5.9/10
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My Kingdom for a Cook (1943)

Approved | | Comedy, Romance | 27 October 1943 (USA)
Rudyard Morley, an eccentric ambassador from the Court of Saint James, is on a good-will lecture tour of the United States. His English gourmet cook is unable to accompany him, and this ... See full summary »

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Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay) | 4 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview:
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Bill Carter ...
Lt. Mike Scott
Isobel Elsom ...
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Agnes Willoughby
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Sam Thornton
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Lars 'Pretty Boy' Peterson
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Professor Harlow
Reginald Sheffield ...
Reuter's English Reporter
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Angus Sheffield
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Storyline

Rudyard Morley, an eccentric ambassador from the Court of Saint James, is on a good-will lecture tour of the United States. His English gourmet cook is unable to accompany him, and this upsets him more than a little bit. He hires away a cook of eighteen years service to a New England socialite. This act of diplomatic-rudeness gives rise to several complication which grow more complicated when Morley's daughter begins a romance with the son of the socialite. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

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Taglines:

LOST, STRAYED OR STOLEN A COOK, Liberal Reward of LAUGHS if Returned Before Supper! (original poster) See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Romance

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

27 October 1943 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

El escritor y la cocinera  »

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Technical Specs

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Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The character and appearance of Rudyard Morley were inspired by George Bernard Shaw, the real-life playwright, critic, and personality. See more »

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User Reviews

 
The Less of this The Merrier!
17 January 2007 | by See all my reviews

First, Charles Coburn looks awful in a full beard. Second, the movie is predicated on a premise that doesn't hold up: If a famous writer were to come to the US from England, why would he be concerned about having a good cook? He would be dining out with his hosts and hostesses every night! The character Coburn plays is an unfunny variation on Sheridan Whiteside. Did the man who came to dinner fuss over whether he had his own cook? No, of course not: He had the people with whom he was holed up provide his meals and cater to his every whim.

The movie has some charming female character actresses. Marguerite Chapman is appealing as the Coburn character's daughter, too. But the ex-solider she falls for lacks charm in spades. Additionally, the two have zero chemistry.

It's wonderful seeing little-known movies from Columbia again. But I can't be gracious and pretend that every one of them is a lost treasure.


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