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10 user 3 critic

Go Down, Death! (1945)

The owner of a juke joint arranges to frame an innocent preacher with a scandalous photograph, but his scheme backfires when his own adoptive mother interferes.

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(screenplay), (story idea) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Credited cast:
...
Eddye L. Houston
Spencer Williams ...
Big Jim Bottoms
Amos Droughan
Walter McMillion
Irene Campbell
Charlie Washington
Helen Butler
Dolly Jones
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Jimmie Green
The Heavenly Choir
Jimmie Green's Orchestra
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Storyline

A bar owner attempts to discredit the new preacher with whom he is feuding by framing him with a photograph showing him drinking with women with bad reputations. The bar owner's adoptive mother, a member of the minister's church, supports the preacher and gets the photographic prints. When the bar owner struggles with his mother for the prints, he accidentally kills her. After the preacher's funeral sermon, the bar owner's conscience drives him to his death. Written by Gary Imhoff, gary@dcwatch.com

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"The Wages of Sin is Death and as Ye Sow, so Shall Ye Reap"... Sayeth the Scriptures! See more »

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Drama

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23 March 1945 (USA)  »

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Did You Know?

Trivia

This film was the third in a trilogy of religious films directed by noted African-American filmmaker Spencer Williams. He previously directed The Blood of Jesus (1941) and the now-lost Brother Martin (1942). See more »

Connections

Referenced in Keepers of the Frame (1999) See more »

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User Reviews

Strange, with the last 5 minutes truly over the top
27 August 2002 | by See all my reviews

Very inexpensive movie made by Spencer Williams of Amos and Andy. Entirely post-dubbed, superficially moralistic, with Williams portraying a preacher who is mobbed by female parishoners. The last five minutes feature the villain's surrealistic trip to hell that smacks of Dali, Ed Wood, Catholic iconography and other medieval influences. Unforgettably weird.


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