6.8/10
176
7 user 5 critic

The Meanest Man in the World (1943)

Approved | | Comedy | 12 February 1943 (USA)
Compassionate small-town lawyer Richard Clarke moves to New York City to seek his fortune, but is unsuccessful until he takes a friend's advice and tries to convince the world he's a ... See full summary »

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(screenplay), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Cast overview:
...
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Janie Brown
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Shufro
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Frederick P. Leggitt
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Arthur Brown
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Kitty Crockett
Margaret Seddon ...
Mrs. Frances H. Leggitt
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Wife (Park Ave. Neighbor)
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Storyline

Compassionate small-town lawyer Richard Clarke moves to New York City to seek his fortune, but is unsuccessful until he takes a friend's advice and tries to convince the world he's a ruthless heel. Suddenly he's the most popular lawyer in town -- but he could lose his fiancée. Written by Kevin Ackley <kackley1@aol.com>

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Taglines:

Meet the world's biggest heel in the screen's most hiss-terical show!

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

12 February 1943 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

El hombre más malo del mundo  »

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Technical Specs

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(Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

On July 8, 1942, both The Hollywood Reporter and Daily Variety revealed that Twentieth Century-Fox was scrapping the film despite an investment of about $150,000 so far. The next day, The Hollywood Reporter described Jack Benny as being unhappy with some of the screenplay, which Mr. Benny complained was too juvenile. For this project, Fox had given Jack approval of the script, director and co-star. Mr. Benny and the studio quickly settled their differences, and shooting began on July 22, 1942, with principal photography lasting into early September. See more »

Connections

Version of The Meanest Man in the World (1923) See more »

Soundtracks

Swanee River
(uncredited)
Written by Stephen Foster
heard when Jack Benny is in blackface
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User Reviews

He's mean but doesn't mean it
27 May 2002 | by (Minffordd, North Wales) – See all my reviews

"The Meanest Man in the World" has a misleading title ... at least for audiences here in Britain where, if a person is called "mean", it means that he's a cheapskate. When I saw that this film starred Jack Benny (who usually played cheapskates), I assumed that the title referred to his legendary tightwad antics. I was wrong. In "The Meanest Man in the World" (based on a play by George M. Cohan), Jack Benny plays a nice-guy lawyer who's broke all the time because he hasn't any clients. When he picks up the phone in his law office to make a call, the Accounts department of the phone company is on the other end to turn off his service for non-payment.

This movie raises an interesting point: namely, that nice people are often much less successful than S.O.B. types. When nice-guy Benny decides to pretend to be a meanie, his law practice starts getting more clients. But in order to become a real success, Benny will have to become a real meanie. Is it worth it?

This movie is basically a character study. It isn't a flat-out comedy like most of Benny's starring films, so don't expect too many laughs. Eddie Anderson ("Rochester") plays Benny's factotum assistant here, but their relationship here isn't quite like Rochester's relationship with "Mister Benny" in their radio show.

There's one funny gag. Benny's one-man legal practice is in an office building full of law firms. When an ambulance drives past the building with its siren blaring, Benny hands his business card to Rochester and orders him to follow that ambulance. As Rochester rushes out into the hallway, all the doors of all the law offices open, and all the lawyers come running out with their own business cards!

Anne Revere (a talented actress whom I never liked, somehow) is wasted here in a poor role. The romance between Jack Benny and Priscilla Lane isn't believable, especially as Lane is far too young for him. "The Meanest Man in the World" was a popular stage play, but this film version has very little to recommend it. I'll rate this movie 3 points out of 10, only because I'm a Jack Benny fan.


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