Double Indemnity
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12 items from 2009


The New Breed of Filmmakers: A Multiplication of Myths

16 December 2009 9:38 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

The difference between the two obsessive quests in The Searchers (1956) and French Connection II (1975) is one of quantity: Popeye Doyle’s one goal, revenging himself on the hedonistic narcotics king, Charnier, to hell with everything else! involves more staccato cuts, more bits of cheerful Mediterranean color, more focus changing, and, especially more mobility and paranoia in Hackman’s acting than occurs during the entirety of Ethan Edward’s (John Wayne) endless Monument Valley search for little white Debbie (Natalie Wood) who, unthinkable for a Wayne-Ford adobe epic, has been cohabiting rather sensibly with a Comanche chief named Scar.

Effulgence, luxuriance . . . the new Hollywood film multiplies everything, trying to get the mythic aspect as well as a very contemporaneous attitude about candidness, what does candidness mean as a way of life? Old studio works like Double Indemnity (1944) stick to one hard-boiled attitude about the Forties in the L.A. suburbs: the camera-lighting-acting-language is dry, »

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Interview: Robert Sean Leonard of Hugh Laurie’s ‘House M.D.’ on Self-Titled Episode ‘Wilson’

30 November 2009 11:44 AM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – Robert Sean Leonard, who plays Dr. James Wilson on “House M.D.” (and the best friend of Golden Globe winner Hugh Laurie as Dr. Gregory House), describes himself as less than ambitious with his career and even “lazy” in an interview with HollywoodChicago.com’s presence. He’s also remembered for his role on “Dead Poet’s Society”.

Tonight’s self-titled episode “Wilson,” which is episode nine of season six, puts Robert Sean Leonard more in the spotlight than fans are used to seeing him. The episode, which airs on Nov. 30, 2009 at 8 p.m. Et/Pt on Fox, is an intense examination into Wilson’s world when it’s not involving House.

House M.D.” stars Hugh Laurie, Robert Sean Leonard, Lisa Edelstein, Omar Epps, Jennifer Morrison, Jesse Spencer and Olivia Wilde from creator David Shore. Tonight’s episode synopsis follows and then the Robert Sean Leonard interview follows thereafter.

When »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Interview: 50 Years of Filmmaking With Martin Landau

2 November 2009 2:30 PM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – The legendary Martin Landau was recently in Chicago with two films in special presentation at The 45th Annual Chicago International Film Festival - the classic “North by Northwest,” also releasing on Blu-Ray tomorrow, November 3rd, 2009, and the new drama “Lovely, Still,” co-starring Ellen Burstyn.

Very few actors will ever have an experience like Mr. Landau did at the film festival in October, bringing two experiences from such different eras of their working life. We spent a lot of time with Martin discussing what’s important to him as an actor and he made clear that it’s the arc of his character that’s essential to the projects he chooses.

Landau explains, “The interesting thing is that I’ve had an interesting cross-section of directors - Joe Mankiewicz, George Stevens, Henry Hathaway, George Marshall, Tim Burton, Francis Coppola, Woody Allen, Steve Spielberg. The good directors create a playground for »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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The Noir Loser

26 October 2009 9:41 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The debut of a number of distinctive personalities is one of the important features of film noir.  Noir’s main character, for instance, may appropriately be labeled the noir loser.  He is a handsome, middle-aged man who seems to blur the line between protagonist and antagonist.  Billy Wilder has very explicitly introduced such personalities as Walter Neff in Double Indemnity and Joe Gillis in Sunset Boulevard and, as such, defined a key aspect of the genre.  Both are ordinary men who see an opportunity to advance their lives, albeit immorally, only to find themselves victims of fate at the hands of a female counterpart. In both films, the noir loser compels the audience to sympathize for them.  The films begin with a voice-over narration from both men at the culmination of their demise.  Double Indemnity’s Walter Neff introduces himself in the opening minutes as he confesses his crime: “I killed Dietrichson. »

- Daniel Elisevich

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A Glimpse into the Origins of Film Noir

18 October 2009 3:30 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

A term that translates to 'Black Film' already sounds interesting. Add to that dramatic, highly stylized cinematography and hard-hitting, gritty writing, and the appeal of film noir is clear. The term is mostly attributed to works such as Double Indemnity, Scarlet Street, and The Maltese Falcon, all major works which helped popularize the genre after its debut in the early 1940s. Film noir has its origins in literature, birthed in the middle of the 20th century when urban development and social unrest were creating a new world that demanded new literary styles. Coming into prominence at a time of expanding social consciousness in the context of urban life, authors such as Dashiell Hammett found a passion for writing in a 'hard-boiled,' street-smart manner.  Hammett's Two Sharp Knives is such a piece, with its stylized narrative, moody characters and dark setting, later to be enhanced in film by stark black and white imagery. »

- Daniel

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Old Ass Movies: Kill For the Money with ‘Double Indemnity’

6 September 2009 6:00 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Every week, Film School Rejects presents a movie that was made before you were born and tells you why you should like it. This week, Old Ass Movies presents: Double Indemnity (1944) Where's the love for Billy Wilder? In discussions about the greatest film directors of all time, you'll hear all the usual suspects - Coppola, Godard, Scorsese, Kurosawa, Spielberg - but I bet you most people will neglect to mention Wilder in their first ten responses, if they even mention him at all. That's a damn shame. If ever there was an underrated director who deserved lavish praise, it's Wilder. Spanning a career in which he was active as a writer for five decades and a director for almost four, the Polish-born filmmaker accumulated 6 Oscar wins and 21 nominations. That's more wins than Coppola (5), Spielberg (3), and Clint Eastwood (4) and more nominations than Coppola (14), Stanley Kubrick (13), Scorsese (8) and both Joel and Ethan Coen combined (16). But maybe accolades aren't your »

- Jim Rohner

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400 Screens, 400 Blows - Literary Devices

23 August 2009 7:02 AM, PDT | Cinematical | See recent Cinematical news »

Sam Mendes' Away We Go (54 screens) makes for a great trailer, consisting of all the very funny, snarky stuff written by Dave Eggers and Vendela Vida. The actual movie has some very funny moments as well, and some terrific individual scenes, but it doesn't add up to a reasonable whole, mainly because the ever-shifting tones never quite mesh. Nevertheless, it seems to be performing well in its arthouse capacity, surviving more on a well-executed stream of hype rather than on the quality of the movie itself. From the ads, you'd think it has already won an Oscar (and, because of this kind of subconscious suggestion, it still might). Either way, what this means is that a literary giant like Eggers didn't have to go slumming. His reputation is intact.

In the old days, great novelists would sometimes write for the movies, but it was sneered at and looked down upon. »

- Jeffrey M. Anderson

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Hooch ‘n’ Harmonies

26 June 2009 9:54 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Undertones: Volume 2 In the 1940s the consumption of alcohol was predominantly glamorised on the silver screen. Starlets sipped sensuously on their g & t’s whilst detectives downed shots of whiskey before departing the office on a hot lead. If this was an accurate portrayal of the time, one has to ask how the hell anyone got anything done whilst being so heavily sauced. Despite the era’s predilection for depicting alcohol ingestion as a sophisticated way to spend one’s time, a film emerged from this period that actually dared to show the repercussions of excess binges with the bottle; Billy Wilder’s Oscar winning film, The Lost Weekend (1945). Starring Ray Milland in the lead role as Don Birham, a recovering alcoholic writer, The Lost Weekend follows four chaotic days as Birham jumps back on the wagon. Apart from classic Wilder dialogue and beautiful cinematography that recalls that of the »

- Clare Nina Norelli

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"Jerichow" review - Petzold's suspenseful follow-up to last year's Yella.

13 May 2009 | Upcoming-Movies.com | See recent Upcoming-Movies.com news »

"Jerichow" review  By Steve Ramos, Writer   Cruel, cool 'Jerichow' is a suspense drama equal to a Raymond Chandler novel     Instead of the sprawling Los Angeles backdrop of "Double Indemnity,"  German filmmaker Christian Petzold sets his cool, cruel film noir in a sparsely populated, economically devastated region of Northeastern Germany near the North Sea. This may sound like an odd setting for a movie type deeply connected with urban settings but "Jerichow," named after a small German town in the area, has the rich characters, deeply-felt passions and climactic surprises equal to anything from a Raymond Chandler or James M. Cain novel.   Opening in NY Friday, Jerichow, Petzold's suspenseful follow-up to last year's Yella, will expand to select U.S. cities throughout the summer. "Jerichow' may lack the profile of the numerous Hollywood blockbusters flooding theaters but it's hard to imagine a better thriller this summer.   Much of »

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"Jerichow" review - Petzold's suspenseful follow-up to last year's "Yella."

13 May 2009 12:32 AM, PDT | Upcoming-Movies.com | See recent Upcoming-Movies.com news »

Cruel, cool 'Jerichow' is a suspense drama equal to a Raymond Chandler novel Instead of the sprawling Los Angeles backdrop of "Double Indemnity," German filmmaker Christian Petzold sets his cool, cruel film noir in a sparsely populated, economically devastated region of Northeastern Germany near the North Sea. This may sound like an odd setting for a movie type deeply connected with urban settings but "Jerichow," named after a small German town in the area, has the rich characters, deeply-felt passions and climactic surprises equal to anything from a Raymond Chandler or James M. Cain novel. Opening in NY Friday, Jerichow, Petzold's suspenseful follow-up to last year's Yella, will expand to select U.S. cities throughout the summer. "Jerichow' may lack the profile of the numerous Hollywood blockbusters flooding theaters but it's hard to imagine a better thriller this summer. »

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"Jerichow" review - Petzold's suspenseful follow-up to last year's Yella.

13 May 2009 12:32 AM, PDT | Upcoming-Movies.com | See recent Upcoming-Movies.com news »

Cruel, cool 'Jerichow' is a suspense drama equal to a Raymond Chandler novel Instead of the sprawling Los Angeles backdrop of "Double Indemnity," German filmmaker Christian Petzold sets his cool, cruel film noir in a sparsely populated, economically devastated region of Northeastern Germany near the North Sea. This may sound like an odd setting for a movie type deeply connected with urban settings but "Jerichow," named after a small German town in the area, has the rich characters, deeply-felt passions and climactic surprises equal to anything from a Raymond Chandler or James M. Cain novel. Opening in NY Friday, Jerichow, Petzold's suspenseful follow-up to last year's Yella, will expand to select U.S. cities throughout the summer. "Jerichow' may lack the profile of the numerous Hollywood blockbusters flooding theaters but it's hard to imagine a better thriller this summer. »

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The Ultimate Guide to TCM's 31 Days of Oscar Begins Here

31 January 2009 5:56 PM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

From this Sunday, February 1 through Tuesday, March 3 Turner Classic Movies (TCM) begins their annual 31 Days of Oscar, which brings you night after night of Oscar winning and nominated films uncut and commercial free on TCM and I have put together for you a mini guide for films to look for each day so you can either sit down and enjoy them as they play or set your DVR to record them for later. Either way, this is a great way to knock off so many of those classic films from your must see list. First, how about the TCM video montage preview. Can you name the films?

Now, for the full schedule you can click here to download the Pdf or you can browse TCM's online calendar at the 31 Days of Oscar official site. Because one thing is for sure, even though I list films for every single day below »

- Brad Brevet

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005

12 items from 2009


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