A jazz cartoon involving a "Fats Waller"-like cat who leaves the "Uncle Tomcat Mission" for the local jazz club.

Director:

(as Bob Clampett)

Writer:

(story)
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Cast

Uncredited cast:
...
Giant Lips / Rubber Band / Hitler / Cat (voice) (uncredited)
The Four Dreamers ...
Uncle Tom Cat Mission Singers (voice) (uncredited)
Four Spirits of Rhythm ...
Fats Waller Cat backing vocals (voice) (uncredited)
Zoot Watson ...
Fats Waller Cat (voice) (uncredited)
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Storyline

A fat cat (a caritcture of Fats Waller) is walking down the street scatting, when he comes upon a club called "The Kit-Kat Club". On the way in, he walks by a place called "Uncle Tomcat Mission", where a gospel singer warns him not to enter the club, and to beware of "wine, women, and song". The cat replies "Well, wats de motta wit dat?", and walks in the club. After playing some piano, he is blasted out of this world with a wild trumpet solo. He lands in a world similar to that in "Porky in Wackyland"(1938). Written by C. Walker

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Plot Keywords:

cat | jazz | trumpet | piano | visual pun | See All (27) »


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Details

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Release Date:

17 July 1943 (USA)  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

One of the "Censored 11" banned from T.V. syndication by United Artists in 1968 (then the owners of the Looney Tunes film library) for alleged racism. Ted Turner continued the ban when he was hired and stated that these films will not be re-issued and will not be put on Home Video. These cartoons will probably never air on television again, and only non-Warner Bros. licensed public domain video tapes will probably ever have these cartoons on them. See more »

Quotes

Fats Waller Cat [and others]: What's de MOTOR with him?
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Connections

Featured in Animation Lookback: Top 10 Controversial Cartoons (2015) See more »

Soundtracks

Nagasaki
(uncredited)
Music by Harry Warren
Lyrics by Mort Dixon
Sung by various characters
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Superb golden-age animation short!
11 March 2000 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

What marvelous things the animators once did! Seek this out ... great jazz music and Salvador Dali-esque monochrome background art. Brilliant! This inspired cartoon is from the age of pride in creative filmmaking, and as such it is most highly recommended to all. Adults and children alike will appreciate the masterful imageries to be seen and heard.


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