Double Indemnity
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1-20 of 35 items from 2010   « Prev | Next »


MovieRetriever's 100 Greatest Movies: #52 Double Indemnity

13 December 2010 9:52 AM, PST | CinemaNerdz | See recent CinemaNerdz news »

Dec 13, 2010

Although James M. Cain's memorable novel of crime and passion, The Postman Always Rings Twice, predated his equally potent, similarly themed Double Indemnity by almost a decade, it is Indemnity that has proven the more influential, due largely to the uncompromising and suspenseful film writer-director Billy Wilder made from it. Wilder's film remains the model for just about every film noir of this type (Born to Kill, The Prowler, The Pushover, Body Heat, et al.) to come our way since.

Cain's novel was translated to the screen with the full force of the author's ...Read more at MovieRetriever.com »

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Lights, cameras, olfaction: scratch and sniff movies

8 December 2010 2:00 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Leonie Cooper sits in on an event that finds the perfect aroma for a film. So how would Brokeback Mountain smell?

It's a rainy Tuesday night, and I'm in a basement club in London wafting a perfume-impregnated cardboard stick under my nose. It smells good. I can detect a delicate floral note. But then I pick up the distinct aroma of cigarettes.

The perfume is Jasmin et Cigarettes, a tobacco-infused scent made by Etat Libre d'Orange. This French company's range of unconventional scents includes Like This, composed of pumpkin, yellow mandarin and neroli; it was inspired by Tilda Swinton, apparently. Another goes by the unenticing name of Fat Electrician. Jasmin et Cigarettes, I'm told, should conjure up images of a 1930s starlet skulking around a film set.

This is Scratch and Sniff, a series of events aimed at enhancing our understanding of the arts through smell. Each month, a group »

- Leonie Cooper

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The Pulp addiction: Top 10 noir novel adaptations

4 December 2010 4:04 AM, PST | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

What springs to mind when you hear the term noir? A deserted cobbled street blanketed by silver fog, a male silhouette lounging by a dimly lit lamp post or the mewing of a mangy cat through a dark alcove? For me, all these images conjure up the sinister voices of the pulp fiction forefathers like Raymond Chandler, James Cain or Dashiell Hammett. These were authors who wove plot patterns so dense they could make a rubix cube look like a postman pat jigsaw. Their detective protagonists were normally fast-talking hardmen scanning the streets with  gimlet eyes, their female leads weren’t just females-they were femme fatales.

But perhaps all you picture when you hear the term is that ungodly Mcvities creation lying alone in the biscuit tin-the dreaded Cafe Noir (they taste like a cake decoration you weren’t supposed to eat). If so then you are in the right place, »

- Katie McCabe

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Clip joint: fake noses

1 December 2010 5:54 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Prosthetic snouts have poked their beaks into numerous films. And the winners by a nose (or even a nasal hair) are ...

The nose knows. Slap bang in the middle of our faces sits something with which we can be identified with uncanny ease. So, when proboscises get altered, we're thrown off the scent. A shock conk confounds our perceptions and forces us to see a different person. That's why both Lawrence Olivier and Orson Welles liked fake beaks. The falsie Alec Guinness wore as Fagin in Oliver Twist (1948) copied Cruikshank's illustrations from the novel's first edition, but it also caused the film to be delayed, banned and edited. The temporary cinematic rhinoplasty packs powerful juju – and this is why nasal prostheses have poked on to the silver screen in over 50 roles in five basic categories.

1) Foremost, the phoney schnoz is thespian camouflage. Think Richard Attenborough in Seance on a Wet Afternoon, »

- Karen Krizanovich

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Neo-Noiriste: John Dahl

10 November 2010 11:18 AM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

By the time John Dahl had directed his third feature – 1994’s  The Last Seduction – critics had anointed him as a contemporary torch bearer – perhaps the lone, consistent one – of the film noir ethos.  Even today, with his filmography having grown to include the less noir-ish thrillers Unforgettable (1996) and Joy Ride (2001), a tale of card sharks prowling New York’s underground big-money poker circuit in Rounders (1998), and a true story of Ww II adventure and valor in The Great Raid (2005), Dahl’s name is still most closely associated with modern day noir thanks to the three indelible thrillers which launched his career:  Kill Me Again (1989), which he co-wrote with David W. Warfield, Red Rock West (1992), on which he collaborated with his brother Rick Dahl, and The Last Seduction, written by Steve Barancik.

Dahl’s working in movies represents a formidable leap from a less than cosmopolitan upbringing in Billings, Montana.  Although »

- Bill Mesce

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Scenes We Love: 'Kiss Kiss Bang Bang'

2 November 2010 3:02 PM, PDT | Cinematical | See recent Cinematical news »

Filed under: Cinematical

To put it simply, Shane Black's 'Kiss Kiss Bang Bang' is a hyper self-reflexive neo-noir meta comedy, a post-modern detective yarn for a generation more interested in referencing Raymond Chandler than actually reading him. Not merely the film that anticipated Robert Downey Jr.'s take on Tony Stark, 'Kiss Kiss Bang Bang' is also an epic parade of scenes we love where the good bits are great and the great bits are perfect. And even if it never ultimately coheres into a Movie We Love, it does feature Shannyn Sossamon in a pink wig, a lack of which (film scholars agree) is one of 'Double Indemnity's' most widely recognized flaws.

Continue Reading »

- David Ehrlich

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Scenes We Love: 'Kiss Kiss Bang Bang'

2 November 2010 3:02 PM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Filed under: Cinematical

To put it simply, Shane Black's 'Kiss Kiss Bang Bang' is a hyper self-reflexive neo-noir meta comedy, a post-modern detective yarn for a generation more interested in referencing Raymond Chandler than actually reading him. Not merely the film that anticipated Robert Downey Jr.'s take on Tony Stark, 'Kiss Kiss Bang Bang' is also an epic parade of scenes we love where the good bits are great and the great bits are perfect. And even if it never ultimately coheres into a Movie We Love, it does feature Shannyn Sossamon in a pink wig, a lack of which (film scholars agree) is one of 'Double Indemnity's' most widely recognized flaws.

Continue Reading »

- David Ehrlich

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Bringing Up Baby: The story of a scene

18 October 2010 3:38 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

1938 was a year of mistakes and misunderstandings. Many people believed in the Munich settlement, and the public thought Bringing Up Baby was stupid. The film lost around $300,000 and helped edge Katharine Hepburn closer to the category of "box-office poison". When you walk under the ladder of history, expect the whitewash to fall on you.

That's about the only mishap that doesn't hit Cary Grant's David Huxley as he bumps into Susan Vance (Hepburn). The sequence I want you to look at is the extended second meeting of this demented couple made in heaven (or is it hell?).

The encounter is an extraordinary sequence of physical comedy, one calamity adding to another until the finale where, in a crowed clubhouse of American sophisticates, David (in tatters) has to step so closely behind Susan to get away that he uses his top hat to mask the fact that her derriere is »

- David Thomson

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Double Indemnity: No 6

17 October 2010 3:50 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Billy Wilder, 1944

Cameron Crowe called Double Indemnity "flawless film-making". Woody Allen declared it "the greatest movie ever made". Even if you can't go along with that, there can be no disputing that it is the finest film noir of all time, though it was made in 1944, before the term film noir was even coined. Adapting James M Cain's 1935 novella about a straight-arrow insurance salesman tempted into murder by a duplicitous housewife, genre-hopping director Billy Wilder recruited Raymond Chandler as co-writer. Chandler, said Wilder, "was a mess, but he could write a beautiful sentence". Noir's visual style, which had its roots in German Expressionism, was forged here, though Wilder insisted that he was going for a "newsreel" effect. "We had to be realistic," he said. "You had to believe the situation and the characters, or all was lost." And we do. Fred MacMurray, who had specialised largely in comedy until that point, »

- Ryan Gilbey

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The Movies' Top Ten Greedy Bastards

29 September 2010 8:30 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

The Movies' Top Ten Greedy Bastards

Greed is the way of the world. It always has been. Art reflects humanity so it's no shock cinema obsesses over greed. It's the most primal of vices. It's the go-to, off-the-shelf trait for most villains. And it's a common one for flawed protagonists too. So with the release of Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps last week I felt it was time to point out the greediest of cinema's greedy bastards.

In order to narrow the focus, I chose greed-heads who desire material wealth. Otherwise, I'd have to consider every sex fiend, glutton, and vampire in movie history too. Obviously there were a few "juuust misses" such as Tuco from The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly, Goodfellas' Jimmy Conway, Hank and Sarah Marshall from A Simple Plan, and Aguirre: The Wrath of God's titular character. Ebenezer Scrooge was another character considered. Yet »

- David Frank

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[Nyff Masterworks] Masahiro Shinoda, From Gambling To God

23 September 2010 5:45 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

For over 40 years Japanese director Masahiro Shinoda both played within the confines of genre and sought to break from those same restrictions in exploring universal themes, such as faith and mortality. Shinoda’s 1964′s Pale Flower and 1971′s Silence, two of the Shinoda prints selected to play during the New York Film Festival, reflect this diversity on a rather epic scale. On one hand there’s Pale Flower, a black-and-white, well-paced, simply-told crime saga concerning a career criminal and the woman who wins his cold, cold heart. On the other is a sweeping tale of Catholicism and martyrdom, featuring landscapes and vibrant color – for at least some of the time.

Flower, while more successful as a narrative and more impressive on a technical level, lacks the personal passion present in Silence, which seems to be a reflection of Shinoda’s own conflicting beliefs. That said, both films feature principled protagonists who break their own rules. »

- Dan Mecca

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Trailer Watch: Kate Winslet as Mildred Pierce

19 September 2010 8:25 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

One of the great, satisfying page-turners is James M. Cain's 1941 Mildred Pierce, which was turned into an excellent 1945 movie starring Joan Crawford. (Several of Cain's hardboiled novels worked as films, including The Postman Always Rings Twice and Double Indemnity). Well, the Killer team of Christine Vachon and Todd Haynes have adapted the novel into a five-part HBO mini-series. The trailer ran before HBO's debut of Boardwalk Empire Sunday night. The new and original trailers are below. Hat Tip: Scott Macaulay. »

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In or Around New York City? Then You Can Experience The Return of William Castle!

26 August 2010 12:37 AM, PDT | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

If someone were to ask us to name our top ten directors of all time, the name William Castle would sit firmly somewhere within the top five. The man was not only a true showman but also an absolute genius. If we have one regret in our tenure here at Dread Central, it is that we weren't around during Castle's heyday of insane gimmicks. The man was without question the godfather of viral marketing, and it's taken the rest of the industry decades to catch up. If you live somewhere within the Tri-State Region, we have the info on an event that you do Not want to miss!

From the Press Release

The Return Of William Castle, a 15-film festival of horror and exploitation classics by the director and master showman, complete with their original gimmicks (Emergo!, Percepto!, Illusion-o!, and others – including one created exclusively for Film Forum), will run »

- Uncle Creepy

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Mother dearest

13 August 2010 4:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Movie mothers can be angels, saints, sirens, seductresses, psychopaths and monsters. But for John Patterson, there's only one that counts …

As Bong Joon-ho's Mother shows, some mothers will go to absurd lengths to protect their children, no matter how malformed, moronic or miscreant said issue may be. Hye-ja Kim's nameless single parent almost drives herself insane trying to prove her slow-witted son is innocent of murder, although it turns out that insanity may well have kicked in a long time before the story starts.

Not all movie mothers are this devoted. There's Carrie's mom, there's Mommie Dearest, there are inappropriately intimate, quasi-incestuous moms (Jessica Tandy in The Birds), and evil, manipulative and incestuous moms (Angela Lansbury in The Manchurian Candidate). Throw in monster moms (Throw Momma From The Train), sexualised older moms (The Mother), and dead-eyed, hateful moms (Precious), and you have quite the teeming oedipal bestiary to haunt your dreams. »

- John Patterson

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The 10 best movie cameos

24 July 2010 4:03 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

From Abba to Hitchcock, Philip French picks his favourite fleeting 'blink and you'll miss them' moments

Alfred Hitchcock (Rebecca, 1940)

Hitchcock, the brilliant self-publicist who probably devised his own sobriquet "Master of Suspense", virtually invented the movie cameo en route to becoming the world's most recognisable director. His first screen appearance was in a newsroom sequence in The Lodger (1926). Initially, the signature walk-ons were spasmodic, before becoming a feature of each picture after his move to the Us, beginning with Rebecca (1940), where he is seen outside a telephone kiosk being used by George Sanders. Each reflects wittily on the movie.

Walter Huston (The Maltese Falcon, 1941)

The great character actor Walter Huston appeared in son John's directorial debut as Captain Jacoby, the merchant mariner in league with Kasper Gutman and co. He staggers into Sam Spade's office clutching a parcel containing a replica of the eponymous statuette, "the stuff that dreams are made of" [sic]. He says, »

- Philip French

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Commentary: What's wrong with remakes?

13 July 2010 6:52 PM, PDT | The Bollywood Ticket | See recent The Bollywood Ticket news »

Hollywood is in the throes of remake fever. So far this year, we've seen the release of 'Clash of the Titans,' 'The A-Team,' 'The Karate Kid,' and 'Robin Hood.' Other remakes on deck or rumored to be in the works include 'Red Dawn,' 'Footloose,' 'Private Benjamin,' 'Conan the Barbarian,' 'Police Academy,' 'Romancing the Stone,' 'Slap Shot,' 'Arthur,' 'The Birds,' 'National Lampoon's Vacation,' 'Creature from the Black Lagoon,' and 'Total Recall.'

The American film industry is slated to release about 75 remakes in 2010, and while that number is unusually high, remakes are nothing new in Hollywood. Some are outstanding films—'Cape Fear' (1991), for example. And some are painfully bad—such as 'Planet of the Apes' (2001).

Moviegoers love to bemoan remakes—never as good as the original, »

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Rare Screenings Of Film Noir Classics July 11-12 Austin, Texas

9 July 2010 9:26 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

 

Cinema Retro received the following notice from the Alamo Ritz Theatre in Austin, Texas:

Cinema Club Presents Film Noir Expert Eddie Muller

Cinema Club is an ongoing series that presents an assortment of classic films with the added accompaniment of an audience discussion with a special guest expert at each screening. For two very special screenings in July we are proud to welcome author and film noir scholar Eddie Muller, whose books "Dark City: The Lost World Of Film Noir", "Dark City Dames" and "The Art Of Noir" have established him solidly at the top of his field. He even founded the Film Noir Foundation. Come find out more about this fascinating chapter of film history from the guy who knows where all the bodies are buried and which drawer the gun is in.

About The Prowler

"Originally appearing after Hollywood's noir wave had crested, The Prowler was largely dismissed »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Long Winded Link

22 June 2010 6:00 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Steve on Broadway Australian readers take note: The original cast of August: Osage County is heading to Sydney in August for one last go at the roles they've perfected over the years. Don't miss it.

The Cost of Going to the Movies This is an interesting chart on moviegoing vs. home theater costs. There's an agenda as this is a business site but it's still interesting. I find myself siding with stay home options so much lately from a moral perspective which is so sad because I think the in theater experience is so magical. But like Broadway and the music industry, corporations are all too willing to gouge their audiences price-wise until the audience dwindles. Nobody ever thinks longterm.

Serious Film treats the IMDb Top 250 list very seriously indeed. This rundown has a lot of interesting anecdotes but I just can't stomach looking at it (the list, not this »

- NATHANIEL R

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Barbara Stanwyck, Fred MacMurray, Edward G. Robinson: Double Indemnity Academy Screening

1 June 2010 3:28 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Double Indemnity (1944), Billy Wilder’s quintessential film noir starring Barbara Stanwyck, Fred MacMurray (right), and Edward G. Robinson, will be screened as the next feature in the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ series “Oscar Noir: 1940s Writing Nominees from Hollywood’s Dark Side” on Monday, June 7, at 7:30 p.m. at the Academy’s Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills. Double Indemnity will be introduced by screenwriter Nicholas Meyer (Time after Time, The Human Stain). Wilder and co-screenwriter Raymond Chandler adapted James M. Cain’s novel about a housewife/femme fatale (Stanwyck) who gets her [...] »

- Andre Soares

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Double Indemnity

1 June 2010 3:22 AM, PDT | DearCinema.com | See recent DearCinema.com news »

Price: Rs 399.00 Shipping Time:  7 Days Shipping Region:  India Shipping Cost:  Rs. 35 Colour/B&W:  B/W Producer/Production House:  Buddy G. DeSylvaJoseph Sistrom Censor Certification:  V/U Dearcinema Recommends

Double Indemnity (1944) is an Academy Award nominated film noir starring Fred MacMurray, Barbara Stanwyck, and Edward G. Robinson. The movie was directed by Billy Wilder and adapted by Wilder and Raymond Chandler from the novella of the same title by James M. Cain that first appeared in 1935 as an abridged 8-part serial in Liberty Magazine.[1] The story was based on a 1927 crime perpetrated by a married Queens woman and her lover. Ruth (Brown) Snyder persuaded her boyfriend, Judd Gray, to kill her husband Albert after having her spouse take out a big insurance policy

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- NewsDesk

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