7.4/10
1,522
42 user 20 critic

Stormy Weather (1943)

Approved | | Musical | 17 November 1943 (Sweden)
The relationship between an aspiring dancer and a popular songstress provides a retrospective of the great African American entertainers of the early 1900s.

Director:

(as Andrew Stone)

Writers:

(screen play) (as Frederick Jackson), (screen play) | 3 more credits »
Reviews

Watch Now

From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
1 win. See more awards »
Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
Cab Calloway and His Cotton Club Orchestra ...
Cab Calloway Orchestra (as Cab Calloway and His Band)
Katherine Dunham and Her Troupe ...
...
The Nicholas Brothers ...
Dancers (as Nicholas Brothers)
...
...
Gabe Tucker
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
...
Katherine Dunham ...
Katherine Dunham
The Tramp Band ...
The Tramp Band
Edit

Storyline

Dancing great Bill 'Williamson' sees his face on the cover of Theatre World magazine and reminisces: just back from World War I, he meets lovely singer Selina Rogers at a soldiers' ball and promises to come back to her when he "gets to be somebody." Years go by, and Bill and Selina's rising careers intersect only briefly, since Selina is unwilling to "settle down." Will she ever change her mind? Concludes with a big all-star show hosted by Cab Calloway. Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Musical

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

17 November 1943 (Sweden)  »

Also Known As:

Der Tänzer auf den Stufen  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Two musical numbers were deleted from the release print: "Good-for-Nothin' Joe" (music by Rube Bloom, lyrics by Ted Koehler), sung by Lena Horne, who already was identified with this torch song via her 1941 Victor recording as the vocalist with Charlie Barnet and His Orchestra; and "Alfred the Moocher," a parody by Cab Calloway of his trademark "Minnie the Moocher" (music and lyrics by Calloway, Irving Mills and Clarence Gaskill). The Alfred being spoofed likely is renowned film composer and music director Alfred Newman. Only a voice track of the send-up remains. On a V-Disc of selections from the film made by Miss Horne with the Calloway band, "Good-for-Nothin' Joe" was included. See more »

Goofs

The first time Selena says "Bill Williamson" (in the first scene, before her character has met him) her mouth quite clearly says "Bill Robinson. Bill Robinson played Bill Williamson. See more »

Quotes

Bill Williamson: Clem never told me you could sing like that, Selina.
Selina Rogers: I couldn't when Clem went away... but I practiced, and I studied. I've always been ambitious. Haven't you, Bill?
Bill Williamson: Never have been, except to get three square meals a day, regular. But I'm beginning to see things different now.
See more »


Soundtracks

My, My, Ain't That Somethin'
(1933) (uncredited)
Written by Pinky Tomlin and Harry Tobias
Performed by Bill Robinson, Cab Calloway and His Band, and danced by The Nicholas Brothers
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
singin in the rain
6 April 2004 | by See all my reviews

A sensational treat for anyone who does NOT love musicals to re wire their brain into why 40s dance musicals are often a major discovery. In Australia in 1944 - and I am sure many other Anglo countries, this awesome musical was NOT released! It was considered 'not for us' by the dim censorship board of the time. It was seen in a major release in Sydney in the late 80s and scored a bullseye with modern audiences immediately. Other commenters here will fill you in on the storyline and some sneer pointlessly, but take the general consensus that this is the major showcase of black talent on film from the time. Seen in a cinema the audience nearly loses their mind (and seats ) during the finale with the Nicholas Brothers. I like the woman listed here who showed it to high school kids who loved it...and that is the real test of a great old' film. I have had the same unforgettable experience in cinemas showing this film. It is absolute dynamite! Teenage boys especially watching this get the shock of their young minds at a genuine 1943 rap scene on board a paddleboat. The 90s rap performer EEK-A-MOUSE definitely got his look from this film!


29 of 30 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 42 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page