7.8/10
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106 user 44 critic

Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942)

Approved | | Biography, Drama, Musical | 6 June 1942 (USA)
The life of the renowned musical composer, playwright, actor, dancer, and singer George M. Cohan.

Director:

Writers:

(screen play), (screen play) | 1 more credit »
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From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
Won 3 Oscars. Another 3 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Richard Whorf ...
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Singer - Nora
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Storyline

A musical portrait of composer/singer/dancer George M. Cohan. From his early days as a child-star in his family's vaudeville show up to the time of his comeback at which he received a medal from the president for his special contributions to the US, this is the life- story of George M. Cohan, who produced, directed, wrote and starred in his own musical shows for which he composed his famous songs. Written by Leon Wolters <wolters@strw.LeidenUniv.nl>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Based on the story of GEORGE M. COHAN with the Greatest of all his Great Music See more »


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

6 June 1942 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Triunfo supremo  »

Box Office

Gross:

$11,800,000 (USA)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

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Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Frances Langford is listed in the credits simply as "Singer". In the film, Cagney calls her "Nora", so this character is probably the real-life Nora Bayes (1880-1928). Bayes was a popular performer who recorded many Cohan songs and entertained the troops with Cohan during World War I. Bayes wrote the song "Shine on Harvest Moon" and was the subject of the Warner Brothers biopic Shine on Harvest Moon (1944). In "Yankee Doodle Dandy", Langford also sings the medley "In a Kingdom of Our Own" / "Love Nest" / "Nellie Kelly, I Love You" / "The Man Who Owns Broadway" / "Molly Malone"/ "Billie" that backs up one of Don Siegel's great montage sequences. Langford sang "Over There" to WW II American troops and toured with Bob Hope to entertain American troops in WW II, Korea and Viet Nam. See more »

Goofs

The "You're A Grand Old Flag" number, supposedly takes place in the 1906 production of "George Washington Jr.," and uses multiple period flags to represent times before 1906. The Civil War flag, as an example, is correct for the time in question. However, in the final sequence characters carry, and an soft screen projection is made of, multiple 48 star flags. The 48 star flag was not introduced until 1912. In 1906, it should have been a 45 star flag. (Oklahoma was admitted to the Union in 1907, New Mexico and Arizona in 1912). See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Critic #1: I call it a hit. What'll your review say?
Critic #2: I like it too, so I guess I'll pan it.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Frankie and Johnny (1991) See more »

Soundtracks

The Yankee Doodle Boy
(1904) (uncredited)
from the Broadway Show "Little Johnny Jones"
Written by George M. Cohan
Played during the opening credits
Sung and Danced by James Cagney and Chorus
See more »

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User Reviews

 
A Flag Waving Triumph
22 July 2004 | by (Adelaide Australia) – See all my reviews

Right from the start, I have to say you do not need to be an American to be caught up in the excitement of the blatant flag waving tribute to a great artist. "Yankee Doodle Dandy" made to boost morale after the U.S. entered the war surely would have achieved its goal. It would have been even better in Technicolor (not the coloured version later shown). The songs were great, the acting and the individual dancing style of James Cagney was superb and deserved the Oscar. The two scenes featuring "Over There" were very moving with Frances Langford a standout! The story, while bearing small resemblance to real life, was good and Walter Huston and Rosemary de Camp were excellent. When you see a film such as this some 60 years after its release, and still really enjoy it, it shows how the Golden Years of Hollywood were just that.


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