MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Down 1,758 this week

Guadalcanal Diary (1943)

 -  Drama | War  -  27 October 1943 (USA)
6.9
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 6.9/10 from 1,476 users  
Reviews: 31 user | 11 critic

Concentrating on the personal lives of those involved, a war correspondent takes us through the preparations, landing and initial campaign on Guadalcanal during WWII.

Director:

Writers:

(by), (screenplay), 2 more credits »
0Check in
0Share...

User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 34 titles
created 07 Sep 2011
 
a list of 36 titles
created 27 Nov 2011
 
a list of 40 titles
created 9 months ago
 
a list of 33 titles
created 8 months ago
 
a list of 21 titles
created 5 months ago
 

Related Items

Search for "Guadalcanal Diary" on Amazon.com

Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: Guadalcanal Diary (1943)

Guadalcanal Diary (1943) on IMDb 6.9/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of Guadalcanal Diary.

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
Preston Foster ...
...
Sgt. Hook Malone
...
...
Capt. Davis
...
Jesus ('Soose') Alvarez
...
Pvt. Johnny ('Chicken') Anderson
...
Capt. James Cross
Minor Watson ...
Col. Wallace E. Grayson
Ralph Byrd ...
Ned Rowman
...
Sgt. Butch
Reed Hadley ...
War correspondent / Narrator
John Archer ...
Lt. Thurmond
Edit

Storyline

Concentrating on the personal lives of those involved, a war correspondent takes us through the preparations, landing and initial campaign on Guadalcanal during WWII. Written by Doug Sederberg <vornoff@sonic.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | War

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

27 October 1943 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Richard Tregaskis' Guadalcanal Diary  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Guadalcanal is situated in the Solomon Islands in the Pacific Ocean, north-east of Australia. Its local name is Isatabu and contains the country's capital, Honiara. The island is humid and mostly made up of jungle with a surface area of 2,510 square miles or 6,500-km². Guadacanal was named after Pedro de Ortega's home town Guadacanal in Andalusia, Spain. de Ortega worked under Álvaro de Mendaña who charted the island in 1568. See more »

Goofs

In several scenes, Japanese soldiers are seen firing U.S.-made and -issued Thompson .45-cal. submachine guns, identical to the one carried by Sgt. Hook Malone. In one scene, a Japanese machine gun nest is firing a Thompson mounted on a tripod to make it appear as a light machine gun. See more »

Quotes

Cpl. Aloysius T. 'Taxi' Potts: As soon as our planes get here they'll be sorry. They won't look so pretty!
Pvt. Johnny 'Chicken' Anderson: Yeah, but where *are* our planes?
See more »

Crazy Credits

The film's opening prologue in the preface of a book states: A new chapter in the history of America by a correspondent who landed on Guadalcanal with the first detachment of United States Marines. See more »

Connections

Edited into All This and World War II (1976) See more »

Soundtracks

Marine Hymn
(uncredited)
Music by Jacques Offenbach from "Geneviève de Brabant"
Played during the opening credits and occasionally in the score
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Regarded, justifiably, as one of the best war films ever
11 November 2002 | by (California) – See all my reviews

Outstanding recounting of the U.S. Marine invasion of Guadalcanal Island. Thankfully free of much of the harsh jingoistic tone and phony heroics so evident in films such as Ray Enright's "Gung Ho!" of the same year (although some elements of that do manage to creep in), virtually everything in this film works--Reed Hadley's sometimes sonorous but nonetheless sensitive narration; uniformly fine performances; a script that, while seeming somewhat dated and familiar now, nonetheless has a sharp edge to it, with several of the characters actually being quite well-drawn; top-notch battle scenes, both large-scale and close-in, that don't have the staginess and precisely rehearsed look unfortunately common to many war films; some welcome humor of the kind that any current or former GI would recognize; and the crisp, sharp editing associated more with Warner Bros. than 20th Century-Fox, which made it. The film does, in fact, have a definite Warners look and feel to it, and could easily be mistaken as a work by legendary Warners director Raoul Walsh, although it was actually directed by Lewis Seiler--like Walsh a Warners alumnus, and while Seiler is not in Walsh's league, this is far and away his best and most accomplished picture (and if any of you can figure out what the hell poster Christopher Mulrooney is talking about in a preceding review of this film, I wish you'd tell me). A previous poster has mentioned that the picture has some rather glaring historical inaccuracies, and I have no doubt that he's correct. Still, this is an exciting and riveting film--and, surprisingly enough, often a quite touching one, a quality not often associated with war pictures--that I believe truly deserves its reputation as one of the best war films to come out of Hollywood.


9 of 15 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Discuss Guadalcanal Diary (1943) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?