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Went the Day Well? (1942) Poster

Trivia

When the man running the pub in the village where the film was being shot discovered that he had used up his alcohol ration on the film crew, he was so distraught he committed suicide.
Basil Sydney refused to re-record some dialogue, saying that he was a member of a religious sect whose members were forbidden to look upon their own image.
The poem from which the title is taken and which appears at the start of the film, is actually the second of four epitaphs written in 1918 by Greek scholar John Maxwell Edmonds. These were written for graves and memorials for those who died in battle. The full epitaph included a heading, "On Some who died early in the Day of Battle Went the day well? We died and never knew. But, well or ill, Freedom, we died for you." Another of Edmonds' epitaphs is "When you go home, tell them of us and say, For your tomorrows these gave their today".
Alberto Cavalcanti was paid £45 a week while making the film.
Debuted in the UK December 7, 1942, exactly one year following the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor.

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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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