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Saboteur (1942) More at IMDbPro »


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

5 items from 2014


Video of the Day: See Every Alfred Hitchcock Cameo

21 August 2014 10:01 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Any Hitchcock fan has no doubt looked carefully while watching one of his movies in order to spot his infamous cameos. Hitchcock’s earlier cameos are especially hard to catch, and so Youtube user Morgan T. Rhys put together this video compiling every cameo Alfred Hitchcock ever made.

Hitchcock made a total of 39 self-referential cameos in his films over a 50 year period. Four of his films featured two cameo appearances (The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog UK), Suspicion, Rope, and Under Capricorn). Two recurring themes featured Hitchcock carrying a musical instrument, and using public transportation.

The films are as follows:

The Lodger (1927), Easy Virtue (1928), Blackmail (1929),Murder! (1930), The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934), The 39 Steps (1935),Sabotage (1936), Young and Innocent (1937), The Lady Vanishes (1938), Rebecca(1940), Foreign Correspondent (1940), Mr. & Mrs. Smith (1941), Suspicion (1941),Saboteur (1942), Shadow of a Doubt (1943), Lifeboat (1944), Spellbound (1945),Notorious (1946), The Paradine Case (1947), Rope (1948), Under Capricorn (1949),Stage Fright (1950), Strangers on a Train »

- Ricky

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Top Ten Tuesday – Top 10 Guilty Pleasure Movies

10 June 2014 6:12 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

I have a curious habit, maybe you have it too, if you are a real movie geek, film fan, cinema addict, what have you.

A certain number of movies that I have seen and loved with all my heart were losers at the box office or were mercilessly slammed by critics, usually both. This doesn’t happen all the time, mind you. I know a bad movie when I see one. But several times I have seen a movie on opening day and loved it so much I was sure it would be a big hit and be loved by critics and film goers, nope, not all the time.

Here then is my own personal and highly eccentric top ten list, with some honorable mentions, of movies that lost out, yet I love them still, many of them desperately, hysterically, madly do I love these films, well anyway… let me tell you about it. »

- Sam Moffitt

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Blu-ray, DVD Release: Sleep, My Love

9 April 2014 1:31 PM, PDT | Disc Dish | See recent Disc Dish news »

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: April 15, 2014

Price: DVD $24.95, Blu-ray $29.95

Studio: Olive Films

Don Ameche cozies up to Claudette Colbert in Sleep My Love.

With the 1948 film noir mystery Sleep, My Love, the great Douglas Sirk (All That Heaven Allows) directed the third and final teaming of Claudette Colbert (It Happened One Night) and Don Ameche (Cocoon), who previously appeared together in Mitchell Leisen’s Midnight and later in Sam Wood’s The Guest Wife).

The movie casts Colbert as Alison Courtland, a wealthy New York socialite who awakens on a Boston-bound train with no memory of how she got there. A kind, elderly woman helps Alison call her husband Richard (Ameche), who in the meantime had contacted a detective (Raymond Burr, TV’s Perry Mason) to help him find his missing wife. On the plane back home, Alison meets Bruce (Robert Cummings, The Devil and Miss Jones), who’s immediately enamored with her. »

- Laurence

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New on Video: ‘Foreign Correspondent’

20 February 2014 9:48 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Foreign Correspondent

Written by Charles Bennett and Joan Harrison

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

USA, 1940

As if his British films weren’t evidence enough of his talent, Alfred Hitchcock made quite the impression when he came to Hollywood in 1940. His first picture in the states, Rebecca, was nominated for Best Picture at the 1941 Academy Awards. So was his second, Foreign Correspondent, also released in 1940. While Rebecca would ultimately win, many – then and now – consider the achievement as belonging more to producer David O. Selznick than to the director. This is not without some justification. Though Rebecca bears more than a few notably Hitchcockian touches, between the two features, Foreign Correspondent looks and feels more appropriately like Hitchcock’s previous and later works. The Criterion Collection, recently very kind to Hitchcock on Blu-ray, now gives this latter feature a suitably well-rounded treatment, with a documentary on the film’s visual effects, an »

- Jeremy Carr

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Review: Hitchcock's "Foreign Correspondent" (1940), Criterion Dual Format Release

15 February 2014 3:32 AM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Hitchcock’s War Face

By Raymond Benson

Alfred Hitchcock’s 1940 film Foreign Correspondent is often underrated or forgotten when it comes to lists of the director’s “best” films. In fact, it was nominated for an Oscar Best Picture the same year as Rebecca (which won), and, personally, I think it’s the better movie. It’s certainly more of a “Hitchcock film” than Rebecca, as it is one of those cross-country espionage adventure-thrillers along the lines of The 39 Steps, Saboteur, and North by Northwest.

It was the director’s second Hollywood movie. Although Hitchcock was contracted to David O. Selznick (who produced Rebecca), Hitch’s deal allowed Selznick to “farm out” the director to other studios and producers, for a piece of Hitchcock’s salary, of course. In this case, Foreign Correspondent was produced by Walter Wanger (who had also produced John Ford’s Stagecoach). It’s interesting that »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

5 items from 2014


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