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The Memphis Belle: A Story of a Flying Fortress (1944) Poster

Trivia

The "Memphis Belle" seen in this film, a Boeing B-17F (serial no.41-24485), was moved to the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio in October, 2005 to undergo a multi-year restoration process. As of October 2015, it is still undergoing that process which is scheduled to last another three years, after which the aircraft will be placed on display for the public.
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One of director William Wyler's cameramen was shot down and killed while flying in another B-17 during a combat mission over Germany.
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Director William Wyler was injured when an anti-aircraft shell exploded close to where he was sitting in the aircraft, resulting in him losing most of his hearing in one ear.
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At the very beginning of the scene where the King and Queen are shown driving towards the waiting crew there is a British Horsa glider in the background. The Pilot of the Horsa was Sgt Brian Vincent accompanied by, S/Sgt Bert Harget. They had been forced to make an emergency landing during a cross country training exercise when the tug developed an engine fault. They were made very welcome by the Americans and their Glider was placed at the end of the line of "Forts". The details are still there in Bert's Flying Log.
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Some of the footage was lost and portions of the film are actually recreations shot over Santa Monica, California.
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Pilot Robert Morgan named the aircraft after his girlfriend at the time, Margaret Polk, of Memphis, Tenn. Morgan chose the nose artwork from a 1941 illustration in Esquire magazine by famous pin-up artist George Petty. She is wearing a blue outfit on the port (left) side of the aircraft and a red one on the starboard (right) side.
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This was the first movie to be reviewed on the front page of the New York Times.
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