Fibber McGee and Molly innocently get mixed up with the federal government.

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(screenplay), (story) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Jim Jordan ...
Marian Jordan ...
...
Senator Bigbee
Gordon Oliver ...
Dick Martin
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Mr. Popham
...
Angie
...
Dr. George Gallup (as Don Douglas)
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Ettie Clark
...
Tower, the Butler
The King's Men ...
Soldier Quartet
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Storyline

In this joke-filled spinoff of the Fibber McGee and Molly radio show, the couple leave Wistful Vista for Washington D.C. to visit cousin Alvin; neighborhood gossip magnifies the trip into a mission to advise the government. Once there, Fibber innocently starts things, including a big ruckus in the Senate. Will he be famous or infamous? Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

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Comedy

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Release Date:

20 October 1944 (USA)  »

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(RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

"The Screen Guild Theater" broadcast a 30 minute radio adaptation of the movie on February 10, 1947 with 'Fibber McGee & Molly' reprising their film roles. See more »

Quotes

Fibber McGee: That guy tosses eight cent stamps around like they were made of paper.
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Soundtracks

PLEASE WON'T YOU LEAVE MY GIRL ALONE
Music by Jimmy McHugh
Lyrics by Frank Loesser
Sung by The King's Men (soldier quartet)
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User Reviews

 
War Propaganda
2 July 2013 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

During World War 2, one "Fibber McGee & Molly" radio program every month, was devoted to some topic pertaining to the war effort, like rationing, or war bonds. "Heavenly Days" was the McGee's third feature film, and while the first two had been done entirely for entertainment, this one was devoted to spreading messages about the war effort.

It wasn't a very funny film, and not because of the message either -- their radio shows were always very funny, whatever message they were trying to convey. I believe this movie suffers the most due to the fact that the McGee's regular writer, Don Quinn, had nothing to do with the screenplay. Don Quinn had as much to do with the success of "Fibber McGee & Molly" as did Marion and Jim Jordon, and the film suffers from his absence.

Marion and Jim Jordon are incredibly appealing in this -- as they usually were, no matter in what venue they appeared -- however they script is very weak, full of ham-fisted attempts at patriotism and sentiment, that really fall short. In addition to this, the plot does not make very much sense.

The film should get should some kudos, though, for including a part for George Gallup (the creator of the Gallup Poll, played here by Donald Douglas). Ah, for the days when a statistician could become a celebrity.


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