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The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943) Poster

Trivia

Jump to: Spoilers (1)
Winston Churchill hated the film and wanted it banned.
Clive Candy goes to Germany to fight a duel over propaganda about the British treatment of people in South Africa in the Boer War. Many of the cited things he was dueling over were in fact true. "Concentration camp" was first used to describe British camps in South Africa in 1899-1902.
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At the end of the film, when the camera zooms in on the tapestry, the Latin phrase "Sic Transit Gloria Candy" is shown. This translates to, "Thus passes away the glory of Candy."
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Michael Powell's golden cocker spaniels Erik and Spangle make their second appearance on film as Clive and Barbara return from their honeymoon.
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Director Michael Powell was intrigued by how second-unit cameraman Jack Cardiff was filming the animal heads and gave Cardiff his first big break as the cinematographer on his next film, Stairway to Heaven (1946).
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The filmmakers wanted Laurence Olivier to play Clive Candy, but he was prevented from being furloughed from the Navy by Prime Minister Winston Churchill, who didn't want the film to be made. Churchill didn't want to bolster the production with an actor and star of Olivier's caliber, as he felt the movie was critical of a type of British patriot. Olivier was allowed to take a leave from the Navy to make a film about William Shakespeare's patriotic King Henry V in The Chronicle History of King Henry the Fift with His Battell Fought at Agincourt in France (1944). Roger Livesey was cast instead. A generation later he played Olivier's father, Billy Rice, in The Entertainer (1960), though he was actually less than a year older than Olivier.
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Three-quarters of the Germans in the crowd at the POW camp are "carefully painted and positioned" plaster models.
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According to the directors, the idea for the film did not come from the comic strip by David Low, but from a scene cut from their previous film, One of Our Aircraft Is Missing (1942), in which an elderly member of the crew tells a younger one, "You don't know what it's like to be old."
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Towards the end of the movie, Candy's assistant Murdoch, played by John Laurie, tells Candy that he has joined the Home Guard. 25 years later Laurie would go on to play Pte. Frazer in all 80 episodes of Dad's Army (1968), a British sitcom revolving around the misadventures of the members of a local group of Home Guard during World War II.
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Colonel Blimp was a British cartoon character in a then well-known strip. The producers decided to use the name for the movie.
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Early in the film, Clive Candy tells Col. Betteridge that he has been speaking with Arthur Conan Doyle, author of the Sherlock Holmes stories. Betteridge, an avid fan, turns and quotes to his subordinate, Major Plumley: "Lovely evening, my dear Watson..." Plumley is played by Ian Fleming, who earlier portrayed Dr. Watson in Sherlock Holmes' Fatal Hour (1931), Sherlock Holmes and the Missing Rembrandt (1932), The Triumph of Sherlock Holmes (1935), and Murder at the Baskervilles (1937). His Sherlock Holmes, Arthur Wontner, also appears in a small role later in the film.
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One of the earliest films to directly refer to The Wizard of Oz (1939) (one of the characters sings part of "We're Off To See the Wizard"), proving rather conclusively that "Oz" was more successful and popular on its first release than is sometimes claimed.
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The tapestry seen in the opening credits was made by the members of The Royal College of Needlework.
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Director Michael Powell originally wanted Wendy Hiller to play Blimp's "ideal woman", but she was unavailable, so the part was given to Deborah Kerr.
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

This was one of Powell-Pressburger films that wasn't favored among many Germans especially due to the way the film portrayed World War 1 and National Socialist Germany. This is because it was Germany and her Allies who wanted peace and they sent their peace terms to Great Britain and also America to end World War 1 which were published in several newspapers (October 5, 1916 & December 13-14, 1916). For Example, Chicago Tribune published Germany's peace terms to Great Britain and America on December 13, 1916. But Great Britain's rejection of Germany's peace offers was also published in December 13, 1916 of Chicago Tribune. On December 20, 1916 (Chicago Tribune), Great Britain again announced their rejection of the peace terms of Germany and her Allies with the headline "War Must Go On: Lloyd George to Germany." Many Germans also disliked how the film portrayed Nazi Germany as evil.
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