A young songwriter leaves his Kentucky home to try to make it in New Orleans. Eventually he winds up in New York, where he sells his songs to a music publisher, but refuses to sell his most... See full summary »

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(story), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Cast overview:
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Millie Cook
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Mr. Bones
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Jean Mason
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Mr. Whitlock
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Mr. Felham
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Mr. Cook
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Mr. Mason
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Mrs. Mason
Tom Herbert ...
Homer
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Mr. Deveraux (as Olin Howlin)
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Mr. LaPlant
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Waiter
Brandon Hurst ...
Dignified Man in Audience
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Storyline

A young songwriter leaves his Kentucky home to try to make it in New Orleans. Eventually he winds up in New York, where he sells his songs to a music publisher, but refuses to sell his most treasured composition: "Dixie." The film is based on the life of Daniel Decatur Emmett, who wrote the classic song "Dixie." Written by frankfob2@yahoo.com

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Plot Keywords:

showbiz | minstrel show | See All (2) »

Taglines:

THEIR SWELLEST AND GAYEST MUSICAL HIT (original print ad-all caps) See more »


Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

13 January 1944 (Australia)  »

Also Known As:

A Canção de Dixie  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

"Lux Radio Theater" broadcast a 60 minute radio adaptation of the movie on December 20, 1943 with Bing Crosby and Dorothy Lamour reprising their film roles. See more »

Goofs

The movie changes all sorts of historical facts: The movie makes Emmett a bachelor wooing "Jean Mason" who is confined to a wheelchair. The song Dixie was intended as a sort of dirge but is given a sprightly tempo only because the theater, in the deep south, has caught fire. In fact Emmett married Catherine Rives circa 1853 and remained married until her death in 1875, there is no indication that she was disabled. Dixie was first sung, and at its familiar tempo, in NYC on April 4, 1859, in a non-burning music hall. The movie has only the first verse sung over and over again because, frankly, the second and third verses are a bit "unenlightened" by modern standards. A couple of years later Emmett was appalled that the Confederacy had appropriated his song and he promptly wrote several songs for the Union Army. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Road to Utopia (1945) See more »

Soundtracks

Jimmy Crack Corn (The Blue Tail Fly)
(uncredited)
Written by Daniel Decatur Emmett
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User Reviews

 
... But How Did You Like The Movie ?
5 January 2012 | by (Ramsey, NJ) – See all my reviews

Boy, that was a tough slog getting through all the history lessons and moral instruction regarding slavery. Yes, yes, it was a shameful period in America and minstrel shows were degrading, but most contributors forgot to evaluate "Dixie" - the movie, that is.

Well, let me have a bash at it. When I think back on "Dixie", the first thing I think of is the ballad, "Sunday, Monday or Always", done to perfection by Bing at the beginning and at the end. Much of the rest of the movie is forgettable and uninspired. Paramount had assembled an excellent cast which is largely wasted in this fictitious biography of a forgotten songwriter. Maybe the biggest disappointment was the lack of spectacle and excitement in musical number after lifeless musical number, especially the last one. The choreography was almost non-existent and very understated, except for a dance by the largely wasted Eddie Foy, Jr. The script was desperately in need of a re-write

  • and what's with the fires? There were three separate fires in the


course of "Dixie", one of which should have included Dorothy Lamour's thankless part.

I guess musicals were not Paramount's thing. Such matters were best left to Fox or MGM, or even Universal, which had a few pretty good underbudgetted musicals. Our present rating is a little rich for "Dixie" - I gave it five and upped it to six on the strength of the song "Sunday,Monday or Always", which was gorgeous.


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