6.9/10
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5 user 1 critic

Victory Vehicles (1943)

To combat the wartime shortages in gas and tires, a number of fanciful forms of transportation are demonstrated by various versions of Goofy. Finally, we see the ultimate solution: the pogo stick.

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Cast

Credited cast:
George Johnson ...
Goofy (voice)
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Storyline

With a war going on and tires and gasoline needing to be rationed, the man's automobile is not much use these days. So other forms of transportation are needed, each one suggested by an average United States denizen (each one, a Goofy like-alike). Some of these include a dog-powered vehicle, a cycle consisting of various feet which does your walking for you while you sit, children's vehicles which combine play with transportation, a golfer's "Model Tee" which you can use to "drive" to work (with a golf club), a politician's "pump-mobile", and a pair of roller skates operated by a handy magnet. But the most important vehicle during this time is... the pogo stick. The pogo's many uses are demonstrated and, pretty soon, the pogo will ultimately become the most popular transportation mode (though, obviously, since then, it hasn't!). Written by Matt Yorston (george.y@ns.sympatico.ca)

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Approved | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

30 July 1943 (USA)  »

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(RCA Sound System)

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The newspaper article to the right of Goofy's picture has the heading "'Tires not necessary to Human Life,' says Prof. Da Gradi." This alludes to Don DaGradi, who was a layout artist for Walt Disney's staff. See more »

Connections

Featured in Nostalgia Critic: Leprechaun (2010) See more »

Soundtracks

Hop on Your Pogo Stick
(uncredited)
Music by Oliver Wallace
Lyrics by Ned Washington
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User Reviews

 
Wartime Chuckles With Goofy
29 January 2003 | by (Forest Ranch, CA) – See all my reviews

A Walt Disney GOOFY Cartoon.

Various bizarre & unusual VISTORY VEHICLES are demonstrated by Goofy as possible ways to provide locomotion despite the wartime rubber shortage.

This very humorous little film pokes gentle fun at the serious transportation problem faced on the World War Two American Home Front due to the rationing of rubber. The Disney animators obviously had much fun coming up with the highly imaginative vehicles. Pluto makes a cameo appearance as the method of propulsion for a dogcart. The sprightly tune "Hop On Your Pogo Stick" deserves to be revived by the Disney folks.

Walt Disney (1901-1966) was always intrigued by drawings. As a lad in Marceline, Missouri, he sketched farm animals on scraps of paper; later, as an ambulance driver in France during the First World War, he drew figures on the sides of his vehicle. Back in Kansas City, along with artist Ub Iwerks, Walt developed a primitive animation studio that provided animated commercials and tiny cartoons for the local movie theaters. Always the innovator, his ALICE IN CARTOONLAND series broke ground in placing a live figure in a cartoon universe. Business reversals sent Disney & Iwerks to Hollywood in 1923, where Walt's older brother Roy became his lifelong business manager & counselor. When a mildly successful series with Oswald The Lucky Rabbit was snatched away by the distributor, the character of Mickey Mouse sprung into Walt's imagination, ensuring Disney's immortality. The happy arrival of sound technology made Mickey's screen debut, STEAMBOAT WILLIE (1928), a tremendous audience success with its use of synchronized music. The SILLY SYMPHONIES soon appeared, and Walt's growing crew of marvelously talented animators were quickly conquering new territory with full color, illusions of depth and radical advancements in personality development, an arena in which Walt's genius was unbeatable. Mickey's feisty, naughty behavior had captured millions of fans, but he was soon to be joined by other animated companions: temperamental Donald Duck, intellectually-challenged Goofy and energetic Pluto. All this was in preparation for Walt's grandest dream - feature length animated films. Against a blizzard of doomsayers, Walt persevered and over the next decades delighted children of all ages with the adventures of Snow White, Pinocchio, Dumbo, Bambi & Peter Pan. Walt never forgot that his fortunes were all started by a mouse, or that simplicity of message and lots of hard work will always pay off.


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