt. Even the small moments of beauty (e.g. a butterfly hiding from the rain or a woman briefly dancing with Scheider) seem to tease the protagonists and underline their utter hopelessness. By the time we reach a grim conclusion, Friedkin has taken us through a world without mercy or decency, in which fate mocks even the most resilient of us.

Martin Scorsese’s New York, New York, released just a few days earlier on June 21, was less plausibly affected by the release of Star Wars, and more likely the victim of critics and audiences being put off by its mix of glossy, Vincente Minnelli-esque musicality and aggressive, John Cassavetes-influenced verisimilitude. Scorsese, with the story of a creative and personal relationship collapsing under the weight of jealousy in a postwar environment, sought to bring to the forefront the unhappiness lurking under the surface of films such as Meet Me in St. Louis and My Dream is Yours.

It, like Sorcerer, had a difficult production, with the director battling a severe cocaine addiction while breaking up with then-wife Julia Cameron and carrying out an affair with lead actress Liza Minnelli. The film’s herky-jerky rhythms and circular intensity seem to take cues from that tension, the big-band musical numbers clashing with deliberately repetitive improvisations and screaming matches. Scorsese had mixed realism with melodrama (Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore) and grit with florid formalism (Taxi Driver) previously, and would go on to marry his classic and New Hollywood interests more palatably in Raging Bull. But New York, New York isn’t a marriage so much as it’s a push-pull war, one that’s sometimes exhausting.

Acknowledging the unattainability of Hollywood fantasies makes it no less vital a love letter. Scorsese opens with an astonishing crane shot on V-j Day as Robert De Niro’s Jimmy gets lost in the excitement of a crowd, only to appear under an arrow that both pinpoints and isolates him. De Niro’s first interactions with Minnelli’s Francine, meanwhile, are less a meet-cute, more an ongoing, insistent harassment that eventually wears down her defenses. The entire opening sequence communicates a sense of spiritual and personal emptiness amid celebration, an early warning that not all is well in the postwar era.

De Niro continues playing Jimmy as a halfway point between his insecure, jealous bruiser in Raging Bull and his relentless, obnoxious pest in The King of Comedy, but Scorsese finds some truth in his and Francine’s romance (even as it’s rotting from the inside out) in their musical performances, with the two finding a better balance and greater chemistry as they perform “You Brought a New Kind of Love to Me.” Their partnership flourishes out of a mutual recognition of talent — or, in his case, recognition of greater possible success together. Still, that balance begins to tip whenever Francine asserts herself, as in a scene where she tries to pep up the band following one of Jimmy’s criticisms, only for him to tear her down. And the film’s most gorgeous images undermine any possibility of happiness between the two, with De Niro proposing (badly: “I love you… I mean, I don’t love you. I dig you; I like you a lot”) in front of a fake forest.

Purposefully, the film’s first two hours give more emphasis to Scorsese’s more discursive side, major arguments between Jimmy and Francine getting interrupted by Jimmy’s ability to get into a minor argument with anyone he encounters. It’s in the final third that focus shifts to the director’s inner formalist and New York, New York turns into a proper musical with the remarkably bittersweet “Happy Endings” sequence. Francine’s finally given a chance to flourish as a performer, unhindered by Jimmy’s jealousy, and Scorsese jumps into an unabashedly stagey finale not unlike that of The Band Wagon or An American in Paris.

Yet the climax still reflects the inherent unhappiness in Francine’s life, telling a story of a relationship ended by success, only to double back and conclude with a wish-fulfillment coda that only makes it more painful. We’ve already seen the truth in the lives of Francine and Jimmy, and no rousing performance of “Theme from ‘New York, New York’” is going to change that. Their final encounter twists the knife further, giving one last tease of possible reconciliation before recognizing that it’s impossible, leaving Jimmy with a final, lonely shot echoing that V-j Day opening.

Audiences and critics largely rejected New York, New York and Sorcerer, with neither film making its budget back or earning the raves their makers had come to expect, but time has been kind to both. They haven’t exactly seen widespread reevaluation as their makers’ best works — Sorcerer wouldn’t be too far off for this writer, and Scorsese’s film has its passionate advocates — but they’ve developed cult followings and at least partly shaken off their previous distinctions as merely ambitious follies. Perhaps it’s appropriate that they’re not as widely cited as Taxi Driver and The Exorcist – they’re pricklier than their more popular predecessors, better suited as advanced viewing than introductory works. They may not generate thousands upon thousands of appreciations 40 years later, but they’re there, waiting for curious viewers to make a discovery.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Scott Reviews Charles Vidor’s Cover Girl [Masters of Cinema Blu-ray Review]

How did a film like Cover Girl slip away? When it was shown at the TCM Classic Film Festival in 2012, it was considered something of a discovery, with Robert Osborne frequently singling it out in pre-festival interviews and publicity as a must-see, which makes me feel a little better about having not heard of it at all before seeing it a few months prior at the New Beverly. But the film was immensely popular in its day. Its success instantly pulled Gene Kelly out of limbo at MGM, where he’d been assigned to a series of B-movies and rarely allowed to dance his own choreography, when he was even allowed to dance at all.

Columbia Pictures was not interested in placing such limitations on him. The film’s producer, composer Arthur Schwartz, must have known how lucky they were, because they gave Kelly immense control over its production, especially his dance numbers.
See full article at CriterionCast »

What Are You Watching?: Vincente Minnelli’s kinky Technicolor flop

What Are You Watching? is a weekly space for The A.V Club’s film critics and readers to share their thoughts, observations, and opinions on movies new and old.

Vincente Minnelli’s famous musicals—among them Meet Me In St. Louis and An American In Paris—tend to eclipse his 1948 Technicolor flop The Pirate, one of his richest and strangest works. One of his kinkiest, too. Minnelli himself considered it a surrealist film. Judy Garland, to whom he was married at the time, plays Manuela, a virginal orphan who has been arranged to marry the middle-aged Don Pedro (Walter Slezak) but fantasizes about being kidnapped and ravished by the legendary murderous pirate Macoco. Gene Kelly plays Serafin, a horny, vain actor who gets the hots for Manuela, learns of her unladylike desires by way of a hypnosis-induced song-and-dance number, and proceeds to masquerade as the infamous criminal by ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Great Job, Internet!: How La La Land took inspiration from one particular MGM director

Apparently, no one’s sick of talking about La La Land yet, as more behind-the-scenes pieces, homages, and takeoffs keep pouring in as we get closer to the movie’s likely Oscar sweep. Most know that the film itself is an homage to classic Hollywood musicals. But in a new short video, Frame By Frame has examined its tie to one director in particular: Vincente Minnelli (a.k.a. Liza’s dad and Judy Garland’s second husband). Minnelli helmed musicals in the golden MGM era like Meet Me In St. Louis, An American In Paris, and Gigi. Frame By Frame’s film theorists point out Damien Chazelle used many of Minnelli’s specific techniques—like long tracking shots, surrealism, even the bold use of color—which helped La La Land stand out just as much as Gigi.

It’s a granular, educational examination for musical buffs, although the “stolen
See full article at The AV Club »

Will Musicals See a ‘La La Land’ Boost?

Will Musicals See a ‘La La Land’ Boost?
The rap on musicals used to be “audiences don’t want to see people breaking into song.” Now that “La La Land” has charmed audiences by doing just that, what does it mean for the future of live-action screen musicals?

“Whatever musicals come next will have to be good. That’s the test,” says Justin Paul, one of the Oscar-nominated lyricists for “La La Land.” “I have to believe that other studios, other producers, would only be encouraged by the impact of ‘La La Land,’ both critically and at the box office.”

Adds fellow “La La Land” lyricist Benj Pasek: “We feel like our generation has been so primed for musical content. We grew up with the resurgence of Disney animation and all that followed from that. In hindsight, it makes sense that people would be receptive; so many of us grew up with our first stories being told through song.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Judy Garland’s Five Husbands: How the Men in Her Life Tried to Save Her from Tragedy

Judy Garland’s Five Husbands: How the Men in Her Life Tried to Save Her from Tragedy
Her iconic character Dorothy set out to find happiness “Over the Rainbow” in The Wizard of Oz. But off-screen, Judy Garland‘s quest for peace was plagued by insecurity, depression and drug abuse.

By her side throughout the young star’s life were her five husbands, who each witnessed her struggle with her inner demons.

Sadly, love couldn’t save Garland, who died in 1969 from a barbiturate overdose. She was 47.

Here, the stories behind her marriages and the men in Garland’s life.

David Rose (1941–1944)

David Rose was already a successful composer and orchestra leader when he first met Garland
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Have Yourself A Movie Little Christmas: 2016 Edition

I’m guessing that you, just like most of us, have always had seasonal favorites when it comes to movies that attempt to address and evoke the spirit of Christmas. Like most from my generation, when I was a kid I learned the pleasures of perennial anticipation of Christmastime as interpreted by TV through a series of holiday specials, like How the Grinch Stole Christmas, A Charlie Brown Christmas, Santa Claus is Coming to Town and even musical variety hours where the likes of Bing Crosby and Andy Williams and Dean Martin et al would sit around sets elaborately designed to represent the ideal Christmas-decorated living room, drinking “wassail” (I’m sure that’s what was in those cups) and crooning classics of the season alongside a dazzling array of guests. (We knew we were moving into a new world of holiday cheer when David Bowie joined Bing Crosby for
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Joan Carroll, Child Actress in 'Meet Me in St. Louis' and 'The Bells of St. Mary's,' Dies at 85

Joan Carroll, Child Actress in 'Meet Me in St. Louis' and 'The Bells of St. Mary's,' Dies at 85
Joan Carroll, a former child star who appeared in Meet Me in St. Louis opposite Judy Garland and The Bells of St. Mary's with Bing Crosby, has died. She was 85.

Carroll died Nov. 16 near her home in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, her son, Joe Krack, told The Hollywood Reporter.

Carroll played Garland's younger sister Agnes, who pulls a dangerous prank with the youngest sister, Tootie (Margaret O'Brien), in Meet Me in St. Louis (1944). The actress was sidelined for a few days during filming after she needed an emergency appendectomy.

...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Tiff 2016. Correspondences #5

  • MUBI
Salt and FireDear Danny,Funny you mention genre, as A Quiet Passion would seem to belong to my least favorite one: the biopic. Or not really, for directors create their own genres, great ones do, and Terence Davies is among the greatest now at work. His Emily Dickinson, splendidly embodied by Cynthia Nixon, is no genteel figurine reciting favorite verses but a sharp and unyielding intelligence twisting in a severe body and a severe era. Right from the start, refusing to move to one side or another when her seminary is divided according to faith, she will not give an inch. (“You are alone in your rebellion,” snaps the headmistress, crucifix looming in the background.) At her Massachusetts family home, words—not just the budding poetess’ stanzas, but bon mots, barbs, any curlicues of witty verbiage—are cherished cracks in staid domesticity, like the songs in Meet Me in St. Louis.
See full article at MUBI »

NYC Weekend Watch: Double Bills, ‘Inherent Vice’ on 70mm, Kurosawa, Minnelli & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film Forum

Cinema’s holy trinity — Ed Wood (technically Burton-Wood), Malick, and Chaplin — have two-for-one double-billings this weekend.

Howards End continues its run.

Museum of the Moving Image

“See It Big! The 70mm Show” concludes with Kenneth Branagh‘s Hamlet and Inherent Vice.

If you missed it in theaters, see the great Kaili Blues when
See full article at The Film Stage »

Judy by the Numbers: "On The Atchison Topeka And The Santa Fe"

Anne Marie is tracking Judy Garland's career through musical numbers...

Though we last left Judy Garland in 1944 crooning from a trolley and cementing a (troubled) place in Hollywood history, this week we must catapult two years into the future to rejoin our musical heroine. The reason has to do with the odd nature of the Studio System in general and this series in specific. Judy Garland actually shot two movies between 1944 and 1945, but because one was delayed due to reshoots (therefore getting bumped to next week) and the other was a straight drama (therefore not fitting a series focused on musical numbers), we must travel through the end of WW2 and the beginning of Judy Garland's marriage to Vincente Minnelli. Thus, in 1946 we arrive in... the Old West? 

 

The Movie: The Harvey Girls (1946)

The Songwriters: Johnny Mercer (lyrics), Harry Warren (music)

The Players: Judy Garland, Angela Lansbury, Ray Bolger,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Judy by the Numbers: "The Trolley Song"

Anne Marie is tracking Judy Garland's career through musical numbers...

It's difficult to overstate the importance of Meet Me in St. Louis to the myth that is Judy GarlandThe Wizard of Oz guaranteed Judy immortality at age 17, but the 1944 Freed musical would be the first Garland product to assemble the pieces of her myth beyond her larger-than-life talent. Though Meet Me in St. Louis is usually known as arguably the best "adult" performance by Judy Garland in an MGM musical, this time the alternately exciting and exhausting events offscreen would be as important to her image as her sparkling turn in Technicolor as Esther Smith.

 

The Movie: Meet Me In St. Louis (1944)

The Songwriters: Hugh Martin (lyrics), Ralph Blane (music)

The Players: Judy Garland, Mary Astor, Margaret O'Brien, Lucille Bremer, Leon Ames, directed by Vincente Minnelli

 

The Story: Long after the completion of Meet Me In St. Louis,
See full article at FilmExperience »

All the Colors Left With You: Grieving in Life and "The Courtship of Eddie's Father"

On January 22nd of this year I lost someone very close to me. The someone I was closest to, in fact. She was (is) my best friend, my daughter. The love of my life a lot of people say, though this someone wasn’t actually a person. She was better—she was a dog. A nearly 19-year-old Silver Dapple Dachshund named Elizabeth Alaina Freeman, Libby for short. I got her when I was 11 and going through my Queen Elizabeth I phase. I was there when she was born, was the first person she saw when she opened her eyes and the first to hold her. As fate mercifully had it, I was also the last person she saw and the last one to hold her. She died in my arms while I was sleeping. I woke to find her looking at me, eyes unmoving.Last week I turned 30. It was
See full article at MUBI »

Giveaway – Win Must-See Musicals: 10 Film Collection

Sing-a-long with Hollywood’s most beloved musicals this Mother’s Day!

To celebrate the release of the beautifully packaged collector’s box set Must-see Musicals: 10 Film Collection – featuring some of Hollywood’s most beloved musical classics – we have a copy to giveaway!

This guaranteed feel-good collection provides hours of infectious, heart-warming, toe-tapping viewing, with iconic dance routines and stunning production design, that you’ll want to return to again and again.

Must-see Musicals: 10 Film Collection comes in a presentation box decorated with artwork from the original film posters and makes an attractive addition to any DVD collection!

Includes 42nd Street, Meet Me in St. Louis, Easter Parade, Annie Get Your Gun, Singin’ in the Rain, The Band Wagon, Calamity Jane, A Star is Born, High Society and Gypsy.

You can pre-order via Amazon UK.

The competition closes at midnight on Sunday, March 20th. UK readers only please. To enter, use one of the following methods…
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Personal Ballots Cont'd: Best Cinematography & Production Design

We're almost done with the Oscar Correlative categories in the Film Bitch Awards. Then it's on to the silly & fun but still seriously chosen "extra" categories. Here are my choices for the best men behind the camera (always men. sigh) and the men and women designing and decorating those sets and the film's overall visual palette for your eye-candy pleasure. 

Best Cinematography

The big Oscar question this year is "Can Emmanuel Lubezki" win a third consecutive Oscar for The Revenant. He's dominated the category the past two years with Gravity (2013) and Birdman (2014). It won't be the longest consecutive winning streak ever -- that belongs to Walt Disney who won consistently in short film categories for seemingly ever in the early days of Oscar -- but it will be the single longest streak in modern history if he pulls it off. But the category already has something for the record books:
See full article at FilmExperience »

12 Classic Movie Musicals

Some of our favorite films are from another era. These 12 movie musicals are more than 50 years old, but their catchy tunes, star performances, and exciting dance sequences make them films for the ages. “Meet Me in St. Louis” (1944)This early movie-musical from MGM stars Judy Garland, Lucille Bremer, Margaret O’Brien, and Joan Carroll as four sisters coming of age around the 1904 World’s Fair. The film follows a timeless tale of young love—set against the backdrop of family and a changing world—and features famous songs including “The Trolley Song” and “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas.” “A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court” (1949)Bing Crosby brings this 19th Century Mark Twain classic to life, depicting an all-American mechanic who inadvertently time travels to sixth century England. The film was adapted from the hit 1927 Broadway musical, and remains a classic for its far-fetched plot and upbeat romantic numbers.
See full article at Backstage »
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