6.1/10
70
4 user

Knickerbocker Holiday (1944)

It's 1650 in New Amsterdam, and Brom Broeck, a young outspoken newspaper publisher is arrested for printing advanced opinions on the undemocratic rule of Govenor "Peg-Leg" Stuyvesant. While... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(from the play by), (from the play by) | 4 more credits »
Reviews
Nominated for 1 Oscar. See more awards »
Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
...
...
...
Ulda Tienhoven (as Shelley Winter)
Johnnie Davis ...
Tenpin (as Johnny 'Scat' Davis)
...
Schermerhorn
...
Roosevelt
...
Poffenburgh
...
Tammany
...
Gypsy Dancer
Edit

Storyline

It's 1650 in New Amsterdam, and Brom Broeck, a young outspoken newspaper publisher is arrested for printing advanced opinions on the undemocratic rule of Govenor "Peg-Leg" Stuyvesant. While Brom is in prison, old "Peg-Leg" goes on the make for Brom's sweetheart. But, when "Peg-Leg" is forced to release Brom... Watch-out! Written by Kelly

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

She had what it takes---and the boys all wanted it! (original poster) See more »


Certificate:

See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

17 March 1944 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Cidade Que Dança  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Washington Irving, author of "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow", was a prominent character in the stage version of this musical, where he was played by Ray Middleton; however, he was completely omitted from the film version. See more »

Connections

Referenced in You Bet Your Life: Episode #5.35 (1955) See more »

Soundtracks

Zuyder Zee
(uncredited)
Lyrics by Sammy Cahn
Music by Jule Styne
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Entertaining adaptation of the Kurt Weill Broadway musical.

An odd combo for writing a Broadway musical - Kurt Weill and serious dramatist, Maxwell Anderson - but write it they did, amused by the NYC corruption that existed back in 1647 under the Dutch rule of Peter Stuyvesant and the then current 1940s political atmosphere. Charles Coburn, complete with pegleg, essays the role of Stuyvesant, played and sung on stage by Walter Huston - high point of the score is SEPTEMBER SONG. Nelson Eddy and Constance Dowling do well as the revolutionary firebrand against corruption and for a federation of the colonies under a democracy (horrors!) and his vivacious sweetheart. The plot takes turn poking political fun at the corrupt Dutch businessmen and guiding the effervescent Tina away from the grasp of the elderly Stuyvesant and into the arms of Brom (Nelson Eddy). The score consists of nine numbers that are all lively and well-written (the score combined parts of the Weill original and new songs written by Jule Styne and a quartet of lyricists and the background scoring is quite well done (Oscar nomination for Scoring). The sets and costumes are also very good and were deserving of similar recognition but failed to garner votes - in the latter case the category wasn't invented until 3 years later. Nothing extraordinary but very amusing and jolly and well done.


11 of 11 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?