7.3/10
15
2 user

True to the Army (1942)

Approved | | Comedy, Music | 21 March 1942 (USA)
While doing her tight-rope act in a local circus, Daisy Hawkins (Judy Canova), sees the owner shot by gangsters. The gangsters are after her to eliminate the only eye witness and the police... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay) | 4 more credits »
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
Pvt. Stephen Chandler
...
Vicki Marlow
...
Pvt. 'Pinky' Fothergill
Clarence Kolb ...
Gen. Marlowe
Edward Pawley ...
Junior
...
Lt. Danvers
...
Sgt. Butts
Edwin Max ...
Ice (as Edwin Miller)
Arthur Loft ...
Ray
...
Pvt. Dugan
...
Pvt. O'Toole
Eddie Acuff ...
Sgt. Riggs
Edgar Dearing ...
Target Sergeant
Mary Treen ...
Mae
Edit

Storyline

While doing her tight-rope act in a local circus, Daisy Hawkins (Judy Canova), sees the owner shot by gangsters. The gangsters are after her to eliminate the only eye witness and the police chase her to testify against the gangsters. Daisy goes to the nearby army camp where her sweetheart, J. Wethersby "Pinky" Fothergill (Jerry Colonna), is the chief carrier pigeon trainer. Rehearsal for the big army show is being held by Private Stephen Chandler (Allan Jones. Daisy, looking like just another female impersonator to him, is mistaken for one of the boys in the chorus. Pinky sets him straight and they cut Daisy's hair and get her into a uniform, but have to work hard to convince Sergeant Butts (William Demarest) she is one of the boys. Some honest-to-goodness pulchritude comes to the show when Vicki Marlowe (Ann Miller), the daughter of General Marlowe (Clarence Kolb), becomes interested in Chandler. Daisy wins a medal for marksmanship and the soldiers insist on taking "him" to celebrate... Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

It's All-Out Fun When Judy Canova Crashes This Man's Army! See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Music

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

21 March 1942 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Swing i ledet  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

One of over 700 Paramount Productions, filmed between 1929 and 1949, which were sold to MCA/Universal in 1958 for television distribution, and have been owned and controlled by Universal ever since. See more »

Connections

Version of How to Be Very, Very Popular (1955) See more »

Soundtracks

Wacky For Khaki
Music by Harold Spina
Lyrics by Frank Loesser
Sung by Judy Canova
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Fluffy patriotic fun
30 January 2003 | by (Kitchener, Ontario, Canada) – See all my reviews

This war-time gem is as fluffy as you'd expect: the plot is thin, the relationships are cliche'd, and the acting is pretty much by-the-book. But it's also a heck of a lot of fun, and the musical numbers are top-notch.

You've got a homely, backwoods circus performer named Daisy (Judy Canova) who is more than a little stupid, and her equally dim-witted and goofy boyfriend Pinky (Jerry Colonna) who trains pigeons and dabbles in magic. Daisy and Pinky provide the slapstick, and boy to they dish it out. In Pinky's case it works -- he knows when to be subtle and when to stop a gag -- but Daisy comes off as sloppy and her timing is a little off. I'll give her this, though: she can look like a man when she needs to.

Meanwhile, at the base, Stephen (played by Alan Jones) is the romantic lead and the excuse to bring in musical numbers: he's a former Hollywood producer and is trying to put on a show...you know, those shows featuring amateurs and shoddy sets until the opening night 3 days later, when everybody is a pro and the sets are gorgeous. His love-interest is Vicki Marlow (Ann Miller), the worldly and wise daughter of the General.

The plot itself isn't all that important: gangsters want to kill Daisy, Stephen wants to put on a show featuring Daisy and Vicki, but to keep Daisy on the base he needs to disguise and protect her (from medical doctors and hooch dancers), and to get Vicki into his show he needs to woo her (which is one of the more bizarre moments in the movie: Ann goes from disliking him to loving him in the space of about 2 seconds, and his method of pitching woo seems to be to insult a girl) What is important are the occasionally inspired comic routines and the snappy songs, not to mention Ann's breathtaking taps.

The highpoints -- for me -- were the two Ann numbers ("Jitterbug Lullabye," a sweet and clever song & dance duet, and a percussive solo where she taps, claps, types, and twirls along with a machine gun and a wall-clock. This is possibly the most enjoyable and relaxed tap number I've ever seen her do: it's technically brilliant but not so frantic that her sense of fun is obscured), and the final "Wacky For Khaki," wherein Judy more-or-less drops the bumpkin twang and shows us that she really CAN sing AND be funny.

The comedy treads some familiar ground but does have it's moments: Pinky's magic tricks and odd banter are delightful, and Ann's deadpan delivery is great as well. This all comes together in a somewhat anti-climactic ending. And the army looks like a really fun place. "True to the Army" is exactly what it was meant to be: fluffy patriotic fun with great songs and distinctive leads. View it in that light and you'll have a great time.


1 of 1 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Discuss True to the Army (1942) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?