Phantom Lady
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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011

7 items from 2016


Brazil (1944)

9 December 2016 8:27 PM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Good neighbor policy? Wartime exigencies inspired an intra-hemisphere cultural exchange, with the movies seizing on the new popularity of Latin music. Republic’s contribution gives us the great songs of Ady Barroso and a full soundtrack of his compositions — in a featherweight musical romance, of course.

Brazil

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1944 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 91 min. / Street Date December 6, 2016 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98

Starring Tito Guízar, Virginia Bruce, Edward Everett Horton, Robert Livingston, Veloz and Yolanda, Fortunio Bonanova, Richard Lane, Frank Puglia, Aurora Miranda, Billy Daniel, Dan Seymour, Roy Rogers.

Cinematography Jack A. Marta

Film Editor Fred Allen

Songs Ary Barroso, Hoagy Carmichael

Written by Frank Gill Jr., Laura Kerr, Richard English

Produced by Robert North

Directed by Joseph Santley

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

The wartime ‘Good Neighbor Policy’ was a P.R. blitz intended to steer South America toward the U.S. and away from the Axis. »

- Glenn Erickson

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Cry of the City

3 December 2016 10:14 AM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Robert Siodmak’s superb noir classic pits two graduates of Little Italy against one other: a crook who can deceive relatives and seduce strangers into helping him, and the cop who wants to put him out of business. Starring the great Richard Conte, with Victor Mature in what might be his best role.

Cry of the City

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1948 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 95 min. / Street Date November 15, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring Victor Mature, Richard Conte, Fred Clark, Shelley Winters, Betty Garde, Berry Kroeger, Tommy Cook, Debra Paget, Hope Emerson, Roland Winters, Walter Baldwin, Mimi Aguglia, Kathleen Howard, Konstantin Shayne, Tito Vuolo.

Cinematography Lloyd Ahern

Original Music Alfred Newman

Written by Richard Murphy from the novel The Chair for Martin Rome by Henry Edward Helseth

Produced by Sol C. Siegel

Directed by Robert Siodmak

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Perhaps because of a legal or rights issue, Robert Siodmak »

- Glenn Erickson

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Joe Corallo: The Ray of Light

16 August 2016 5:00 AM, PDT | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

It’s been brought to my attention that CW Seed (the CW’s digital content hub) will be airing a new animated DC Entertainment series, Freedom Fighters: The Ray, in 2017. What makes the announcement of this new series extra newsworthy is that The Ray himself gay and would be the first gay superhero to be the lead in his own TV series. Pretty neat, right?

Before I discuss the impact the first gay superhero to lead his own TV series has on me, I’d like to talk a little about who The Ray is, since there is a good chance you are unfamiliar with this character. Hell, I was only vaguely aware of this character myself.

The Ray was original conceived by Golden Age artist Lou Fine and premiered in issue #14 of Smash Comics, part of Quality Comics’ lineup. Lou Fine worked on other characters at Quality Comics including The Black Condor, »

- Joe Corallo

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The Ray will show Arrowverse characters as "you never saw them before"

11 August 2016 10:17 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Den Of Geek Dec 8, 2016

Marc Guggenheim has been teasing The Ray, which will apparently show "Arrowverse characters in ways you never saw them before"...

Following on the success of the animated Vixen series, CW Seed will debut Freedom Fighters: The Ray in 2017. Today, we've got an update about the state of the upcoming series from Arrowverse veteran Marc Guggenheim

See related  Sherlock: Benedict Cumberbatch plays down talk of show ending Sherlock series 3: 111 things we learned from the special edition DVDs Sherlock: The Abominable Bride review

Guggenheim told Collider, "We just finished the outline for The Ray. I’ve got my writing staff assembled, we’re all working on it. I’m actually really excited about it, not just because the project’s cool, but because basically we’re going about writing it a different way than we did Vixen. It’s a bit more ambitious. It ties »

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CW Seed Set To Debut New Gay Superhero DC Series Freedom Fighters: The Ray

11 August 2016 10:17 AM, PDT | ComicBookMovie.com | See recent ComicBookMovie news »

DC's The Ray is coming to CW Seed in a new series called Freedom Fighters: The Ray from Greg Berlanti and Marc Guggenheim. This incarnation of the hero will be inspired by Grant Morrison’s new take on the character from his Multiversity comic, and "will introduce the first gay Super Hero to lead a show." We don't know for sure which other DC characters will be joining Terrill on his adventures, but The Phantom Lady and Black Condor, at least, can be glimpsed on the official artwork. "Raymond 'Ray' Terrill was a reporter who discovered a group of government scientists working on a secret project to turn light into a weapon of mass destruction. But before he could report on his findings, the project head exposed Ray to a “genetic light bomb.” The bomb failed to kill him and instead gifted Ray with light-based powers. With these abilities, Ray »

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The Smallest Show On Earth: In Memory Of The Bijou (1957) And The Alger (1940-2015)

18 June 2016 10:07 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

The delightful British comedy The Smallest Show on Earth headlines a great Saturday matinee offering from the UCLA Film and Television Archive on June 25 as their excellent series “Marquee Movies: Movies on Moviegoing” wraps up. So it seemed like a perfect time to resurrect my review of the movie, which celebrates the collective experience of seeing cinema in a darkened, and in this case dilapidated old auditorium, alongside my appreciation of my own hometown movie house, the Alger, which opened in 1940 and closed last year, one more victim of economics and the move toward digital distribution and exhibition.

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“You mean to tell me my uncle actually charged people to go in there? And people actually paid?” –Matt Spenser (Bill Travers) upon first seeing the condition of the Bijou Kinema, in The Smallest Show on Earth

In Basil Dearden’s charming and wistful 1957 British comedy The Smallest Show on Earth (also »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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Review: "The Chase" (1946) Starring Robert Cummings; Kino Lorber Blu-ray Edition

13 May 2016 3:55 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By John  M. Whalen

Cornell Woolrich is a writer whose work was much loved and cherished by fans of film noir. The Internet Movie Database lists 102 credits for him for both film and TV shows—titles including “Rear Window,” “The Bride Wore Black,” “The Night Has a Thousand Eyes,” “Black Angel,” “Fear in the Night,” and “Phantom Lady,” He didn’t write any screenplays that I know of. The films and TV shows were all adapted from a prolific output of stories written under his Woolrich and William Irish pseudonyms, and under his real name, George Hopley.

While Raymond Chandler, Dashiell Hammett, and James M. Cain make up the Big Three in noir fiction, Woolrich carved out a special niche for himself. Chandler, and Hammett wrote about tough guy heroes who usually overcame the web of evil they encountered. Cain’s heroes weren’t always so lucky, but at least »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011

7 items from 2016


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