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A Weakness for Complexity: An Interview with the Philosopher George M. Wilson

In the late 1970s, an associate professor in the Philosophy department at Johns Hopkins (thesis title: "The Nature of the Natural Numbers") began publishing essays on Hollywood movies. George M. Wilson wasn't the first person to undergo this shift in specialism. At the start of the decade, Stanley Cavell had published The World Viewed, a series of "reflections on the ontology of film." But Cavell had always been concerned with how works of art enable us to think through philosophical themes such as knowledge and meaning, and he held a chair, at Harvard, in Aesthetics. Wilson differed in that he brought a range of analytic gifts to an ongoing revolution: the close reading of American cinema, conceived as part of the "auteur" policy of Truffaut and other writers at Cahiers du cinéma in the 1950s, and concertedly developed in the following decades by critics in England such as V. F.
See full article at MUBI »

"The Alfred Hitchcock Collection" Blu-ray Set From Universal

  • CinemaRetro
Universal has released a highly impressive Blu-ray set, "The Alfred Hitchcock Collection", on Blu-ray. The set contains fifteen special editions of the Master's top films as well as ten original episodes of "The Alfred Hitchcock Presents" television series. The set is packed with 15 hours of bonus extras and includes an illustrated, 58-page collector's booklet with extremely rare international poster art and film stills. Films included in the set are:

Psycho The Birds Vertigo Rear Window North by Northwest The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956 version) Marnie Saboteur Shadow of a Doubt Rope The Trouble with Harry Topaz Frenzy  Torn Curtain Family Plot

 

Holiday gifts like this don't get any more impressive (or sinister) for the movie lover in your life.

Click Here To Order From Amazon
See full article at CinemaRetro »

102-Year-Old Actor Who Watched Babe Ruth Play Finally Returns to World Series — 91 Years Later

102-Year-Old Actor Who Watched Babe Ruth Play Finally Returns to World Series — 91 Years Later
Norman Lloyd watched Babe Ruth rip his pants at Yankee Stadium during the 1926 World Series. And this week, he finally got another chance to attend the Fall Classic — more than 90 years later.

“It is wonderful to be at a World Series again,” Lloyd told the Los Angeles Times. “Baseball has always remained a passion for me, and I followed it religiously.”

Lloyd, who turns 103 in November, first attended the World Series when he was just 12 years old, and watched the St. Louis Cardinals take on the Yankees in Game 1, according to the publication.

“The Yankees had — now it’s like
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Hitchcock/Truffaut – Review

I was 12 years old in 1968. One of my favorite places was the library, in those days the closest library to us was the Tesson Ferry Branch in South St. Louis County. My most prized possession was my library card.

My Mother used to drop me off there on a Saturday or a summer weekday and I would spend the whole day reading. One of those days I pulled a book off the shelf called Hitchcock/Truffaut and sat down to read it. I knew who Alfred Hitchcock was from his television show, and from his monthly Mystery Magazine as well as anthologies that I was reading avidly, Tales That Frightened Even Me, More Tales for the Nervous and, my favorite, Stories to be Read After Dark.

I was aware that Alfred Hitchcock was most renowned for directing movies. I had seen a few on television, Saboteur was a mainstay on Kplr TV,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Vertigo Screens at The Hi-Pointe Saturday Morning – Here are Alfred Hitchcock’s Ten Best Movies

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo screens at St. Louis’ fabulous Hi-Pointe Theater this weekend as part of their Classic Film Series. It’s Saturday, March 11th at 10:30am at the Hi-Pointe located at 1005 McCausland Ave., St. Louis, Mo 63117. The film will be introduced by Harry Hamm, movie reviewer for Kmox. Admission is only $5

This gives us a perfect excuse to re-run this top ten list so here, according to We Are Movie Geeks, are Alfred Hitchcock’s ten best films:

Frenzy

Frenzy, Hitchcock’s next to last feature film from 1972, represented a homecoming of sorts since it was the first film completely shot in his native England since his silents and early ” talkies ” in the 1930’s. By dipping into the then somewhat new territory of serial killers, he took full advantage of the new cinema freedoms and truly earned his ‘ R ‘ MPAA rating.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

A Walk in the Sun

Lewis Milestone’s poetic character study of an infantry landing in Italy gives us a full dozen non-cliché portraits of men in war, featuring a dramatic dream team of interesting character actors. Dana Andrews was the only big star in the cast, joined by hopefuls Richard Conte, Lloyd Bridges and John Ireland; the standout crew includes Sterling Holloway, Norman Lloyd, Steve Brodie and Huntz Hall.

A Walk in the Sun

DVD

The Sprocket Vault / Kit Parker Films

1945 / B&W / 1:37 Academy / 117 min. / Restored Collector’s Edition / Street Date ?, 2017 / available through The Sprocket Vault / 14.99

Starring: Richard Conte, George Tyne, John Ireland, Lloyd Bridges, Sterling Holloway, Norman Lloyd Dana Andrews, Herbert Rudley, Richard Benedict, Huntz Hall, James Cardwell, Steve Brodie, Matt Willis, Chris Drake, John Kellogg, Robert Horton, Burgess Meredith.

Cinematography: Russell Harlan

Film Editor: Duncan Mansfield

Original Music: Fredric Efrem Rich; ‘The Ballads’ sung by : Kenneth Spencer

Written by: Robert
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Remembering Andrzej Wajda, Kevin Meaney and More Reel-Important People We Lost in October

  • Movies.com
Reel-Important People is a monthly column that highlights those individuals in or related to the movies that have left us in recent weeks. Below you'll find names big and small and from all areas of the industry, though each was significant to the movies in his or her own way. Kathryn Adams (1920-2016) - Actress. She starred in Bury Me Not on the Lone Prarie and Blonde for a Day and also appears in Hitchcock's Saboteur, the 1939 version of The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Fifth Avenue Girl, Spring ParadeThe Invisible Woman and Hellzapoppin'. She died on October 14. (THR) Jane Alderman (c.1929-2016) - Casting Director. She was instrumental in the acting careers of John Cusack, Jeremy Piven, Jennifer Beals, Gary Cole...

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Kathryn Adams Dies; ‘Saboteur’ Actress Was 96

Kathryn Adams Dies; ‘Saboteur’ Actress Was 96
Kathryn Adams, an actress who appeared in such notable films as Alfred Hitchcock’s Saboteur and the Charles Laughton-starring The Hunchback of Notre Dame, and who retired from Hollywood upon her marriage to Leave It To Beaver‘s Hugh Beaumont, died October 14 at 96. Other film credits include 1939’s Fifth Avenue Girl, 1940’s The Invisible Woman and 1946’s Blonde For a Day. In 1942, she played Mrs. Brown, a young mother, in Hitchcock’s Saboteur. In 1942, Adams married…
See full article at Deadline »

The Smallest Show On Earth: In Memory Of The Bijou (1957) And The Alger (1940-2015)

The delightful British comedy The Smallest Show on Earth headlines a great Saturday matinee offering from the UCLA Film and Television Archive on June 25 as their excellent series “Marquee Movies: Movies on Moviegoing” wraps up. So it seemed like a perfect time to resurrect my review of the movie, which celebrates the collective experience of seeing cinema in a darkened, and in this case dilapidated old auditorium, alongside my appreciation of my own hometown movie house, the Alger, which opened in 1940 and closed last year, one more victim of economics and the move toward digital distribution and exhibition.

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“You mean to tell me my uncle actually charged people to go in there? And people actually paid?” –Matt Spenser (Bill Travers) upon first seeing the condition of the Bijou Kinema, in The Smallest Show on Earth

In Basil Dearden’s charming and wistful 1957 British comedy The Smallest Show on Earth (also
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

50 More of the Greatest Matte Paintings of All Time

A few years ago the editors of Shadowlocked asked me to compile a list of what was initially to be, the ten greatest movie matte paintings of all time. A mere ten selections was too slim by a long shot, so my list stretched considerably to twenty, then thirty and finally a nice round fifty entries. Even with that number I found it wasn’t easy to narrow down a suitably wide ranging showcase of motion picture matte art that best represented the artform. So with that in mind, and due to the surprising popularity of that 2012 Shadowlocked list (which is well worth a visit, here Ed), I’ve assembled a further fifty wonderful examples of this vast, vital and more extensively utilised than you’d imagine – though now sadly ‘dead and buried’ – movie magic.

It would of course be so easy to simply concentrate on the well known, iconic,
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Yes, You Can Turn 100 in Hollywood and Still Work

Yes, You Can Turn 100 in Hollywood and Still Work
A version of this story first appeared in the Sept. 4 issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe. Meet Hollywood's 100-and-over set: they're legends, they're healthy and they're still working. In late July, 100-year-old Norman Lloyd and 102-year-old Connie Sawyer paid a visit to the Park La Brea apartment of Patricia Morison, 100, each arriving solo in an Uber and making a point of complimenting their driver’s abilities. Lloyd worked in films directed Hitchcock (1942’s Saboteur and 1945’s Spellbound), Chaplin (1952’s Limelight) and Scorsese (1991’s The Age

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See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

The Birds Screens at Schlafly Thursday – Here are Alfred Hitchcock’s Ten Best Movies

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

The Birds screens at Schlafly Bottleworks (7260 Southwest Ave.- at Manchester – Maplewood, Mo 63143) Thursday, April 2nd at 7pm. It is a benefit for Helping Kids Together (more details about this event can be found Here)

This gives us a perfect excuse to re-run this top ten list from March of 2012. Alfred Hitchcock directed 54 feature films between 1925 and 1976, and here, according to We Are Movie Geeks, are his ten best:

Frenzy

Frenzy, Hitchcock’s next to last feature film from 1972, represented a homecoming of sorts since it was the first film completely shot in his native England since his silents and early ” talkies ” in the 1930’s. By dipping into the then somewhat new territory of serial killers, he took full advantage of the new cinema freedoms and truly earned his ‘ R ‘ MPAA rating. Perhaps ole’ ” Hitch ” wanted to give those young up-and-coming
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Wright Was Earliest Surviving Best Supporting Actress Oscar Winner

Teresa Wright: Later years (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon.") Teresa Wright and Robert Anderson were divorced in 1978. They would remain friends in the ensuing years.[1] Wright spent most of the last decade of her life in Connecticut, making only sporadic public appearances. In 1998, she could be seen with her grandson, film producer Jonah Smith, at New York's Yankee Stadium, where she threw the ceremonial first pitch.[2] Wright also became involved in the Greater New York chapter of the Als Association. (The Pride of the Yankees subject, Lou Gehrig, died of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in 1941.) The week she turned 82 in October 2000, Wright attended the 20th anniversary celebration of Somewhere in Time, where she posed for pictures with Christopher Reeve and Jane Seymour. In March 2003, she was a guest at the 75th Academy Awards, in the segment showcasing Oscar-winning actors of the past. Two years later,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Wright Minibio Pt.2: Hitchcock Heroine in His Favorite Movie

Teresa Wright in 'Shadow of a Doubt': Alfred Hitchcock heroine (image: Joseph Cotten about to strangle Teresa Wright in 'Shadow of a Doubt') (See preceding article: "Teresa Wright Movies: Actress Made Oscar History.") After scoring with The Little Foxes, Mrs. Miniver, and The Pride of the Yankees, Teresa Wright was loaned to Universal – once initial choices Joan Fontaine and Olivia de Havilland became unavailable – to play the small-town heroine in Alfred Hitchcock's Shadow of a Doubt. (Check out video below: Teresa Wright reminiscing about the making of Shadow of a Doubt.) Co-written by Thornton Wilder, whose Our Town had provided Wright with her first chance on Broadway and who had suggested her to Hitchcock; Meet Me in St. Louis and Junior Miss author Sally Benson; and Hitchcock's wife, Alma Reville, Shadow of a Doubt was based on "Uncle Charlie," a story outline by Gordon McDonell – itself based on actual events.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Red States and Blue States: Anderson’s Punch-Drunk Love and an Ode to Godard

From the pool party dive in Boogie Nights inspired by Mikhail Kalatozov’s I Am Cuba to the steering wheel scene in Hard Eight that so deftly recalls Alfred Hitchcock’s Saboteur, playing spot the reference with Paul Thomas Anderson is always fun. It is through these moments that we can fully appreciate the voracious depth at which one man is embroiled in his art; forever the immersed student despite his steady rise to master, yet with a constant, gleeful wish to share with us an unconditional love for the cinema – something that we can all identify with.

Of all Paul Thomas Anderson’s creations, one continues to standout as a jarring anomaly: that being Punch-Drunk Love, which does away with many of the recurring narrative themes (fathers and sons, abandonment, etc.) that can be traced throughout his work, and instead challenges the conventions of the romance genre – though, with
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Norman Lloyd at 100: Hollywood’s Living Memory

The earliest surviving footage of broadcast television in America is a fragment of “The Streets of New York,” an adaptation of playwright Dion Boucicault’s 19th-century drama, aired by the experimental New York NBC affiliate W2XBS on August 31, 1939. All that now remains of the hour-long program is a silent, 11-minute kinescope, filmed off a TV screen and archived at the Paley Center For Media. And there, in those primitive flickering images, you can catch a glimpse of one of the show’s actors: the 24-year-old Norman Lloyd.

Next July, you can see the 99-year-old Lloyd in the Judd Apatow comedy “Trainwreck,” which shot on location in New York this summer and in which Lloyd plays, by his own admission, “a lecherous old man.” In between those unlikely bookends is a career that has quite literally spanned the 20th century and edged into the 21st, during which Lloyd has shared the stage,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Norman Lloyd at 100: THR's Todd McCarthy on a Legend's Staying Power

Norman Lloyd at 100: THR's Todd McCarthy on a Legend's Staying Power
He's been going to Broadway shows since he paid 50 cents for a balcony seat to see Al Jolson in Bombo in 1921. During the Great Depression he worked with Elia Kazan in the Theater of Action, then joined Orson Welles' Mercury Theater to act in the Boy Wonder's legendary Julius Caesar. He made his screen debut falling from the Statue of Liberty in Alfred Hitchcock's Saboteur, produced the world premiere of Bertholt Brecht's Galileo starring Charles Laughton at the Coronet Theater in Los Angeles, acted in films for Jean Renoir and Charlie Chaplin (and was the latter's tennis partner

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See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Geek Deal: 67% Off The Alfred Hitchcock: The Masterpiece Collection Limited Edition Blu-ray

Geek Deal: 67% Off The Alfred Hitchcock: The Masterpiece Collection Limited Edition Blu-ray
Amazon’s Gold Box Deal of the Day today is Alfred Hitchcock: The Masterpiece Collection Limited Edition Blu-ray for only $98.99, 67% off the $300 retail price. The Collection features 15 iconic films from the acclaimed director’s career including: Saboteur (Priscilla Lane, Robert Cummings. 1942/b&w/109 min.), Shadow of a Doubt (Joseph Cotten, Teresa Wright. 1943/b&w/108 min.), Rope […]

The post Geek Deal: 67% Off The Alfred Hitchcock: The Masterpiece Collection Limited Edition Blu-ray appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Deal! Pick Up the Alfred Hitchcock: The Masterpiece Collection Blu-ray on Sale Now

One Blu-ray collection I do not own, but am really tempted to pull the trigger on right now is the Alfred Hitchcock: The Masterpiece Collection as Amazon has dropped the price down to $98.99. The set includes 15 of Hitchcock's films including classics such as Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest, Psycho, The Birds and Rope and all the special features that come with them. Msrp on the collection is $299.98 and the sale ends at midnight tonight so if you're looking to pick it up you better hustle. Here's the complete listing of movies that come on the set and you can click here to pick it up for yourself and take a look at all the features it includes. Saboteur Shadow of a Doubt Rope Rear Window The Trouble with Harry The Man Who Knew Too Much Vertigo North by Northwest Psycho The Birds Marnie Torn Curtain Topaz Frenzy Family Plot
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Video of the Day: See Every Alfred Hitchcock Cameo

Any Hitchcock fan has no doubt looked carefully while watching one of his movies in order to spot his infamous cameos. Hitchcock’s earlier cameos are especially hard to catch, and so Youtube user Morgan T. Rhys put together this video compiling every cameo Alfred Hitchcock ever made.

Hitchcock made a total of 39 self-referential cameos in his films over a 50 year period. Four of his films featured two cameo appearances (The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog UK), Suspicion, Rope, and Under Capricorn). Two recurring themes featured Hitchcock carrying a musical instrument, and using public transportation.

The films are as follows:

The Lodger (1927), Easy Virtue (1928), Blackmail (1929),Murder! (1930), The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934), The 39 Steps (1935),Sabotage (1936), Young and Innocent (1937), The Lady Vanishes (1938), Rebecca(1940), Foreign Correspondent (1940), Mr. & Mrs. Smith (1941), Suspicion (1941),Saboteur (1942), Shadow of a Doubt (1943), Lifeboat (1944), Spellbound (1945),Notorious (1946), The Paradine Case (1947), Rope (1948), Under Capricorn (1949),Stage Fright (1950), Strangers on a Train
See full article at SoundOnSight »
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