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Remembering Actress Gray: Underappreciated Film Noir Heroine

Coleen Gray actress ca. 1950. Coleen Gray: Actress in early Stanley Kubrick film noir, destroyer of men in cult horror 'classic' Actress Coleen Gray, best known as the leading lady in Stanley Kubrick's film noir The Killing and – as far as B horror movie aficionados are concerned – for playing the title role in The Leech Woman, died at age 92 in Aug. 2015. This two-part article, which focuses on Gray's film career, is a revised and expanded version of the original post published at the time of her death. Born Doris Bernice Jensen on Oct. 23, 1922, in Staplehurst, Nebraska, at a young age she moved with her parents, strict Lutheran Danish farmers, to Minnesota. After getting a degree from St. Paul's Hamline University, she relocated to Southern California to be with her then fiancé, an army private. At first, she eked out a living as a waitress at a La Jolla hotel
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Remembering Actress Gray: Underappreciated Film Noir Heroine

Coleen Gray actress ca. 1950. Coleen Gray: Actress in early Stanley Kubrick film noir, destroyer of men in cult horror 'classic' Actress Coleen Gray, best known as the leading lady in Stanley Kubrick's film noir The Killing and – as far as B horror movie aficionados are concerned – for playing the title role in The Leech Woman, died at age 92 in Aug. 2015. This two-part article, which focuses on Gray's film career, is a revised and expanded version of the original post published at the time of her death. Born Doris Bernice Jensen on Oct. 23, 1922, in Staplehurst, Nebraska, at a young age she moved with her parents, strict Lutheran Danish farmers, to Minnesota. After getting a degree from St. Paul's Hamline University, she relocated to Southern California to be with her then fiancé, an army private. At first, she eked out a living as a waitress at a La Jolla hotel
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Leigh Day on TCM: From Southern Belle in 'Controversial' Epic to Rape Victim in Code-Buster

Vivien Leigh ca. late 1940s. Vivien Leigh movies: now controversial 'Gone with the Wind,' little-seen '21 Days Together' on TCM Vivien Leigh is Turner Classic Movies' star today, Aug. 18, '15, as TCM's “Summer Under the Stars” series continues. Mostly a stage actress, Leigh was seen in only 19 films – in about 15 of which as a leading lady or star – in a movie career spanning three decades. Good for the relatively few who saw her on stage; bad for all those who have access to only a few performances of one of the most remarkable acting talents of the 20th century. This evening, TCM is showing three Vivien Leigh movies: Gone with the Wind (1939), 21 Days Together (1940), and A Streetcar Named Desire (1951). Leigh won Best Actress Academy Awards for the first and the third title. The little-remembered film in-between is a TCM premiere. 'Gone with the Wind' Seemingly all
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Last Surviving Gwtw Star and 2-Time Oscar Winner Has Turned 99: As a Plus, She Made U.S. Labor Law History

Olivia de Havilland picture U.S. labor history-making 'Gone with the Wind' star and two-time Best Actress winner Olivia de Havilland turns 99 (This Olivia de Havilland article is currently being revised and expanded.) Two-time Best Actress Academy Award winner Olivia de Havilland, the only surviving major Gone with the Wind cast member and oldest surviving Oscar winner, is turning 99 years old today, July 1.[1] Also known for her widely publicized feud with sister Joan Fontaine and for her eight movies with Errol Flynn, de Havilland should be remembered as well for having made Hollywood labor history. This particular history has nothing to do with de Havilland's films, her two Oscars, Gone with the Wind, Joan Fontaine, or Errol Flynn. Instead, history was made as a result of a legal fight: after winning a lawsuit against Warner Bros. in the mid-'40s, Olivia de Havilland put an end to treacherous
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Wright Minibio Pt.2: Hitchcock Heroine in His Favorite Movie

Teresa Wright in 'Shadow of a Doubt': Alfred Hitchcock heroine (image: Joseph Cotten about to strangle Teresa Wright in 'Shadow of a Doubt') (See preceding article: "Teresa Wright Movies: Actress Made Oscar History.") After scoring with The Little Foxes, Mrs. Miniver, and The Pride of the Yankees, Teresa Wright was loaned to Universal – once initial choices Joan Fontaine and Olivia de Havilland became unavailable – to play the small-town heroine in Alfred Hitchcock's Shadow of a Doubt. (Check out video below: Teresa Wright reminiscing about the making of Shadow of a Doubt.) Co-written by Thornton Wilder, whose Our Town had provided Wright with her first chance on Broadway and who had suggested her to Hitchcock; Meet Me in St. Louis and Junior Miss author Sally Benson; and Hitchcock's wife, Alma Reville, Shadow of a Doubt was based on "Uncle Charlie," a story outline by Gordon McDonell – itself based on actual events.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Schell as Director: Three Academy Award Nominations for His Films

Maximilian Schell movie director (photo: Maximilian Schell and Maria Schell) (See previous post: “Maximilian Schell Dies: Best Actor Oscar Winner for ‘Judgment at Nuremberg.’”) Maximilian Schell’s first film as a director was the 1970 (dubbed) German-language release First Love / Erste Liebe, adapted from Igor Turgenev’s novella, and starring Englishman John Moulder-Brown, Frenchwoman Dominique Sanda, and Schell in this tale about a doomed love affair in Czarist Russia. Italian Valentina Cortese and British Marius Goring provided support. Directed by a former Best Actor Oscar winner, First Love, a movie that could just as easily have been dubbed into Swedish or Swahili (or English), ended up nominated for the Best Foreign Language Film Academy Award. Three years later, nominated in that same category was Schell’s second feature film as a director, The Pedestrian / Der Fußgänger, in which a car accident forces a German businessman to delve deep into his past.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Oldest Surviving Credited Gwtw Performer Has Died

Gone with the Wind’ actress Alicia Rhett dead at 98; was oldest surviving credited Gwtw cast member Gone with the Wind actress Alicia Rhett, the oldest surviving credited cast member of the 1939 Oscar-winning blockbuster, died on January 3, 2014, at the Bishop Gadsden Episcopal Retirement Community in Charleston, South Carolina, where Rhett had been living since August 2002. Alicia Rhett, born on February 1, 1915, in Savannah, Georgia, was 98. (Photo: Alicia Rhett as India Wilkes in Gone with the Wind.) In Gone with the Wind, the David O. Selznick production made in conjunction with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM head Louis B. Mayer was Selznick’s father-in-law), the stage-trained Alicia Rhett played India Wilkes, the embittered sister of Ashley Wilkes, whom Scarlett O’Hara loves — though Ashley eventually marries Melanie Hamilton (Rhett had auditioned for the role), while Scarlett ends up with Rhett Butler. Based on Margaret Mitchell’s bestseller, Gone with the Wind was (mostly) directed by Victor Fleming
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Oscar-Nominated Actress Featured in One of Universal's Biggest Blockbusters Dead at 99

Oscar-nominated ‘Imitation of Life’ actress Juanita Moore has died Juanita Moore, Best Supporting Actress Academy Award nominee for the 1959 blockbuster Imitation of Life, died on New Year’s Day 2014 at her home in Los Angeles. According to various online sources, Juanita Moore (born on October 19, 1922) was 91; her step-grandson, actor Kirk Kahn, said she was 99. (Photo: Juanita Moore in the late ’50s. See also: Juanita Moore and Susan Kohner photos at the 50th anniversary screening of Imitation of Life at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.) Juanita Moore movies The Los Angeles-born Juanita Moore began her show business career as a chorus girl at New York City’s Cotton Club. According to the IMDb, Moore was an extra/bit player in a trio of films of the ’40s, including Vincente Minnelli’s all-black musical Cabin in the Sky (1942) and Elia Kazan’s socially conscious melodrama Pinky (1949), in which Jeanne Crain plays a (very,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Remembering Peter O'Toole, Joan Fontaine, Ned Vizzini and Other Reel-Important People We Lost This Month

  • Movies.com
Reel-Important People is a monthly column that highlights those individuals in or related to the movies who have left us in recent weeks. Below you'll find names big and small and from all areas of the industry, though each was significant to the movies in his or her own way. Frederic Back (1924-2013) - Animator who won two Oscars for his short films Crac! (watch below) and The Man Who Planted Trees. He was also nominated two other times, for All Nothing and The Mighty River. He died of cancer on December 24. (Lat) Joan Fontaine (1917-2013) - Actress who won an Oscar for her lead performance in Hitchcock's Suspicion and was nominated for Rebecca (below) and The Constant Nymph. The sister of fellow...

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See full article at Movies.com »

TCM Remembers 2013 Video; Watch Joan Fontaine and Peter O’Toole Tributes Today

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) will pay tribute to Oscar® winner Joan Fontaine and eight-time Oscar® nominee and honorary Academy Award® recipient Peter O’Toole with tributes Today Sunday, Dec. 29.

The Fontaine collection features Blonde Cheat (1938), The Women (1939), Born To Be Bad (1950), Ivanhoe (1952), Fontaine’s Oscar-nominated roles in The Constant Nymph (1943) and Rebecca (1940), and her Oscar-winning performance in Suspicion (1940).

In the evening, TCM will pay tribute to O’Toole with his Oscar-nominated performances in Lawrence of Arabia (1962), Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1969) and My Favorite Year (1982). Also featured will be a special encore telecast of Peter O’Toole: Live from the TCM Classic Film Festival, a one-hour extended interview with TCM host Robert Osborne taped before a live audience at the 2011 TCM Classic Film Festival.

The following is the complete lineup for TCM’s on-air tributes to Joan Fontaine and Peter O’Toole:

Sunday, Dec. 29

All times are Et/Pt.

TCM Remembers Joan Fontaine

6:30 a.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

TCM honors Peter O'Toole, Joan Fontaine in one-day festival

TCM honors Peter O'Toole, Joan Fontaine in one-day festival
Turner Classic Movies typically slots a multiple-film tribute quickly upon a screen staple's death, but this weekend marks the rarity of two in one day.

The channel splits its schedule Sunday (Dec. 29) between Joan Fontaine during the daytime and Peter O'Toole at night. The portion honoring Fontaine, who died Dec. 15, includes her Oscar-winning turn in the Alfred Hitchcock-directed "Suspicion" plus her nominated performances in "The Constant Nymph" and Hitchcock's "Rebecca."

O'Toole, who died Dec. 14, was an eight-time Oscar nominee and received an honorary award in 2003. TCM will remember him by showing his star-making work in "Lawrence of Arabia" as well as "Goodbye, Mr. Chips" and "My Favorite Year." Also slated is the "Live From the TCM Classic Film Festival" special from 2011, in which principal channel host Robert Osborne interviewed the actor.

"I'm so grateful for the time we had with him," Osborne tells Zap2it, "because he was such
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

Turner Classic Movies Pays Tribute To Peter O'Toole And Joan Fontaine, December 29

  • CinemaRetro
Turner Classic Movies (TCM) will pay tribute to Oscar® winner Joan Fontaine and eight-time Oscar® nominee and honorary Academy Award® recipient Peter O'Toole with tributes on Sunday, Dec. 29.

The Fontaine collection features Blonde Cheat (1938), The Women(1939), Born To Be Bad (1950), Ivanhoe (1952), Fontaine's Oscar-nominated roles in The Constant Nymph (1943) and Rebecca (1940), and her Oscar-winning performance in Suspicion (1940).

In the evening, TCM will pay tribute to O'Toole with his Oscar-nominated performances in Lawrence of Arabia (1962), Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1969) and My Favorite Year (1982). Also featured will be a special encore telecast of Peter O'Toole: Live from the TCM Classic Film Festival, a one-hour extended interview with TCM host Robert Osborne taped before a live audience at the 2011 TCM Classic Film Festival.

In addition to TCM's on-air tributes, short memorial videos are available on the TCM website and YouTube channel:

TCM Remembers Joan Fontaine

TCM Media Room: http://www.tcm.com/mediaroom/video/938673/Joan-Fontaine-tcm-Original-tcm-Remembers.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

From Taylor to Tarantino, from Flapper Moore to Docu-Maker Moore: Something for Everyone at Library of Congress' Packard Screenings

Judgment at Nuremberg,’ Martin Luther King Day documentaries, ‘Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?’: Library of Congress’ Packard Theater January 2014 movies (photo: Maximilian Schell in ‘Judgment at Nuremberg’) Judgment at Nuremberg, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Roger & Me, Pulp Fiction, and Ella Cinders, five National Film Registry 2013 additions will be screened at the LoC’s Packard Campus Theater in January 2014. Directed by the invariably well-intentioned — at times heavy-handedly so — Stanley Kramer, Judgment at Nuremberg (1961) is a surprisingly effective dramatization of the Nazi War Trials. The generally first-rate cast includes Best Actor Academy Award winner Maximilian Schell, Best Actor nominee Spencer Tracy, Best Supporting Actor nominee Montgomery Clift (who reportedly worked for no fee), Best Supporting Actress nominee Judy Garland, Richard Widmark, Burt Lancaster, Marlene Dietrich, and a pre-Star Trek William Shatner. Mike Nichols’ Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966) earned Elizabeth Taylor and Sandy Dennis Oscars, in
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Joan Fontaine obituary

Oscar-winning actor who played threatened heroines for Alfred Hitchcock in Rebecca and Suspicion

It was hard to cast the lead in Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca, filmed by Alfred Hitchcock in 1939. The female fans of the bestseller were very protective of the naive woman whom the widower Max de Winter marries and transports to his ancestral home of Manderley. None of the contenders – including Vivien Leigh, Anne Baxter and Loretta Young – felt right for the second Mrs de Winter, who was every lending-library reader's dream self.

To play opposite Laurence Olivier in the film, the producer David O Selznick suggested instead a 21-year-old actor with whom he was smitten: Joan Fontaine. The prolonged casting process made Fontaine anxious. Vulnerability was central to the part, and you can see that vulnerability, that inability to trust her own judgment, in every frame of the film. The performance brought Fontaine, who has died
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Oscar Winner Joan Fontaine Dead At Age 96

  • CinemaRetro
Joan Fontaine, who won the Best Actress Oscar for Alfred Hitchcock's 1941 classic Suspicion, has died in her California home at age 96. Fontaine began her film career playing attractive but nondescript characters until Hitchcock cast her as the female lead in his 1940 film version of the bestseller Rebecca opposite Laurence Olivier. The film earned her an Oscar nomination and elevated her to one of Hollywood's most in-demand actresses. In 1943 she received a third and final Oscar nomination for The Constant Nymph. Fontaine also won rave notices in the film version of the Gothic novel Jane Eyre, starring opposite Orson Welles. In both films she played an innocent woman whose husband is harboring a shocking secret that is unveiled within the walls of a stately but foreboding country manor. Fontaine's other major films include Ivanhoe, The Emperor Waltz, Kiss the Blood Off My Hands, This Above All, The Women, Gunga Din,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

R.I.P. Joan Fontaine (1917-2013)

  • The Playlist
It has been a very sad weekend, as two of cinema's most revered talents have passed away. On Saturday, it was Peter O'Toole, and just a day later, Joan Fontaine has left us at the age of 96. While her big screen career was relatively brief—her last theatrical role was in the 1966 film "The Witches"—her impact was undeniable. In the span of three years, she was nominated for an Oscar three times, winning for Best Actress in Alfred Hitchcock's classic "Suspicion" (she was nominated in the same category for "Rebecca" in 1940 and "The Constant Nymph" in 1943). And in general, the 1940s found her doing some of her most memorable work including roles in Robert Stevenson's "Jane Eyre" opposite Orson Welles, Max Ophuls' "Letter From An Unknown Woman" and "Ivy." By the '60s, Fontaine had begun working more steadily in television and on stage, where she
See full article at The Playlist »

Joan Fontaine (1917-2013)

First Peter O'Toole, and now Joan Fontaine (née Joan de Beauvoir de Havilland)? It's going to be a rough week. Hollywood lost another of its living giants this weekend when Ms Fontaine passed away of natural causes at 96 years of age. The two-time Hitchcock heroine, bizarrely the only actor to ever win an Oscar in one of his films, is survived by her daughter Debbie and her older estranged sister Olivia. Though Fontaine and Olivia de Havilland are the most successful sister movie stars of all time (both A listers, Oscar winners, and stars of at least one immortal classic) they were famously competitive, never got on well, and haven't spoken since 1975!

The actress would undoubtedly shoot us one of those delicious cocked eyebrow looks to hear her sister mentioned so prominently in all of her obituaries but Old Hollywood Mythology is too enticing to ignore. 

Though her career was very successful in the 40s,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Joan Fontaine: Iconic Actress Dies At 96

  • HollywoodLife
So sad. The legendary actress who won an Oscar for Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘Suspicion’ in 1941 passed away on Dec. 15 of natural causes. She was 96 years old.

Joan Fontaine, the cool, beautiful actress who lit up the 1940s and 50s, died from natural causes in her home in Carmel, Calif. at the age of 96 years old on Dec. 15.

Joan Fontaine: Actress Dies At 96

The Oscar-winning actress passed away in her sleep, longtime friend Noel Beutel told the Associated Press. Noel said that Joan had been fading for the last few days, but that she died peacefully.

With her soft beauty and aptitude for playing frightened damsels in distress, Joan was one of the most recognizable actresses of her time. She won an Academy Award in 1941 for starring in the Alfred Hitchcock film, Suspicion. She was also nominated for best actress for Hitchcock’s Rebecca in 1940 and for The Constant Nymph three years later.
See full article at HollywoodLife »

R.I.P. Joan Fontaine (1917 - 2013)

Oscar-winning actress Joan Fontaine has passed away at her home in Carmel, California on Sunday aged 96, it has been announced. Born in 1917 in Tokyo, Japan to British parents and the younger sister of fellow Academy Award-winner Olivia de Havilland, Fontaine began her acting career in 1935 and soon signed a contract with Rko Pictures, making her debut with a small part in No More Ladies before enjoying her first starring role in 1937's The Man Who Found Himself.

After appearing alongside Fred Astaire in A Damsel in Distress (1937), Fontaine went on to secure the lead role in Rebecca, the Hollywood debut of director Alfred Hitchcock, which saw her receiving a nomination for Best Actress. Although she lost out to Ginger Rogers, Fontaine was nominated again the following year for Suspicion, taking home the award and making her the only star to win an acting Oscar in a Hitchcock picture. Her subsequent
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Joan Fontaine Dies At 96

Not long after the loss of acting titan Peter O’Toole, we must now regretfully announce the death of Academy Award winning actress Joan Fontaine at the age of 96. Fontaine was best known for her work with Alfred Hitchcock, a partnership that saw her nominated for Best Actress for my presonal Hitchcock favourite, Rebecca, only to go on and win the next year, in 1942, for Hitchcock’s Suspicion. She would pick up another nomination in 1944 for her performance in The Constant Nymph. In 1956 she starred in Fritz Lang’s Beyond A Reasonable Doubt and took on another memorable role a decade later with The Witches, her last big screen appearance. The 60s, 70s, and 80s saw her turn her attention to TV work, with her final work being the 1994 TV movie, Good King Wenceslas.

Sister to Olivia de Havilland, Joan Fontaine was born Joan de Beauvoir de Havilland, in Tokyo
See full article at The Hollywood News »
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