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Phantom of the Opera
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Phantom of the Opera (1943) More at IMDbPro »

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Phantom of the Opera -- This is the story of a disfigured violinist who haunts the Paris Opera House

Overview

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6.6/10   3,612 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Eric Taylor (screenplay) &
Samuel Hoffenstein (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Phantom of the Opera on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
27 August 1943 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
In flaming Technicolor! See more »
Plot:
This is the story of a disfigured violinist who haunts the Paris Opera House Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Won 2 Oscars. Another 2 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
The Mad Scourge of the Paris Opera See more (72 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Nelson Eddy ... Anatole Garron
Susanna Foster ... Christine DuBois

Claude Rains ... Erique Claudin
Edgar Barrier ... Raoul Daubert
Leo Carrillo ... Signor Ferretti
Jane Farrar ... Biancarolli
J. Edward Bromberg ... Amiot
Fritz Feld ... Lecours
Frank Puglia ... Villeneuve
Steven Geray ... Vercheres
Barbara Everest ... Aunt

Hume Cronyn ... Gerard
Fritz Leiber ... Franz Liszt
Nicki Andre ... Lorenzi
Gladys Blake ... Jeanne
Elvira Curci ... Biancarolli's Maid
Hans Herbert ... Marcel
Kate Drain Lawson ... Landlady (as Kate Lawson)

Miles Mander ... Pleyel
Rosina Galli ... Christine's Maid
Walter O. Stahl ... Doctor (as Walter Stahl)
Paul Marion ... Desjardines
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Richard Bartell ... Reporter (uncredited)
Stanley Blystone ... Officer (uncredited)
Renee Carson ... Georgette (uncredited)
Wheaton Chambers ... Reporter (uncredited)
Lane Chandler ... Officer (uncredited)
Edward Clark ... Usher (uncredited)
James Conaty ... Operagoer (uncredited)
Cyril Delevanti ... Bookkeeper (uncredited)
William Desmond ... Stagehand (uncredited)
Helen Dickson ... Operagoer (uncredited)
Ernest Golm ... Office Manager (uncredited)
Hank Mann ... Stagehand (uncredited)
Anthony Marlowe ... 'Marta' Singer (uncredited)
Alphonse Martell ... Policeman (uncredited)
Eric Mayne ... Reporter (uncredited)
Belle Mitchell ... Feretti's Maid (uncredited)

James Mitchell ... Reporter (uncredited)
Beatrice Roberts ... Nurse (uncredited)
Muni Seroff ... Reporter (uncredited)
Johnny Walsh ... Office Boy (uncredited)
Tudor Williams ... 'Marta' Singer (uncredited)
Marek Windheim ... Renfrit (uncredited)

Directed by
Arthur Lubin 
 
Writing credits
Eric Taylor (screenplay) &
Samuel Hoffenstein (screenplay)

John Jacoby (adaptation)

Gaston Leroux (novel "Le Fantôme de L'Opéra")

Hans Jacoby  uncredited

Produced by
George Waggner .... producer
Jack J. Gross .... executive producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Edward Ward 
 
Cinematography by
W. Howard Greene (director of photography)
Hal Mohr (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Russell F. Schoengarth  (as Russell Schoengarth)
 
Art Direction by
Alexander Golitzen 
John B. Goodman 
 
Set Decoration by
Russell A. Gausman  (as R.A. Gausman)
Ira Webb  (as Ira S. Webb)
 
Costume Design by
Vera West 
 
Makeup Department
Emily Moore .... hair stylist
Jack P. Pierce .... makeup artist (as Jack Pierce)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Charles S. Gould .... assistant director (as Charles Gould)
 
Art Department
Nelson Eddy .... sculptor: bronze statue of Christine DuBois
 
Sound Department
Bernard B. Brown .... sound director
Joe Lapis .... sound technician
 
Special Effects by
Tim Baar .... special effects (uncredited)
 
Visual Effects by
John P. Fulton .... special photography (uncredited)
Russell Lawson .... matte artist (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Arthur Schutt .... orchestrator
William Tyroler .... choral direction
Edward Ward .... musical director
Harold Zweifel .... orchestrator
 
Other crew
Joan Hathaway .... dialogue director
Lester Horton .... opera sequences staged by
Natalie Kalmus .... technicolor color director
William von Wymetal .... opera sequences staged by
 

Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
92 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Certification:
Argentina:Atp | Australia:G (cable rating) | Australia:PG (original rating) | Brazil:14 | Finland:K-16 | Netherlands:12 | Netherlands:14 (original rating) (1947) | Spain:13 | Sweden:15 | UK:PG | USA:Approved (PCA #9388) | West Germany:12 (nf)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The Universal Studios' stage 28 floor-foot print, built for the 1925 B&W Lon Chaney "Phantom of the Opera" feature film, is enormous. The European horseshoe Paris Opera Theatre's three tiered box audience seating area surrounds the floor audience ramped area. The master wide-shot from the top rear box seat area encompasses the stage proscenium, orchestra pit, and the chandelier. The top of the interior theatre ceiling master shot is completed with a matte painting. The audience area is one third of the stage's foot print. The North end of stage 28 encompasses the raised stage area. What really makes this stage unique is that in 1925, an elaborate 30'-0" diameter mechanical turntable sits in the center of the front stage area, allowing forty (40) feet from the back edge of the turntable to the rear stage back-wall. The basement of stage 28 houses the original turntable mechanical mechanism to turn the 30' diameter turntable. All of the mechanics for the turntable have remained intact, sitting in their original structural position. The turntable centers on a center cylindrical shaft, with triangular inverted bracing branches, welded to the center shaft, similar to an inverted umbrella brace. The entire weight of the turntable is thrust upon this center turning spindle. After the original film was completed, the turntable area of the stage floor was covered with three layers of 3/4" thick plywood 4'-0" x 10'-0" sheets, which allowed future film sets to be built upon the turntable stage area for feature filming. When a camera crane is used on the stage, allowances have to be considered with the turntable's floor position, related to the film set requirements. The original stage had a theatre pin rail system with hanging pipe arbors for electrical lights, existing on the stage right area. The raised stage area was utilized for feature film "process photography" because of the depth required for a film projector onto a rear screen, enough room for a camera and crew, with an acting/performance area in front of the screen. The projector camera has to be in direct center of the filming camera's lens point of view position, with a depth of field allowance. The 1943 Universal Studios Technicolor remake of "Phantom of the Opera" stripped the plywood floor covering in order to utilize the turntable for the film's stage production numbers. The turntable mechanism was tuned up and used. After this 1943 film was completed, the stage flooring was installed covering the turntable. The turntable has never been used since the 1943 feature film. The interior Opera House theatre has been filmed, and the production stage area of stage 28 has been host to many feature and television films.See more »
Goofs:
Revealing mistakes: The use of a stunt-double for Claude Rains at the climactic cave-in is very obvious! The double has a bigger physique than Rains, and curly hair.See more »
Quotes:
Signor Ferretti:[FERRETTI is telling CLAUDIN that if he can no longer pay for CHRISTINE's lessons, FERRETTI will have to stop teaching her] I'm sorry, Claudin. Really sorry. If I had the time- But my expenses are great, and you must remember that many who can pay are waiting to study with me. Well, I'll let her come a few times, and, uh, then I will tell her she no longer needs me.
Enrique Claudin:B-But that isn't true.
Signor Ferretti:As a matter of fact, if you had the money, she might be launched on a career very soon. I assume that Mademoiselle Dubois has not the means to pay for her own instructions.
[...]
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
MARTHA (Act III, opera excerpt)See more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
11 out of 12 people found the following review useful.
The Mad Scourge of the Paris Opera, 13 August 2006
Author: bkoganbing from Buffalo, New York

When Universal decided to remake Lon Chaney's classic silent version of the opera, sound opened up a rather obvious vista for the film. We can make it as much about opera as the phantom haunting the Paris Opera.

A task rendered considerably easier by the presence of Nelson Eddy and Susanne Foster. Unlike his screen partner at MGM, Jeanette MacDonald, Nelson Eddy came from the opera to the cinema. He always viewed himself as a singer first, films were something he did to get publicity for his concert tours. But Eddy always loved the grand opera, it could easily been his career path. Consequently The Phantom of the Opera and the arias he sings here always had a special place in his affections. We see a lot of the real Nelson here.

Another one of his interests was sculpture. The bust of Susanna Foster that Claude Rains stole from Eddy's dressing room is something that Nelson Eddy actually did. Sculpting was a hobby of his and as you can see he was quite good at it. Might have made a living doing that as well.

Susanna Foster who had a lovely soprano voice gave up her career soon after this most acclaimed of her films. A pity too, it was a real loss to the screen.

This Phantom of the Opera has a bit of comedy in it as well. Baritone Nelson Eddy and Inspector of the Surete Edgar Barrier have an uneasy rivalry going for the affections of Foster. The scenes involving this are nicely staged by director Arthur Lubin, more known for doing Abbott and Costello comedies.

This may have been Edgar Barrier's best film role. He was a more than competent player, his career probably suffering because he was a bit too much like Warren William who was himself a poor man's John Barrymore. Barrier played equally well as villains or as a good guy as he is here. Another fine role for him even though he only has one scene is in Cyrano de Bergerac where he plays the very sly and all knowing and discerning Cardinal Richelieu.

Of course Phantom of the Opera is really made by the performance of Claude Rains as the mild mannered, inoffensive Eric Claudin, a violinist in the Paris Opera who is crushing out big time on Susanna Foster. We see him first being told after 20 years he's being given the sack by the company. What they describe sounds an awful lot like Carpel Tunnel Syndrome that he's developed which is affecting his playing the violin. Bad news for Susanna Foster also because he's been her secret benefactor in paying for voice lessons.

There isn't any middle aged man who doesn't identify with Rains. Tossed out of his job, the rent due, crushing out big time on a young girl, a lot of us have been there. Then when he thinks an unscrupulous music publisher is stealing a concerto he's written, he loses it completely and kills him. And when acid is thrown in his face disfiguring him, it's a short journey to madness.

Rains really makes us feel for Claudin. In that sense the film is not a horror picture in that we're dealing with monsters or unworldly creatures that Universal so specialized in. The man who becomes the Phantom is all too real, too human, and if we're pushed right, could be any one of us.

Can you do better than opera arias by Nelson Eddy and a classic performance by Claude Rains? I think not.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (72 total) »

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