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Madame Curie (1943) Poster

(1943)

Trivia

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In her final years at MGM, Joan Crawford was handed weak scripts in the hopes that she'd break her contract. Two films she hungered to appear in were Random Harvest (1942) and Madame Curie (1943). Both films went to bright new star Greer Garson instead, and Crawford left the studio soon after.
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Third of eight movies that paired Greer Garson and Walter Pidgeon.
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Director Mervyn LeRoy replaced Albert Lewin, who was fired shortly before production began.
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Gigi Perreau's first movie.
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"Lux Radio Theater" broadcast a 60 minute radio adaptation of the movie on September 16, 1946 with Greer Garson and Walter Pidgeon reprising their film roles.
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Originally planned for Greta Garbo and Spencer Tracy to star in.
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The third film in three years to star Greer Garson and Walter Pidgeon to be nominated for Best Picture. Blossoms in the Dust (1941) began the trend in 1941 with Mrs. Miniver (1942) sweeping the Oscars the following year.
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Aldous Huxley worked on a draft of the screenplay but MGM rejected it for being "too literal".
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The film plays fast and loose with the facts, ignoring Curie's sister who also lived in Paris and Curie's own political activism. She fiercely championed the liberation of her native Poland.
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The third of Greer Garson's run of five consecutive Oscar nominations for Best Actress. She had been nominated for Blossoms in the Dust (1941) and won for Mrs. Miniver (1942). She would be nominated again the next two years for Mrs. Parkington (1944) and The Valley of Decision (1945).
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Only one scene in the entire film - a long shot of the Curies on honeymoon - was actually filmed outside of the studio, and even that was second unit.
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

The film makes no mention of the rather ironic fact that Marie Curie died of aplastic anemia at the age of 66, most likely because of her handling of radium in her lifetime. Her lab books are kept under lock and key as they are still irradiated more than 100 years after use.
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