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17 Shakespeare Films Worth Watching

Though there’s nothing like seeing Shakespeare live on stage, the magic of cinema can bring new light to the Bard's classic works—and can allow us to view timeless performances over and over again. How many great Shakespearean performances have you seen at the movies? Here are 17 film versions of Shakespeare that all actors must watch. “Henry V” (1944, Sir Laurence Olivier)Partially funded by the British government following the devastation of World War II, this widely lauded film adaptation of a Globe Theatre production earned Olivier a special honorary Academy Award for his work as actor, producer, and director. “Hamlet” (1948, Sir Laurence Olivier)Olivier created another impactful turn with this acclaimed (if not perfectly faithful to the text) adaption of one of Shakespeare’s greatest works. Starring as the title role, Olivier carefully focused his directorial narrative on the characters’ psychological turmoil, removing the characters of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern entirely.
See full article at Backstage »

Talking Pictures acquires 100+ films

  • ScreenDaily
Titles include classics such as The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp.

UK digital channel Talking Pictures TV has acquired some of the most iconic titles in British film history in two major library deals with ITV Studios Global Entertainment and the Samuel Goldwyn and Woodfall libraries, distributed by Miramax.

Talking Pictures TV, which broadcasts classic British movies on the Freeview and Sky platforms, has secured rights to more than 70 films from the ITV Studios Global Entertainment library and 33 films from the Samuel Goldwyn and Woodfall libraries through Miramax.

The ITV Studios Global Entertainment deal includes Lawrence Olivier’s Henry V; Reach For The Sky; Whistle Down The Wind; In Which We Serve; The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp; Hell Drivers; The Bulldog Breed; Séance on a Wet Afternoon; Defence of the Realm and Tarka The Otter.

Among the seminal films included in the Samuel Goldwyn and Woodfall deal are: The Entertainer; Loneliness of the Long
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Best Picture and Better Picture: Movies That Should Have Won the Oscar but Didn’t

  • Cinelinx
The best picture doesn’t always win Best Picture. Sometimes the best film of the year gets robbed. Cinelinx looks at the movies which should have won Best Picture but didn’t.

Whenever the Best Picture winner is announced at the Oscars, sometimes we say, “Yeah, that deserved to win,” but then again, sometimes we say, “Huh? Are they kidding me?!” There are a lot of backstage politics and extenuating factors in Hollywood that can determine which film wins the big trophy. The worthiest film doesn’t always take the statue home. Going back over the 88-year history of the Academy Awards, we look at which films didn’t really deserve to win and the ones which rightfully should have won.

The Best Pictures and the Better Pictures:

1927-8: The Winner-Wings

What should have won: Sunrise (Sunrise was given a special award for Artistic Quality of Production, but it
See full article at Cinelinx »

17 Shakespeare Films Worth Watching

Though there’s nothing like seeing Shakespeare live on stage, the magic of cinema can bring new light to the Bard's classic works—and can allow us to view timeless performances over and over again. How many great Shakespearean performances have you seen at the movies? Here are 17 film versions of Shakespeare that all actors must watch. “Henry V” (1944, Sir Laurence Olivier)Partially funded by the British government following the devastation of World War II, this widely lauded film adaptation of a Globe Theatre production earned Olivier a special honorary Academy Award for his work as actor, producer, and director. “Hamlet” (1948, Sir Laurence Olivier)Olivier created another impactful turn with this acclaimed (if not perfectly faithful to the text) adaption of one of Shakespeare’s greatest works. Starring as the title role, Olivier carefully focused his directorial narrative on the characters’ psychological turmoil, removing the characters of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern entirely.
See full article at Backstage »

Close-Up on "Hard to Be a God" and the Medieval in European Cinema

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a column that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Hard to Be a God is playing on Mubi in the Us through January 2.Hard to Be a GodRussian director Aleksei German spent the final 15 years of his life working on Hard To Be A God (2013), a brutal medieval epic adapted from a 1964 novel of the same name by Arkady and Boris Strutgatsky, dying just before he could complete the job in February 2013. Happily, his son and widow were able to oversee the final sound mix. The result is one of the most immersive and harrowing cinematic experiences going, three hours of being put to the sword and mired in the mud, blood and viscera of a nightmare alternate reality.Although German's characters are dressed in the clanking armour, chainmail and robes of the European Middle Ages, Hard To Be A God is in fact set on a distant planet,
See full article at MUBI »

Watch Sarah Silverman, Stephen Colbert Recite Kids' Bad Jokes

Watch Sarah Silverman, Stephen Colbert Recite Kids' Bad Jokes
Sarah Silverman is known for her acerbic, explicit sense of humor, but on Late Show With Stephen Colbert Tuesday, the comedian produced a different sort of comedy: Reciting unfunny jokes written by children. Colbert told Silverman that one of his favorite sites is a Tumblr called "Bad Kids Jokes," and the two then proceeded to read some of Colbert's nonsensical favorites.

"There were three guys on a plane. One bit into an apple, thought it was too sweet, and threw it out the window. The second guy bit into a rock,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

London Stage Star and Olivier Henry V Leading Lady Asherson Dead at Age 99

'Henry V' Movie Actress Renée Asherson dead at 99: Laurence Olivier leading lady in acclaimed 1944 film (image: Renée Asherson and Laurence Olivier in 'Henry V') Renée Asherson, a British stage actress featured in London productions of A Streetcar Named Desire and Three Sisters, but best known internationally as Laurence Olivier's leading lady in the 1944 film version of Henry V, died on October 30, 2014. Asherson was 99 years old. The exact cause of death hasn't been specified. She was born Dorothy Renée Ascherson (she would drop the "c" some time after becoming an actress) on May 19, 1915, in Kensington, London, to Jewish parents: businessman Charles Ascherson and his second wife, Dorothy Wiseman -- both of whom narrowly escaped spending their honeymoon aboard the Titanic. (Ascherson cancelled the voyage after suffering an attack of appendicitis.) According to Michael Coveney's The Guardian obit for the actress, Renée Asherson was "scantly
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Renée Asherson obituary

Versatile actor who combined grace with gravity in her many roles over 65 years

Renée Asherson, a vivacious and stylish actor, who has died aged 99, enjoyed a career on stage and screen spanning 65 years. She will be remembered as the French princess in Laurence Oliviers wartime propaganda film version of Henry V, pertly trimming her garden roses while rehearsing the English words for delicate body parts.

She had made her screen debut earlier the same year, playing a small role in Carol Reeds The Way Ahead (1944), Peter Ustinovs script (from Eric Amblers story) showing how an army officer (David Niven) organised a bunch of disparate conscripts into a plausible fighting unit. She followed that with another war-time adventure, this time with more love interest, Anthony Asquiths The Way to the Stars (1945), scripted by Terence Rattigan, in which she played John Millss girlfriend, with Michael Redgrave and Rosamund John as a more straightforwardly middle-class pair.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Tom Hiddleston Brings Loki Fans To Shakespeare

Tom Hiddleston Brings Loki Fans To Shakespeare
Beginning tonight, you can see Tom Hiddleston tackling Shakespearean sonnets in PBS' four-part miniseries The Hollow Crown, which assembles Richard II, Henry IV, Parts I & II, and Henry V into a single chronological narrative. But if you're a member of The Television Critics Association, you were gifted with an impromptu live performance at this summer's Press Tour when the actor continuously -- and miraculously -- recited sonnets off the top of his head to illustrate his points.

It was glorious.

Following his triumphant TCA debut, I caught up with Hiddleston where he elaborated on his Hollow Crown experience, revealed the underlying professional edict that guides all his acting choices and continued to quote Shakespeare, much to my elation.

ETonline: While you were on stage, I was struck by the passion with which you speak about this project. Would you struggle to promote a project you couldn't speak about that passionately?

Tom Hiddleston: Yes. I
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Criterion Collection: Richard III | Blu-ray Review

  • ioncinema
More than 500 years later, historians and archaeologists have unearthed, and then validated the skeleton remains of the two-year term King of England, and in the same token, the Criterion folks issue the crisp, restored Blu-ray edition of Laurence Olivier’s Richard III, his third feature as a director following 1944′s Henry V and 1948′s Hamlet. In 1957, the film earned him an Oscar nomination for Best Actor in a Leading Role. During the same year, the film won Golden Globe Award for Best English-Language Foreign Film.

The great Olivier is Richard the Duke of Gloucester, a man with an insatiable appetite for power. He often smiles but his heart is full of poison. Assisted by the corrupt Duke of Buckingham (Ralph Richardson, Doctor Zhivago), he plans to kill his brother George (John Gielgud, The Elephant Man) and two nephews, while winning the heart of the vulnerable The Lady Anne (Claire Bloom,
See full article at ioncinema »

Nosher Powell obituary

Heavyweight boxer, James Bond stuntman and bodyguard to Hollywood stars

The abiding memory that millions around the world will have of Nosher Powell, who has died aged 84, is of him fighting in vain to save his aeroplane after it had been attacked by a seagull in Those Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines (1965). Gert Fröbe may have been the German officer in charge of the plane but it was Powell who, as the stuntman and double, ended up in the water.

Powell's first appearance as a stuntman was in Laurence Olivier's Henry V (1944). He also had small roles in David Lean's Oliver Twist (1948) and Cosh Boy (1953), with Joan Collins. In 1952 he was a boxer in Emergency Call, in which he fought the former world champion Freddie Mills. Powell had a decent if not outstanding boxing career himself, reaching No 3 in the British heavyweight rankings.

George Frederick Bernard Powell was born in Camberwell,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Nosher Powell obituary

Heavyweight boxer, James Bond stuntman and bodyguard to Hollywood stars

The abiding memory that millions around the world will have of Nosher Powell, who has died aged 84, is of him fighting in vain to save his aeroplane after it had been attacked by a seagull in Those Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines (1965). Gert Fröbe may have been the German officer in charge of the plane but it was Powell who, as the stuntman and double, ended up in the water.

Powell's first appearance as a stuntman was in Laurence Olivier's Henry V (1944). He also had small roles in David Lean's Oliver Twist (1948) and Cosh Boy (1953), with Joan Collins. In 1952 he was a boxer in Emergency Call, in which he fought the former world champion Freddie Mills. Powell had a decent if not outstanding boxing career himself, reaching No 3 in the British heavyweight rankings.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Basil Coleman obituary

Theatre, opera and television director who worked closely with Benjamin Britten

The theatre, opera and television director Basil Coleman, who has died aged 96, was a prolific and determined populariser of classic works. His acclaimed 10-part television adaptation of Anna Karenina (1977) starred Nicola Pagett and Eric Porter. For the BBC Shakespeare series he directed As You Like It (1978), with Helen Mirren: it was filmed at Glamis Castle and in the surrounding Scottish countryside, one of only two of the BBC Shakespeare series plays shot entirely on location.

His long association and friendship with Benjamin Britten began when the director Tyrone Guthrie made him assistant director on the composer's realisation of The Beggar's Opera with the English Opera Group at the Arts theatre, Cambridge (1948). Coleman then directed the first production of Britten's work for children Let's Make an Opera (1949), at Aldeburgh. Further premieres included the huge challenge of Billy Budd (1951) at the Royal Opera House,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Brooks Back for 'Nemo 2', More 'Twilight' Fan Fiction Set for Big Screen and a List of Kubrick's Favorite Films

1.) Albert Brooks is returning to voice Nemo's father, Marlin, in Finding Nemo 2. Ellen DeGeneres is also expected to return as the forgetful Dory with Andrew Stanton set to direct. At this point there are no plot details, though a 2016 release date is expected. Deadline 2.) Safe House director Daniel Espinosa is attached to direct an adaptation of John Grisham's "The Racketeer" for Fox and New Regency. The book sees a federal judge murdered at a lakeside cabin and the contents of his safe emptied. The only man who knows the whos and whys is a former attorney serving time in federal prison who hopes to parlay that into getting revenge on the people who put him there. THR 3.) More Twilight fan fiction is targeting a big screen adaptation while Universal tries to figure out what they're going to do with Fifty Shades of Grey. Constantin Film has acquired movie
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Laurence Olivier's Macbeth film project rises from the dead 50 years on

English lecturer stumbles across 'nonexistent' screenplay in British Library for film scuppered by financial problems

For more than 50 years it has been one of the great questions of British cinema: what would the celebrated actor and director Laurence Olivier have done with Shakespeare's Macbeth if he had managed to make a big-screen version?

Olivier, who was bitterly disappointed when his attempt to film the play was scuppered by financial problems, tried to shroud the project in mystery during his lifetime, saying there were no surviving copies of his screenplay and teasing fans and critics that nobody would ever have any idea how his version would have compared with those of Orson Welles or Roman Polanski.

But now an academic searching for something quite different has stumbled upon 13 versions of the lost screenplay among papers and discovered that Olivier had some surprises in store.

For example, Olivier and his then wife
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Master Of The World – The DVD Review

The 1961 fantasy adventure Master Of The World starring Vincent Price and Charles Bronson is finally available on DVD as part of MGM’s ‘Limited Edition Collection’. Though not considered to be a great film, it’s one I’ve always had a soft spot in my heart for, mostly because of the cast (those are my two favorite actors) and its frequent television airings decades ago. I’ve been showing an 8-minute cut on Super-8 sound film of Master Of The World at my Super-8 Vincent Price Movie Madness show that I’ve presented several times promoting Vincentennial and younger audiences seemed to really enjoy discovering this film even in the abridged version. Master Of The World was produced by American International to not only create their first prestigious epic color adventure but to cash in on the wave of adaptions of Jules Verne novels that were so successful at the time.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

A life in music: Richard Rodney Bennett

'I didn't ever decide I was going to be a composer. It was like being tall. It's what I was. It's what I did'

Sidney Lumet's 1974 film version of Agatha Christie's Murder on the Orient Express was something of a landmark in crime cinema. The star-studded cast (Bacall, Bergman, Connery, Finney, Gielgud, Redgrave . . .) and lavish production values provided both the template for later movie adaptations of Christie's work and paved the way for the successful trend of high-end television crime series. Richard Rodney Bennett, who had been writing for the screen since he was 18, and who was a technically brilliant classical composer with a deep knowledge of 1930s popular music, was an ideal choice to write the score.

"Stephen Sondheim recommended me," recalls Bennett. "And as soon as I saw the rushes I told Sidney that no one in their right mind was going to be scared out their wits by Agatha Christie.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Dcc 2011: Leonard Nimoy Divulges Vulcan Secrets And Takes A Walk Down Memory Lane

  • ScifiMafia
Over ten thousand people attended this past weekend’s Dallas Comic-Con. Arguably one of the biggest draws was the appearance of Spock himself, Leonard Nimoy. And he didn’t just merely come to sign autographs and take pictures with fans. Nimoy had prepared a special presentation for Dcc attendees… well, the lucky ones that got into the Main Stage Ballroom, that is!

As Dcc was one of the last conventions Nimoy planned to attend, he put together a retrospective presentation. He decided to do this in lieu of a traditional Q&A session and I must say that it was most fascinating to hear Nimoy lead us down his own memory lane and give us insight into his life as an actor, photographer, and as Spock.

But before the journey back in time began, Nimoy took care of business with addressing a few questions he knew many wanted an answer
See full article at ScifiMafia »

CriterionCast – Episode 072 – Laurence Olivier’s Henry V with Special Guest: Elisabeth Rappe of Chud.com and Film.com [Criterion Collection #041]

Special Guest: Elisabeth Rappe – A writer for Chud.com and Film.com.

This is the podcast dedicated to The Criterion Collection. Rudie Obias, Ryan Gallagher, & James McCormick discuss Criterion News & Rumors and Criterion New Releases, they also analyze, discuss & highlight Cc #041 Laurence Olivier’s 1944 film, Henry V.

What do you think of their show? Please send them your feed back: CriterionCast@gmail.com or call their voicemail line @ 347.878.3430 or follow them on twitter @CriterionCast or Comment on their blog, http://CriterionCast.com.

Thank You for listening. Don’t forget to subscribe to their podcast and please leave your reviews in their iTunes feed.

They broadcast every episode Live on UStream every Friday @ 8pm Est/5pm Pst. Join in on the conversation @ CriterionCast.com/Live

Our next episode they will highlight and discuss film Criterion #507 Nicholas Ray’s 1956 film, Bigger Than Life.

Add It To Your Netflix Queue.

Show Notes:

(00:
See full article at CriterionCast »

CriterionCast – Episode 071.5 – Disc 2 – Netflix Streaming Vs. Hulu Plus

Disc 2 episodes are bonus/supplement episodes of The CriterionCast. Rudie Obias, Ryan Gallagher, & James McCormick ramble on and on about movies and movie experiences. “On The Screen” is where they discuss anything and everything that has been on their screens in the week. So anything from TV & movies to music & web junk, everything “On The Screen” is up for grabs. This is what they recommend to you, their listeners.

What do you think of their show? Please send them your feed back: CriterionCast@gmail.com or call their voicemail line @ 347.878.3430 or follow them on twitter @CriterionCast or Comment on their blog, http://CriterionCast.com.

Thank You for listening. Don’t forget to subscribe to their podcast and please leave your reviews in their iTunes feed.

They broadcast every episode Live on UStream every Friday @ 8pm Est/5pm Pst. Join in on the conversation @ CriterionCast.com/Live

Our next episode they
See full article at CriterionCast »
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