6.8/10
675
13 user 8 critic

Victory Through Air Power (1943)

An animated documentary promoting of the soundness of strategic aerial bombing in World War II.

Writers:

(book) (as Maj. Alexander P. Seversky), (story direction) | 5 more credits »
Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 1 win. See more awards »
Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Alexander de Seversky ...
Himself (as Major Alexander P. de Seversky)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
...
Narrator (voice)
Billy Mitchell ...
Himself (archive footage)
Edit

Storyline

This is a unique film in Disney Production's history. This film is essentially a propaganda film selling Major Alexander de Seversky's theories about the practical uses of long range strategic bombing. Using a combination of animation humorously telling about the development of air warfare, the film switches to the Major illustrating his ideas could win the war for the allies. Written by Kenneth Chisholm <kchishol@execulink.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

There's a Thrill in the Air!


Certificate:

See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

17 July 1943 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Vitória Pela Força Aérea  »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$788,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$799,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

All of Alexander de Seversky's live-action monologue sequences were filmed on the Disney backlot late at night to avoid noise pollution from the nearby Lockheed aircraft factory. See more »

Goofs

The film claims the German's used air power to break through the Maginot line to conquer France. In reality, the German forces avoided directly engaging the Line and instead completely circumvented it. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Billy Mitchell: Today, a war is very different than the last European war was. Now air power is the dominant feature of military operations. Air power can fly directly to the vital centers of an opposing state and neutralize them. It can destroy the cities, it can wreck the aqueducts, it can knock out the lines of communication, it can destroy the food supplies, and make the people helpless to resist.
See more »

Connections

Featured in The Disney Family Album: Marc Davis (1985) See more »

Soundtracks

William Tell Overture
(uncredited)
Music by Gioachino Rossini
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

A Product of Its Time
12 May 2008 | by See all my reviews

Disney like most other Americans in the early 1940s wanted to find some way to contribute to the war effort short of actually fighting. This film - along with the other wartime shorts on the DVD that contains it - stems from that impulse.

On one level, the film is meant to educate general audience in the scenarios of the history of flight, aerial combat and the (then) global crisis regarding the Allies vs. the Axis powers.

It does its job, entertaining when possible, affirming destruction and American/Allied dominance at critical points.

During my most recent viewing of it, I found that it almost seemed to make the case for nuclear warfare. Not outright, mind you, but through its continued emphasis of how Allied airstrikes, because of their remote points of origin, can/could not possibly inflict enough damage to Axis supply lines to shut them down. The film and its military authority Major Seversky propose that long range bombers are the answer - after which a presumably innovative animated version of just such a long range bomber is shown on screen: its long, clumsy-looking, with several large gunwales pointing out all over the plane's body. After seeing that, i could only surmise that military officials of the 1940s saw the folly in trying to build bigger and better airships to do in the Axis. Instead, per the film's rhetoric, the more logical solution seems/seemed to be: "Forget about trying to send a volley of superplanes; instead, send only one plane - but design its cargo to deliver Armageddon!"


4 of 4 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?
Review this title | See all 13 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

'Star Wars' Creatures We Love

"The IMDb Show" breaks down the origins of some iconic Star Wars creatures. Plus, legendary sword choreographer Tim Weske explains the basics of lightsaber combat.

Watch now