6.0/10
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Knickerbocker Holiday (1944)

It's 1650 in New Amsterdam, and Brom Broeck, a young outspoken newspaper publisher is arrested for printing advanced opinions on the undemocratic rule of Govenor "Peg-Leg" Stuyvesant. While... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(from the play by), (from the play by) | 4 more credits »
Reviews
Nominated for 1 Oscar. See more awards »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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Ulda Tienhoven (as Shelley Winter)
Johnnie Davis ...
Tenpin (as Johnny 'Scat' Davis)
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Schermerhorn
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Roosevelt
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Poffenburgh
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Tammany
Carmen Amaya ...
Gypsy Dancer
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Storyline

It's 1650 in New Amsterdam, and Brom Broeck, a young outspoken newspaper publisher is arrested for printing advanced opinions on the undemocratic rule of Govenor "Peg-Leg" Stuyvesant. While Brom is in prison, old "Peg-Leg" goes on the make for Brom's sweetheart. But, when "Peg-Leg" is forced to release Brom... Watch-out! Written by Kelly

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

1650s | based on play | See All (2) »

Taglines:

She had what it takes---and the boys all wanted it! (original poster) See more »


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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

17 March 1944 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Cidade Que Dança  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Washington Irving, author of "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow", was a prominent character in the stage version of this musical, where he was played by Ray Middleton; however, he was completely omitted from the film version. See more »

Connections

Version of Pulitzer Prize Playhouse: Knickerbocker Holiday (1950) See more »

Soundtracks

Jail Song (Oh Woe!)
(uncredited)
Music by Kurt Weill
Lyrics by Nelson Eddy and Forman Brown
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User Reviews

 
Breezy Fun
26 October 2009 | by (Canada) – See all my reviews

There is no denying that is a low budget film, especially compared to Eddy's MGM classics. Yet there is something very satisfying about this musical. Eddy plays a small publisher who dares to criticize the local government. Charles Coburn is the visiting Governor, who is a scheming crook only interested in bettering his personal situation. The two men are sure to have a conflict. The conflict is heightened when Coburn meets Eddy's lady, the delightful Constance Dowling, and he takes a romantic interest in the lady.

If this all sounds very dramatic, it is not. The film has it's tongue firmly in it's cheek throughout and the comedy parts are the film's strength. Of note, the print I purchased on Bonanza did include September Song as I understand the song is deleted in some prints. However, it should be noted the song is sung by Charles Coburn, not Eddy. And finally, I'd like to say how much I enjoyed the films opening musical number. The song is very catchy and the production is very amusing and well done.


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