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Titanic
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Titanic (1943) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

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Release Date:
12 December 1943 (Finland) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
The story of the sinking of the British luxury liner Titanic in 1912. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
User Reviews:
PROPAGANDA-EFFECTIVE DRAMA See more (36 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)
Sybille Schmitz ... Sigrid Olinsky
Hans Nielsen ... 1st Officer Petersen
Kirsten Heiberg ... Gloria
Ernst Fritz Fürbringer ... Sir Bruce Ismay (as E.F. Fürbringer)
Karl Schönböck ... John Jacob Astor
Charlotte Thiele ... Lady Astor
Otto Wernicke ... Captain Edward J. Smith
Franz Schafheitlin ... Hunderson
Sepp Rist ... Jan
Claude Farell ... Manniküre Hedi (as Monika Burg)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Jolly Bohnert ... Marcia (uncredited)
Hermann Brix ... Kapellmeister Gruber (uncredited)
Fritz Böttger ... Lord Douglas (uncredited)
Karl Dannemann ... 1. Funker Philipps (uncredited)
Kurt Alexander Duma ... 2. Ingenieur Hesketh (uncredited)
Peter Elsholtz ... Landarbeiter Bobby (uncredited)
Karl Fochler ... Obersteward (uncredited)
Fritz Genschow ... Landarbeiter Henry (uncredited)
Herbert Gernot ... Schiffsdetektiv (uncredited)
Susi Jera ... Kind (uncredited)
Josef Kamper ... 1. Ingenieur Romain (uncredited)
Lieselott Klingler ... Anne (uncredited)
W.P. Krüger ... (uncredited)
Hans Leibelt ... (uncredited)
Theodor Loos ... Geheimrat Bergmann (uncredited)
Karl Meixner ... Lord Astors 1. Sekretär Hopkins (uncredited)
Edgar Pauly ... (uncredited)
Werner Scharf ... Südländer Mendoz (uncredited)
Just Scheu ... Dr. Lorenzen (uncredited)
Georg H. Schnell ... Aktionär Morrison (uncredited)
Hans Schwarz Jr. ... Athletischer Kerl (uncredited)
Theo Shall ... 1st Officer Murdoch (uncredited)
Ernst Stahl-Nachbaur ... Oberrichter (uncredited)
Walter Steinbeck ... Aktionär Fränklin (uncredited)
Walter Steinweg ... Bootsmann (uncredited)
Erich Stelmecke ... (uncredited)
Herbert Tiede ... 2nd Officer Lightoller (uncredited)
Charlotte Tiedemann ... Frau mit Kind (uncredited)
Toni von Bukovics ... Herzogin (uncredited)
Peter Voß ... Schiffsarzt (uncredited)
Heinz Welzel ... 2. Funker Bride (uncredited)

Directed by
Herbert Selpin 
Werner Klingler (uncredited)
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Harald Bratt  story (uncredited)
Hansi Köck  script (uncredited)
Herbert Selpin  writer
Walter Zerlett-Olfenius 

Original Music by
Werner Eisbrenner 
 
Cinematography by
Friedl Behn-Grund 
 
Film Editing by
Friedel Buckow 
 
Production Design by
Robert A. Dietrich 
August Herrmann 
Fritz Lück 
Fritz Maurischat 
 
Set Decoration by
Robert A. Dietrich (uncredited)
August Herrmann (uncredited)
Fritz Lück (uncredited)
 
Costume Design by
Max von Formacher (uncredited)
 
Production Management
Willy Reiber .... production manager
Fritz Schwarz .... unit manager
 
Sound Department
Adolf Jansen .... sound (uncredited)
 
Visual Effects by
Ernst Kunstmann .... visual effects (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Karl Ewald .... still photographer (uncredited)
 

Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
85 min | Germany:80 min (censored version)
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono | Mono (Tobis-Klangfilm)
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The sinking scenes were filmed on board the former luxury liner Cap Arcona. This boat was used in 1945 to evacuate thousands of prisoners of the concentration camp Neuengamme (near Hamburg) to Denmark. The Cap Arcona was accidentally bombed by Allied forces in the bay of Luebeck. Only a few prisoners survived the sinking of the ship. Most were killed on board or shot by SS guards and Hitler Youth, who took position on the beach not far from the sinking ship. But the evacuation turned out to be a ruse. The Nazis secretly ordered all prisoners to be killed and the ship was laden with explosives so everyone would perish when the ship was hit by an Allied bomb.See more »
Goofs:
Factual errors: In a scene from the morning of April 14 (as established by a shot of a day calendar) one telegraph officer says to the other that the ship will be arriving in New York tomorrow, i.e. April 15. The Titanic wasn't due in New York until April 17.See more »
Quotes:
1st Officer Murdoch:What wheater! It it stays calm, we'll be in New York at least a day ahead of schedule.
1st Officer Petersen:Meanwhile the engines are ruined.
1st Officer Murdoch:President Ismay surely knows what he's doing, ordering this speed.
[to the side]
1st Officer Murdoch:Sailor.
1st Officer Petersen:Who's running this ship? Ismay or the captain?
1st Officer Murdoch:The Captian naturally does what the president of the line requests.
1st Officer Petersen:And why does he request such rubbish?
See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in The Nazi Titanic (2012) (TV)See more »
Soundtrack:
Nearer My God To TheeSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
31 out of 37 people found the following review useful.
PROPAGANDA-EFFECTIVE DRAMA, 18 June 1999
Author: jan onderwater from Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Most articles on this film tend to overlook the intrinsic qualities of the film as film, though of course these are connected with the propaganda aspect. The opening scenes (the board meeting and subsequent meeting) are strong and the key to the propaganda: in a very short time it is effectively made clear what the point of view of this film is and what follows is an entertaining and propaganda-effective film. From the moment we are on the ship until the collision the film is drama routine, but one of the better sort. Really exiting is the film from collision till sinking, i.e. when the real drama emerges and the splendid special effects do their jobs; not one aspect of the outlined drama is forgotten, it is fast-paced and very well directed.

Of the cast it is Sybille Schmitz who excels, while other members also do a very good job; they must have done so otherwise the whole propaganda aspect would not have come across. There is one exception here: it seems that Hans Neilsen (playing the German officer) is very good, but he is not. It is often said that he speaks his lines as a Wehrmacht officer on duty, but for me his machine gun like delivered lines sound more like the staccato of the regular commentator of the Deutsche Wochenschau (compare this, when you have the possibility).

Though this film is obviously anti-British, it is rather anti English capitalist establishment and their decadence than anti-British per se *; an anti-capitalism not so much based on (to generalize) theoretical arguments, but (as most of fascist ideas) on the petty bourgeois middle class mentality and jealousy towards others who are better off. The crux for this is in the strong opening: it is here when Ismay remarks that he cannot take into account the interests of the small investors, they must bend to his need and of course greed. As such the focus of the propaganda is established; on the ship we meet very wealthy people playing with money (e.g. the gamblers) and people preferring money above people (Lord Astor, well played by Schönbock), these being decorum for the propaganda and an elaboration of the already established focus. Money (large sums bidden for almost everything) plays the major part in this film (it should have received first credit). Lord Astor even worries about stolen jewelry while the ship is sinking: money makes decadent. Compare for instance the cynic way of life upper deck and the more natural and spontaneous life lower deck.

[* Noteworthy is that after its re-release in 1950 it was quickly banned again in the Western zones, while in the Soviet zone it was screened without a problem; the anti-capitalism might have done the trick.]

The pro-German aspect and the answer to everything is German officer Petersen. He not almost single handedly saves a part of the passengers, he also shows the right spirit when it comes to human feelings. Only when the Baltic countess says she has no money anymore, he gives room for his feelings towards her; what a fine chap, he is! And it is from that point on that she does her duty as a human being and starts helping out with the rescue: money makes cynic.

There is also a hint of Durchhaltefilm here. Take for instance that schematic and ideological German rural couple; not a couple of flesh and blood, they seem to have walked straight out of a Nazi rural painting. Men and women are separated for the rescue, but this couple stays together: in an almost religious shot they hold hands expressing that nothing can separate them. They are separated by force of the panic, but reconciled again in the end. No catastrophe can undermine the simple German life.

This Titanic has its influence on film history as well. It has been ripped off at least twice, first in 1958 for A Night to Remember (a story widely known) and recently by James Cameron who for his Titanic but boring endeavour stole quite some story ideas and complete scenes; check this when you have the opportunity.

It is often written that this film was not released in Germany cause of the death (suicide, murder?) of its first director Selpin. Wetzel & Hagemann in their survey of censorship in Nazi Germany (book, 1978) claim that this is not so. It had its unnoticed premiere in 1943 in unimportant cinemas, only to be banned in December 1944 for the well-known reason: the audience was not to be confronted with catastrophes.

Beware which version you see; as I understand it there are 2 versions. The longer one (the one I saw) includes a final scene in court; Petersen is the German J'accuse of Bruce Ismay, but there appears to be no British justice.

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